25 June 1942

25 June 1942


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25 June 1942

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North Africa

General Auchinleck takes direct command in the western desert

British 8th Army retreats to Mersa Matruh

Western Front

General Eisenhower is appointed Commander-in-Chief Europe



The sinking of the Japanese destroyer Yamakaze, as seen through the periscope of the USS Nautilus (the submarine that torpedoed the Yamakaze), on 25 June 1942 [2985x2048]

The Japanese Merchant Marine lost 8.1 million tons of vessels during the war, with submarines accounting for 4.9 million tons (60%) of the losses.(4) Additionally, U.S. submarines sank 700,000 tons of naval ships (about 30% of the total lost) including 8 aircraft carriers, 1 battleship and 11 cruisers.(5) Of the total 288 U.S. submarines deployed throughout the war (including those stationed in the Atlantic), 52 submarines were lost with 48 destroyed in the war zones of the Pacific.(6) American submariners, who comprised only 1.6% of the Navy, suffered the highest loss rate in the U.S. Armed Forces, with 22% killed.

American submariners, who comprised only 1.6% of the Navy, suffered the highest loss rate in the U.S. Armed Forces, with 22% killed.

German submariners suffered 75% killed, if memory serves correctly.

The Japanese Merchant Marine lost 8.1 million tons of vessels during the war, with submarines accounting for 4.9 million tons (60%) of the losses.

The US sub fleet is therefore the best candidate for the strategically decisive branch of the US armed forces.


Wolcott, CT – June 25, 1942

On June 25, 1942, a flight of Curtiss P-40 aircraft were on a formation training flight over the Wolcott, area. The aircraft were in a “string” formation following the flight leader. At one point the formation dove low over the water of Hitchcock Lake, and one P-40, (41-36501), struck the slipstream of the plane ahead which caused 41-36501 to dip, and the propeller to touch the water. Upon contact with the water, the propeller abruptly stopped spinning, and an instant later engine oil covered the entire cockpit canopy. The plane’s momentum carried it across the lake and into some tress at the shoreline. Although the plane was wrecked, the pilot escaped with no injuries.

The aircraft were part of the 65th Fighter Squadron stationed at Rentschler Field in East Hartford, Connecticut.


Bahá'í History

June 25. On this date in 1942, Abdu'l-Jalil Bey Sa'd died. He was a prominent member of the Egyptian Baha'i community in its early days, a Hand of the Cause of God, and a member of the National Spiritual Assembly of the Bahá'ís of Egypt and the Sudan.

Abdu'l-Jalil was converted to the Baha'i Faith by Mírzá Abu'l-Fadl, and he devoted himself to service of the Cause in Egypt for the remainder of his life.

He was a judge on the Civil Court of Egypt and in 1923 he wrote several articles arguing that religious freedom should be applied to all religions. The government of Egypt decided to legislate religious freedom for all religions later that year. In 1929 Abdu'l-Jalil met with the Prime Minister of Egypt and attempted to negotiate better conditions for the Egyptian Baha'i community.

In 1934 he refuted attacks on the faith from the Muslim scholar Shaykh el Karashi in a series of articles titled 'The Baha'i Faith is an Everlasting Truth'. In response the Egyptian Minister of Justice was asked to prevent Abdu'l-Jalil from publishing, and he requested that Abdu'l-Jalil stop writing articles in defense of the Faith. Abdu'l-Jalil responded by saying:

"If your excellency wishes me to cease defending my belief, then the other side should also cease attacking it"

This lead to the Egyptian House of Parliament banning both parties from publishing, and Abdu'l-Jalil was exiled to Northern Egypt.

While in Northern Egypt he produced the first translation of The Dawn-breakers in Arabic which was published in 1941. All printed copies of the translation were seized by the Muslim authorities of Egypt before they could be distributed. Abdu'l-Jalil garnered support, and managed to not only regain possession of the books, but also permission to distribute them within Egypt and in other countries.
In 1941 he received permission to construct a Ḥaẓíratu’l-Quds in Cairo. He personally oversaw the project, but fell ill and passed away before it was completed.

