Cabezon SS-334 - History

Cabezon SS-334 - History


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Cabezon SS-334

Cabezon
A Saltwater fish of sculpin family inhabiting the North Atlantic and North Pacific Oceans.

SS-334:dp. 1,526; l.311’9”: b.27”3”; dr. 15”3 s. 20 k, cpl 66 a.:1 5”;10 21’’ tt. Cl Gato

Cabezon (SS-334) was launched 27 August 12944 by Electric Boat Co., Groton, Conn.; sponsored by Mrs. T.R. Cooley; and commissioned 30 December 1944, Commander G.W. Lautrup in command.
Cabezon departed New London, Conn., 19 February 1945 for Key West, FL, where she underwent 3 weeks of training and providing services for the Fleet Sound School. She then sailed via the Panama Canal to Pearl Harbor, arriving 15 March 1945.
From 25 May to 11 July 1945 Cabezon conducted her first war patrol in the Sea of Okhotsk, sinking a 1,631 ton Japanese cargo vessel on 19 June. She refitted at Midway until 4 August, then departed for Saipan to serve as target ship for surface force training exercising. From 7 September 1945 until 12 January 1946 she engaged in local operations and training in Philippine waters, based at Subic Bay.

On 6 February 1946 Cabezon arrived at San Diego operating from that port until her base was changed to Pearl Harbor. Subsequent to her arrival there on 20 November 1946, she participated in local operations and training cruises for submariners of the Naval Reserve there and on the west coast with intervening cruises to the South Pacific, the North Pacific, and across the Arctic Circle. She also made two cruises to the Far East, the second of which included a recoonnaissance patrol in the vicinity of La Perouse Strait, between Hokkaido, Japan and Sakhalin, USSR. She sailed for Mare island 21 April 1953 to start inactivation and was placed out of commissions in reserve there 24 October 1953.
Cabezon received on battle star for service in World War II. Her single war patrol was designated “successful.” She is credited with having sunk a total of 2,631 tons of shipping.


USS Cabezon SS-334 (1944-1953)

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Cabezon SS-334 - History

An edible fish inhabiting the Mediterranean Sea and waters off the coast of California.

(SS-288: dp. 1,626, 1. 311'9", b. 27'3" dr. 15'3", s.
20 k. cpl. 66 a. 1 4", 10 21" tt. cl. Gato)

Cabrilla (SS-288) was launched 24 December 1942 by Portsmouth Navy Yard sponsored by Mrs. L B Combs commissioned 24 May 1943, Commander n. T. Hammond in command and reported to the Pacific Fleet.

Cabrilla arrived at Pearl Harbor 30 August 1944, and on 12 September cleared on the first of eight war patrols. After a daring exploit in which four Filipino guerrillas were taken off Negros Island, Cabrilla completed her patrol at Fremantle, Australia, her base for the next five patrols. During her second patrol, Cabrilla laid mines in the Gulf of Siam, and sank her first Japanese merchantman, then returned to Fremantle to prepare for her third patrol, a reconnaissance of Sunda Strait. Her fourth and fifth patrols, off Makassar, and in the Celebes and Sulu Seas, found her again striking with telling results against Japanese merchant shipping. Most successful of her patrols was the sixth, in the South China Sea and off Luzon from 13 September to 25 October 1944. During this period she sank a total of 24,557 tons of shipping, including a 10,059-ton tanker. Cabrilla made her seventh war patrol in vicious weather in the Kuriles of northern Japan, and her last patrol found her on lifeguard duty for aviators downed at sea while carrying out attacks on Japan.

Homeward-bound after 2 arduous years, Cabrilla cleared Fremantle 31 August 1945 for the States. Following overhaul at Philadelphia, she sailed for the Canal Zone for exercises (19 February-17 March 1946) then underwent pre inactivation overhaul at Philadelphia. Cabrilla was placed out of commission in reserve 7 August 1946.