He diedon June 25, 1942. After his passing Shoghi Effendi sent the following telegram to the Baha'is:


Gen. Dwight D. Eisenhower

(History.com) June 25 - Following his arrival in London, Major General Dwight D. Eisenhower takes command of U.S. forces in Europe. Although Eisenhower had never seen combat during his 27 years as an army officer, his knowledge of military strategy and talent for organization were such that Army Chief of Staff General George C. Marshall chose him over nearly 400 senior officers to lead U.S. forces in the war against Germany. After proving himself on the battlefields of North Africa and Italy in 1942 and 1943, Eisenhower was appointed supreme commander of Operation Overlord--the Allied invasion of northwestern Europe.

Born in Denison, Texas, in 1890, Eisenhower graduated from the United States Military Academy in 1915. Out of a remarkable class that was to produce 59 generals, Eisenhower ranked 61st academically and 125th in discipline out of a total of 164 graduates. As a commissioned officer, his superiors soon took note of his organizational abilities, and appointed him commander of a tank training center after the U.S. entrance into World War I in 1917. In October 1918, he received the orders to take the tanks to France, but the war ended before they could sail. Eisenhower received the Distinguished Service Medal but was disappointed that he had not seen combat.

Between the wars, he steadily rose in the peacetime ranks of the U.S. Army. From 1922 to 1924, he was stationed in the Panama Canal Zone, and in 1926, as a major, he graduated from the Army's Command and General Staff School at Fort Leavenworth, Kansas, at the top of a class of 275. He was rewarded with a prestigious post in France and in 1928 graduated first in his class from the Army War College. In 1933, he became aide to Army Chief of Staff General Douglas MacArthur, and in 1935 he went with MacArthur to the Philippines when the latter accepted a post as chief military adviser to that nation's government.

Promoted to the rank of lieutenant colonel while in the Philippines, Eisenhower returned to the United States in 1939 shortly after World War II began in Europe. President Franklin Roosevelt began to bring the country to war preparedness in 1940 and Eisenhower found himself figuring prominently in a rapidly expanding U.S. Army. In March 1941, he was made a full colonel and three months later was appointed commander of the 3rd Army. In September, he was promoted to brigadier general.

After the United States entered World War II in December 1941, Army Chief of Staff Marshall appointed Eisenhower to the War Plans Division in Washington, where he prepared strategy for an Allied invasion of Europe. Promoted to major general in March 1942 and named head of the operations division of the War Department, he advised Marshall to create a single post that would oversee all U.S. operations in Europe. Marshall did so and on June 11 surprised Eisenhower by appointing him to the post over 366 senior officers. On June 25, 1942, Eisenhower arrived at U.S. headquarters in London and took command.

In July, Eisenhower was appointed lieutenant general and named to head Operation Torch, the Allied invasion of French North Africa. As supreme commander of a mixed force of Allied nationalities, services, and equipment, Eisenhower designed a system of unified command and rapidly won the respect of his British and Canadian subordinates. From North Africa, he successfully directed the invasions of Tunisia, Sicily, and the Italian mainland, and in December 1943 was appointed Supreme Allied Commander of the Allied Expeditionary Force. Operation Overlord, the largest combined sea, air, and land military operation in history, was successfully launched against Nazi-occupied Europe on June 6, 1944. On May 7, 1945, Germany surrendered. By that time, Eisenhower was a five-star general.

After the war, Eisenhower replaced Marshall as army chief of staff and from 1948 to 1950 served as president of Columbia University. In 1951, he returned to military service as supreme commander of the North Atlantic Treaty Organization (NATO). Pressure on Eisenhower to run for U.S. president was great, however, and in the spring of 1952 he relinquished his NATO command to run for president on the Republican ticket.

In November 1952, "Ike" won a resounding victory in the presidential elections and in 1956 was reelected in a landslide. A popular president, he oversaw a period of great economic growth in the United States and deftly navigated the country through increasing Cold War tensions on the world stage. In 1961, he retired with his wife, Mamie Doud Eisenhower, to his farm in Gettysburg, Pennsylvania, which overlooked the famous Civil War battlefield. He died in 1969 and was buried on a family plot in Abilene, Kansas.


25 June 1942 - History

United States Missing In Action (MIA)
World War II Pacific Theater

5th Air Force (5th AF)
United States Army Air Force (USAAF)
Do you have information on a Pacific WWII MIA? Submit Information
This list is not complete, it is an ongoing work in progress.

A-20A 40-155 pilot Pruitt crashed November 16, 1942
A-20A "Minnie Ha Ha / Cleo III" 40-170 pilot Good ditched March 26, 1943, 1 prisoner, 2 missing
A-20G 42-54082 pilot Pollard MIA March 13, 1944 discovered 1980, CILHI 1983, 1990, status ?
A-20G 42-54085 pilot Miars MIA March 13, 1944 found 1980, CILHI 1983, 1 recovered, 1 missing
A-20G 42-54117 pilot Hansen MIA March 13, 1944 discovered 1980, CILHI 1983, status ?
A-20G "Crap Shooter" 42-54155 pilot Andreotti crashed October 1, 1944, 3 missing, resolved
A-20G 42-86616 pilot Pearson MIA February 15, 1944
A-20G 42-86618 pilot Scarlott MIA March 12, 1944 discovered 1948, remains recovered, resolved
A-20G 42-86621 pilot McGaughey ditched June 10, 1944, 1 missing
A-20G 42-86625 pilot Bird MIA March 12, 1944 Bird remains recovered 2001, Davis remains missing, 1 missing
A-20G 42-86717 pilot Campagna crashed October 1, 1944, 3 missing, resolved
A-20G "Good Time Charlie" 42-86727 pilot Burke MIA June 19, 1944
A-20G 42-86728 pilot Norris MIA February 15, 1944
A-20G 42-86730 pilot Garlick MIA March 12, 1944 discovered 1971, remains recovered, 1 missing
A-20G 42-86736 pilot Lindsay crash landed July 19, 1944, 3 missing
A-20G 42-86748 pilot Russell MIA April 17, 1945
A-20G 42-86768 pilot Prince MIA May 14, 1944, one rescued, 3 missing
A-20G "The Texan" 43-9098 pilot Smart ditched April 16, 1944 wreckage discovered 1982, 2 missing
A-20G "Short Stuff" 43-9106 pilot Klein ditched August 11, 1944, gunner only MIA
A-20G 43-9122 pilot Rimer MIA February 4, 1944
A-20G "Sweet Milk / Baby Doll II" 43-9113 pilot Keeton crashed May 15, 1944 remains recovered 1972, resolved
A-20G 43-9118 pilot Richardson MIA March 26, 1944
A-20G 43-9180 pilot Grims crashed September 10, 1944 wreckage known, 1 missing
A-20G 43-9392 pilot Wells crashed August 11, 1944, 2 missing, case resolved
A-20G 43-9395 pilot Fick MIA June 17, 1944
A-20G 43-9399 pilot Fraker MIA November 1, 1944
A-20G 43-9406 pilot Kellum MIA June 17, 1944
A-20G 43-9410 pilot Wisdom crashed April 10, 1944, 4 MIA
A-20G 43-9419 pilot Knobloch crashed November 21, 1944 remains recovered, case resolved
A-20G 43-9488 pilot Jovanovich ditched April 16, 1944 two MIA
A-20G 43-9499 pilot Sparks MIA July 9, 1944
A-20G 43-9624 pilot Dean crashed July 14, 1944 one still MIA
A-20G 43-9626 plot Jesser crashed March 18, 1944 wreckage known, two missing
A-20G 43-9432 pilot Knarr crashed July 22, 1944, 2 missing
A-20G "Florida Gator" 43-21379 pilot Pagh MIA August 11, 1944, 2 missing
A-20G 43-21390 pilot Brooks ditched April 27, 1945
A-20G 43-21414 pilot Duval ditched June 19, 1944 gunner MIA
A-20G "Pistol Packing Mama" 43-21416 pilot Hollingshead crashed June 29, 1944 discovered 1973, remains recovered, case resolved
A-20G 43-21430 pilot Van crashed July 9, 1944
A-20G 43-21622 pilot Hamwey crashed January 20, 1945
A-20G 43-21638 pilot Showalter crashed November 8, 1944 remains recovered, resolved with possible unknown
A-20G 43-22155 pilot Jennings MIA March 19, 1945 one rescued, one missing