Cabrilla received six battle stars for World War II service. Of her eight patrols, six were designated as "Successful War Patrols." She is credited with having sunk a total of 38,767 tons of shipping.


USS Cabezon (SS-334)

USS Cabezon (SS-334) was a Balao-class submarine of the United States Navy, named for the cabezon, a saltwater fish of sculpin family inhabiting the North Atlantic and North Pacific Oceans (cabezon means "big head" in Spanish).

Cabezon was launched 27 August 1944 by Electric Boat Company, Groton, Connecticut sponsored by Mrs. Adelaide Prescott Cooley (née Morris), wife of Captain Thomas Ross Cooley, commanding officer of USS Washington and commissioned 30 December 1944, Commander G. W. Lautrup in command.

Cabezon departed New London, Connecticut, 19 February 1945 for Key West, Florida, where she underwent 3 weeks of training and providing services for the Fleet Sound School. She then sailed via the Panama Canal, to Pearl Harbor, arriving 15 March 1945.

From 25 May to 11 July 1945 Cabezon conducted her first war patrol in the Sea of Okhotsk, sinking a 2,631-ton Japanese cargo vessel on 19 June. She refitted at Midway until 4 August, then departed for Saipan to serve as target ship for surface force training exercises. From 7 September 1945 until 12 January 1946 she engaged in local operations and training in Philippine waters, based at Subic Bay.

On 6 February 1946 Cabezon arrived at San Diego, operating from that port until her base was changed to Pearl Harbor. Subsequent to her arrival there on 20 November 1946, she participated in local operations and training cruises for submariners of the Naval Reserve there and on the west coast with intervening cruises to the South Pacific, the North Pacific, and in 1947 participated in Operation Blue Nose in the Chukchi Sea. She also made two cruises to the Far East (18 March – 29 July 1950 and 21 April – 16 October 1952), the second of which included a reconnaissance patrol in the vicinity of La Perouse Strait, between Hokkaidō, Japan, and Sakhalin, U.S.S.R.

Cabezon sailed for Mare Island 21 April 1953 to start inactivation and was placed out of commission in reserve there 24 October 1953 and laid up in the Pacific Reserve Fleet. Struck from the Naval Register, 15 May 1970, she was sold for scrapping, 28 December 1971.


Climbing Cabezon Peak

The best way to understand the geology of the necks and plugs is to go see them. Exploring different necks and plugs illustrates the varied rock types and formation processes. The vertical columns of black basalt that make up the bulk of Cabezon are a magnet for experienced rock climbers, and a number of routes have been tested. However, they are not for the faint of heart, and should only be attempted with proper climbing gear and expert knowledge. For more information, contact the New Mexico Mountain Club.

If you are a strong hiker and comfortable with scree slopes, scrambling, and a bit of climbing, there is an "Easy Way" to summit Cabezon Peak that is non-technical (no ropes required). However, the route is Class 3, with a couple of very short sections that verge on Class 4. From the parking area, an obvious trail heads steeply uphill to the east through Cretaceous sediments. After nearly a mile, on the southeast shoulder of the peak you will see a large rock cairn and a ten-foot-long rock arrow pointing towards a chimney in the rock face above. Here you head up a steep braided trail of loose dirt and basalt rock. In and above the chimney, you will find a mix of rocky trail, boulder hopping, and two places that require finding handholds and footholds to pull yourself up. The last short stretch returns to a good trail and the summit. The 360-degree views from the top are spectacular this is New Mexico at its best. Round trip hiking time is 3-4 hours. For a more detailed description of the summit hike, see: http://www.summitpost.org/the-easy-way/160860.

Those who are not comfortable taking the spur trail to the summit can continue past the rock arrow on a faint trail that circumnavigates the entire peak, connecting back up with the main trail half way between the parking area and the arrow. This route involves traversing two boulderfields and crossing some sloped areas, but is much easier than the summit climb. The trail can be difficult to find at times, but don&rsquot worry if you lose it. Keeping in mind that you are circling the peak will prevent you from getting lost. This 2.4 mile loop takes about 2-3 hours, and majestic views in all directions from various parts of the circle are your reward. For a more detailed description of both the summit hike and the loop trail, see pages 232-235 of Stephen Ausherman&rsquos book &ldquo60 Hikes within 60 Miles&rdquo.


Cabezon SS-334 - History

5,223 Tons (surfaced)
6,560 Tons (submerged)
122m x 12m x 7m
8 x torpedo tubes
1 x 140mm deck gun
bridge 25mm AA gun
3 x 3x25mm AA gun
3 x M6A1 Seirans

Sub History
The submarine included radar and radar detectors and watertight hanger for three Aichi M6A1 Serian seaplanes. Laid down on September 29, 1943 at Kobe. Completed and commissioned on January 8, 1945, assigned to Captain Ariizumi.

Wartime History
The Japanese Navy planned to use the I-400 along with the I-401, I-13 and I-14 to participate in a daring plan to attack the Panama Canal and disable its locks. In June 1945 the decision was made to switch targets to hit USN anchorage at Ulithi Atoll.

The plan was code-named Arashi (storm) for the I-400 and I-401 to use its Serians on Kamikaze attacks on any carriers based there. Both subs departed Ominato on July 23, 1945.

The sub was accidentally fired upon by friendly shore batteries at the Tsugaru Strait, but suffered no damage. After passing through a storm, the sub spotted aircraft and screw noise near Marcus Island, forcing them to detour to the east, and sent a message to I-400 to rendezvous 100 miles south of Ponape, but the other sub failed to receive it. The strike date was set for August 17, but Japan surrendered on 15th.

Surrender
After hearing of the surrender, the Captain elected to return to Yokosuka, to surrender in Japanese home waters. They jettisoned their Serain aircraft. USS Segundo SS-398 located her on radar and negotiated for the sub's surrender. On the voyage back, the captain Ariizumi committed suicide, and the sub was surrendered by its LtCdr Nambu. Sailed to Hawaii, and evaluated by the US Navy.

Sinking History
On May 31, 1946 at 10:59am off Barber's Point on Oahu, sunk by two torpedoes from the USS Cabezon (SS-334), testing the Mark 10-3 exploder in deep water. Over the course of several days four captured subs were sunk including I-201, I-14, and I-400.

Shipwreck
On March 17, 2005, University of Hawaii's Hawaii Undersea Research Laboratory's (HURL) Pisces submersible discovered the submarine lying flat on the sea floor at 2,665' / 820m. It was identified from the "I-401" painted in white on the left side of the coning tower. Pisces recorded video and photographs of the wreckage.

Artifacts
Prior to the sinking, some items were taken by U.S. Navy personnel and later sold or traded to collectors. The Yokohama WWII Japanese Military Radio Museum has two items from the I-401 on display: gun sight and M6A1 Serian bomb site.

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Dictionary of American Naval Fighting Ships

The third Nereus was laid down 11 October 1943 by U.S. Naval Shipyard, Mare Island, Vallejo, Calif., launched 12 February 1945, sponsored by Mrs. A. M. Hurst and commissioned 27 October 194S, Captain L. D. Follmer in command.

Submarine tenders enabled the Navy to move into a conquered island and in a matter of a day or so have a submarine base in full commission, able to service and repair any of our submarines regardless of its type or special equipment. At our island bases in World War II, submarine tenders worked indefatigably to keep the submarine at sea and on the firing line.

Although designed to repair submarines and commissioned after Japan's surrender, Nereus could nevertheless claim to be one of history's successful ASW weapons. After shakedown in the fall of 1945, the new submarine tender departed 15 December for Japan. Arriving Sasebo early in 1946, she stripped 39 Japanese submarines of all usable equipment and material before towing them to sea and sinking them with her guns in Operation "Roads End" 1 and 2 April.