A-24 41-15819 pilot Schwab crashed July 29, 1942
A-24 41-15766 pilot Dean crashed July 29, 1942, crew killed or executed recovered, wreckage known
A-24 41-15796 pilot Tubb MIA February 20, 1942
A-24 41-15797 pilot Rogers crashed July 29, 1942, two missing
A-24 41-15798 pilot Swartz MIA April 7, 1942 two missing
A-24 41-15. pilot Parker crashed July 29, 1942, crew killed or executed recovered
A-24 41-15. pilot Cassels crashed July 29, 1942

B-17E "Why Don't We Do This More Often" 41-2429 pilot Pease crashed August 7, 1942, one recovered, nine MIA
B-17E "Naughty But Nice" 41-2430 pilot Sarsfield crashed June 26, 1943 discovered 1949, CILHI visit 1983-84
B-17E 41-2434 pilot Hoevet crashed August 16, 1942
B-17E 41-2435 pilot Watson crashed August 2, 1943
B-17E 41-2442 pilot Hensley MIA February 1, 1943
B-17E 41-2464 pilot Piehl MIA July 8, 1944
B-17E 41-2476 pilot Sparks MIA January 29, 1942, 9 missing
B-17E 41-2505 pilot Fagen MIA April 25, 1942 discovery 1961, recovery 1984, 1987, 1990 case resolved
B-17E 41-2536 pilot Frost MIA November 22, 1942
B-17E 41-2586 pilot McWilliams crashed January 21, 1943
B-17E "Red Moose Express" 41-2634 pilot Brenneman shot down August 3, 1943
B-17E 41-2635 pilot Hancock crashed Nov 1, 1942 discovered 1999, recovered 2001, case resolved 2005
B-17E 41-2643 pilot Grundmann crashed August 9, 1942 discovered 1946, 2 recovered, case status ?
B-17E "Miss Carriage" 41-2645 pilot Crowell MIA December 1, 1942
B-17E 41-2650 pilot Burcky crashed September 17, 1942 one MIA
B-17E "Chief of Seattle" 41-2656 pilot Cook MIA August 14, 1942
B-17E 41-2663 pilot Erb ditched September 12, 1942, 5 MIA, 1 recovered
B-17E 41-9011 pilot Geddes crashed May 21, 1943, 4 POW, executed
B-17E 41-9126 pilot Wilsey MIA August 28, 1943
B-17E 41-9151 pilot Hall MIA February 1, 1943
B-17E 41-9207 pilot Naumann crashed June 1, 1943
B-17F "Ka Puhio Wela / Double Trouble" 41-24356 pilot Moore crashed March 3, 1943, 10 missing
B-17F "Pluto" 41-24384 pilot Ramey MIA March 26, 1943, 12 missing
B-17F "Hell From Heaven Men" 41-24424 pilot McMullan ditched March 15, 1943, 7 missing
B-17F 41-24427 pilot Williams MIA September 15, 1942
B-17F "Dumbo" 41-24429 pilot Anderson crashed December 4, 1942 wreckage located 1946 remains recovered
B-17F "Taxpayers Pride" 41-24448 discovered post war, remains recovered, 1 missing
B-17F "San Antonio Rose" 41-24458 pilot Lindberg MIA January 5, 1943
B-17F "Fighting Swede" 41-24520 pilot Keatts MIA May 8, 1943
B-17F "Pluto" 41-24543 pilot Barnett crashed June 30, 1943 remains recovered 1948, group burial, resolved
B-17F 41-24546 pilot Titus MIA November 29, 1942
B-17F "Listen Here Tojo" 41-24552 pilot Eberly crashed Sept 15, 1943, discovered 1982, CILHI 1983, resoved 1998

B-24A 40-2374 pilot Kester crashed March 3, 1942
B-24D "Hells Angels" 41-11903 pilot Jones MIA August 15, 1943, 11 missing
B-24D "Pelly-Can" 41-23688 pilot Olsen crashed June 23, 1943
B-24D "Yanks From Hell" 41-23716 pilot Casale crashed August 17, 1943
B-24D "Cowtown's Revenge" 41-23750 pilot Higgins ditched January 6, 1943, 1 missing
B-24D "Crosair" 41-23752 pilot Kuhl ditched January 1, 1943 discovery 2002, 1 missing
B-24D "Lady Beverly" 41-23760 pilot Werner ditched November 15, 1942, wreckage known, 6 missing
B-24D 41-23766 pilot Rafferty crashed December 20, 1942
B-24D 41-23773 piloted by Rose MIA January 6, 1943
B-24D "Texas Terror" 41-23825 pilot Gumaer crashed Dec 18, 1942 remains recovered 1943, 1959 case resolved
B-24D 41-23975 pilot McNeese, four MIA crashed February 13, 1943
B-24D 41-24017 piloted by Rininsland MIA February 12, 1943
B-24D "Miss Carriage" 41-24207 pilot Stiles crashed August 20, 1943
B-24D 41-24044 pilot Regan MIA January 22, 1943
B-24D "Tyrannosaurus Rex" 41-24068 pilot McNair crashed April 10, 1943 remains recovered 1943, resolved
B-24D 41-24093 pilot Littlepage MIA July 6, 1943
B-24D 41-24269 pilot Almond MIA May 19, 1943
B-24D "Twin Niftys" 42-40348 pilot Freas MIA August 17, 1943 discovered 1946, some remains recovered 1948, 1 missing
B-24D 42-40352 pilot Chovanec crashed April 30, 1943 wreckage found May 7, 1943 remains recovered, resolved
B-24D "Beautiful Betsy" 42-40387 pilot McDaniel MIA Feb 26, 1945 discovered 1994 remains recovered, resolved
B-24D "The Swan" 42-40475 pilot Coleman crashed December 3, 1943 discovered 2001, recovery 2004, resolved 2008
B-24D "Fyrtle Myrtle" 42-40485 pilot Farrington crashed October 26, 1943
B-24D "Careless" 42-40500 pilot Payne MIA July 11, 1943
B-24D "Mr. Five By Five" 42-40505 pilot Johnson crashed Oct 9, 1944 discovery 02, recovery 03 case resolved 2006
B-24D "Esmeralda II" 42-40507 pilot Merkel crashed July 10, 1943 remains recoverd, case resolved
B-24D "The Red Ass" 42-40524 pilot Lippincott MIA September 11, 1943
B-24D "Toughy" 42-40525 pilot Terpnin crashed May 7, 1944 discovered 1973, remains recovered case resolved
B-24D "The Leila Belle" 42-40527 pilot Smith MIA June 11, 1943 wreckage known since 1970s
B-24D "Ben Buzzard" 42-40670 pilot Blount ditched October 18, 1943 wreckage known, 5 missing
B-24D 42-40814 pilot Tosch MIA July 19, 1944
B-24D "Lobo" 42-40830 pilot Smith December 1, 1943
B-24D 42-40886 pilot Heuss, MIA November 21, 1943, wreckage known
B-24D "Shack Rat" 42-40918 pilot Volz MIA October 27, 1942 wreckage found 2002, case resolved 2010
B-24D 42-40934 pilot Bonner MIA October 13, 1943
B-24D 42-40972 pilo Hafner MIA November 5 , 1943 discovered 2002, recovery 2003 & 2004, resolved 2006
B-24D 41-40981 pilot Parran ditched August 17, 1943 3 MIA
B-24D 42-41043 pilot Harris MIA December 16, 1943
B-24D "Who's Next?" 42-41049 pilot Savage crashed Dec 7, 1944 remains recovered postwar, group burial 1949
B-24D 42-41066 pilot Lamos MIA October 2, 1943 11 missing
B-24D "Weezie" 42-41081 pilot Allred crashed March 22, 1944 discovered 1981, recovered 1982, case closed
B-24D "The Milk Run / Hit Parader" 42-41087 pilot Tilden MIA February 28, 1944
B-24D "The Dorothy Anne/ Not in Stock" 42-41093 pilot Lowe crashed March 20, 1944
B-24D "Battlin' Betts" 42-41099 pilot Martin crashed September 2, 1943