Soon underway for home, she arrived San Diego 13 May for a year of submarine service and repair work. On 28 June 1947 she got underway for Operation "Blue Nose." This cruise was entirely novel for a submarine tender. Together with the submarines Boarfish (SS-327), Caiman (SS-323), and Cabezon (SS-334), Nereus was assigned to TG 17.3. On 15 July she left for the Aleutian Islands where Rear Admiral Alan R. McCann, Commander Submarine Force Pacific came aboard. The group was underway again 25 July, this time for the Pribiloff Islands. During this transit Army Air Force planes based at Adak took part in the antisubmarine training. On 30 July Nereus passed through the Bering Strait and crossed the Arctic Circle.

Following along the International Date Line, the ships of Operation "Blue Nose" sighted pack ice on the morning of 1 August 1947. After reaching 72°15' north latitude, the ships continued independently along the ice pack to determine its shape.

Before returning to her home port of San Diego, Nereus visited Norton Bay, Kodiak, Juneau, and Vancouver, B.C. The cruise was followed by the ship's first overhaul, at Mare Island.

Since 1948 Nereus has been primarily engaged in submarine repair and services at San Diego, Calif. During these two decades of faithful service keeping the Navy's submarines at peak fighting trim, Nereus made occasional cruises to Pearl Harbor to Acapulco, Mexico, and various west coast ports. In 1948 she was camera ship photographing the sinking of cruiser Salt Lake City some 130 miles off the west coast. In the spring of 1955, she accompanied submarines Tunny (SSG-282), Carbonero (SS-339) and Cusk (SS-348) to Pearl Harbor and acted as observer ship and advance base headquarters during the first firing of operational missiles from submarines.

In November 1960 Halibut (SSGN-587) came alongside Nereus, the first nuclear submarine to be serviced by a tender on the west coast. The following year she ministered to fleet ballistic missile (Polaris) submarine Theodore Roosevelt. In the fall of 1964, Nereus provided underwater support for the operational evaluation of the ASROC weapons system. Two years later her versatility in servicing Shields (DD-596) won her praise from ComSubPac, and the destroyer's captain.


Cabezon SS-334 - History

A saltwater fish of sculpin family inhabiting the North Atlantic and North Pacific Oceans.

(SS - 334: dp. 1,526 l. 311'9" b. 27'3" dr. 15'3" s. 20 k. cpl. 66 a. 1 5", 10 21" tt. cl. Gato )

Cabezon (SS-334) was launched 27 August 1944 by Electric Boat Co., Groton, Conn. sponsored by Mrs. T. R. Cooley and commissioned 30 December 1944, Commander G. W. Lautrup in command.

Cabezon departed New London, Conn., 19 February 1945 for Key West, Fla., where she underwent 3 weeks of training and providing services for the Fleet Sound School. She then sailed via the Panama Canal, to Pearl Harbor, arriving 15 March 1945.

From 25 May to 11 July 1945 Cabezon conducted her first war patrol in the Sea of Okhotsk, sinking a 2,631-ton Japanese cargo vessel on 19 June. She refitted at Midway until 4 August, then departed for Saipan to serve as target ship for surface force training exercises. From 7 September 1945 until 12 January 1946 she engaged in local operations and training in Philippine waters, based at Subic Bay.

On 6 February 1946 Cabezon arrived at San Diego, operating from that port until her base was changed to Pearl Harbor. Subsequent to her arrival there on 20 November 1946, she participated in local operations and training cruises for submariners of the Naval Reserve there and on the west coast with intervening cruises to the South Pacific, the North Pacific, and across the Arctic Circle. She also made two cruises to the Far East (18 March-29 July 1950 and 21 April-16 October 1952), the second of which included a reconnaissance patrol in the vicinity of La Perouse Strait, between Hokkaido, Japan, and Sakhalin, U.S.S.R. She sailed for Mare Island 21 April 1953 to start inactivation and was placed out of commission in reserve there 24 October 1953.

Cabezon received one battle star for service in World War II. Her single war patrol was designated "successful." She is credited with having sunk a total of 2,631 tons of shipping.


USS Cabezon SS-334

The USS Cabezon (SS-334) was a U.S. Navy submarine, approximately 312 feet long and 27 feet wide, carrying a crew of 70 enlisted men and 10 officers. A sub of the Balao class, the Cabezon was named for a fish that inhabits the North Pacific and North Atlantic Oceans. “Cabezon” is a Spanish word for “big head.”

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The Cabezon is credited with sinking one vessel in World War II she received a single battle star for her service.

A Japanese Cargo Vessel
Built by the Electric Boat Company and launched in August 1944, the Cabezon’s first and only World War II patrol was in the Sea of Okhotsk in 1945. She sank a 2,600-ton Japanese cargo vessel and was then refitted at Midway. She later performed training and local operations based at Subic Bay, Philippines.

Training and Reconnaissance
The Cabezon’s home base was moved to San Diego in early 1946, and then to Pearl Harbor. Next were training cruises, local operations, and cruises to the:

 North Pacific
 South Pacific
 Arctic Circle
 Far East

The Cabezon’s missions included a reconnaissance operation near La Perouse Strait, between the USSR and Hokkaidō, Japan.

The USS Cabezon was put on reserve at Mare Island Naval Shipyard in Vallejo, California in 1953. She was sold for scrap in late 1971.

Asbestos Used in the USS Cabezon
There’s little doubt that asbestos was used in the construction of the Cabezon, as was true for most (possibly all) U.S. Navy vessels built in the 1940s through the 1960s. In addition, the following activities present significant opportunities for exposure to dangerous levels of asbestos:

 ship/submarine repairs
 maintenance
 overhauls
 conversions
 stripping
 scrapping

Learn More about the Rights of Asbestos Victims
If you were involved in any of these activities in connection with a Navy vessel — or if it is a member of your family who did so — learn more about the dangers of asbestos exposure, including the risk of cancers and severe respiratory disorders. Contact an asbestos victims’ rights law firm near you to get answers to your medical and legal questions.


Cabezon SS-334 - History

Soon underway for home, she arrived San Diego 13 May for a year of submarine service and repair work. On 28 June 1947 she got underway for Operation "Blue Nose." This cruise was entirely novel for a submarine tender. Together with the submarines Boarfish (SS-327) Caiman (SS-323),and Cabezon (SS-334), Nereus was assigned to TG 17.3. On 15 July she left for the Aleutian Islands where Rear Admiral Alan R. McCann, Commander Submarine Force Pacific came aboard. The group was underway again 25 July, this time for the Islands. During this transit Army Air Force planes based at Adak took part in the antisubmarine training. On 30 July Nereus passed through the Bering Strait and crossed the Arctic Circle. Following along the International Date Line, the ships of Operation "Blue Nose" sighted pack ice on the morning of 1 August 1947. After reaching 72 degrees 15' north latitude, the ships continued independently along the ice pack to determine its shape. Before returning to her home port of San Diego, Nereus visited Norton Bay, Kodiak, Juneau, and Vancouver, B.C. The cruise was followed by the ship's first overhaul, at Mare Island.

Since 1948 Nereus has been primarily engaged in submarine repair and services at San Diego, Calif. During these two decades of faithful service keeping the Navy's submarines at peak fighting trim, Nereus made occasional cruises to Pearl Harbor to Acapulco, Mexico and various west coast ports. In 1948 she was camera ship photographing the sinking of cruiser Salt Lake City some 130 miles off the west coast. In the spring of 1955, she accompanied submarines Tunny (SSG-282), Carbonero (SS-337) and Cusk (SS-348) to Pearl Harbor and acted as observer ship and advance base head-quarters during the first firing of operational missiles from submarines.


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