B-24D "Cold Steel" 42-41135 pilot Drewelow MIA March 5, 1944 found 79, recovery 88, resolved 2001
B-24D "Hot Garters" 42-41188 pilot Poulsen MIA April 10, 1944
B-24D "Punjab" 41-11902 pilot Meehan MIA Novemember 16-17, 1942
B-24D 42-41210 pilot Miller MIA November 10, 1943 wreckage discovered 1948, case status ?
B-24D "Heaven Can Wait" 42-41216 pilot Tennyson crashed March 11, 1944
B-24D "Sunshine I" 42-41225 pilot Jennings MIA March 8, 1944, 10 missing
B-24D "Louisiana Lullaby" 42-63986 pilot Hogland MIA June 11, 1944
B-25C 42-64571 pilot Wendling MIA October 12, 1943
B-24D 42-72800 pilot Carlson MIA October 25, 1943
B-24D "The Big Ass Bird II" 42-72801 pilot Martens MIA March 19, 1944, located postwar, 1 IDed, 15 group burial
B-24D "Ten Knights in a Bar Room" 42-72806 pilot Sheehan crashed Dec 1, 1943 discovery-recovery 1971, 3 missing
B-24D 42-72811 pilot Duvall MIA June 13, 1944, 11 missing
B-24D "Miss Deed" 42-72814 pilot O'Brien MIA November 6, 1943
B-24D 42-72899 pilot Buford MIA Feb 29, 1944 remains recovered 1944, 1982, some crew still listed MIA
B-24D 42-72800 pilot Carlson ditched October 25, 1943
B-24J "Here T'is" 42-72946 pilot Cooley MIA April 16, 1944 discovery/recovery 2002, case resolved 2006
B-24J "Doodlebug" 42-73117 pilot Smith crashed January 19, 1944 five KIA, bodies recovered.
B-24J 42-73185 pilot Dicker crashed June 19, 1944, 2 rescued, 9 missing, wreckage located.
B-24J "Super Mouse" 42-73338 pilot Taylor crashed April 9, 1944, 10 missing
B-24J "Paper Doll" 42-73187 pilot Van Wormer crashed January 19, 1944
B-24J 42-73197 pilot Mettes crashed June 14, 1944, 10 missing
B-24J "Patches" 42-73474 pilot O'Brien MIA April 20, 1945
B-24J 42-110000 pilot Stone crashed April 16, 1944 4 missing
B-24J "Blondes Away" 42-110006 pilot Pederson MIA August 5, 1944
B-24J 42-100180 pilot Barley ditched June 9, 1944, 4 rescued, 1 killed, 5 missing
B-24J 42-100225 pilot Paschal MIA April 16, 1944 discovery-recovery 2002, resolved September 2005
B-24J 42-100292 pilot Nellis crashed February 28, 1944 three located
B-24J 42-109981 pilot MacDonald crashed February 28, 1945, remains recovered 1979-1980, 1 missing
B-24J 44-40726 pilot Harry crashed October 25, 1944, 5 missing
B-24J 44-41258 pilot Cunningham MIA November 19, 1944 remains, wreckage known
B-24L 44-41481 pilot Kaiss MIA March 7, 1945
B-24L 44-41482 pilot Williams MIA June 6, 1945
B-24L 44-49480 pilot Brautigan crashed January 10, 1945

B-25C 41-12441 pilot Lowery MIA May 25, 1942
B-25C 41-12448 pilot Hesselbarth May 25, 1942
B-25C 41-12450 pilot Wilson MIA May 25, 1942
B-25C 41-12462 pilot Keel crashed May 23, 1942
B-25C "Hellzapopin II" 41-12464 pilot Dixon MIA February 18, 1944
B-25C "Der Schpy" 41-12470 pilot Schmidt crashed July 26, 1943 wreckage known, remains recovered, some still missing
B-25C "The Queen" 41-12472 pilot Heiss crashed September 4, 1942, 5 MIA
B-25C "Lounge Lizard / Not In Stock" 41-12483 pilot Doland MIA January 7, 1943
B-25C "Algernon IV" 41-12485 pilot Benn crashed January 18, 1943 discovery-recovery 1957, case resolved
B-25C "Miss Snafu" 41-12487 pilot Ingram MIA May 15, 1943
B-25C 41-12491 pilot Dickenson May 23, 1942, wreckage known
B-25C 41-12498 pilot Shearer ditched May 25, 1942, one MIA
B-25C "Boomerang" 41-12499 pilot Orr crashed August 25, 1942, six MIA
B-25C "El Aguila" 41-12515 pilot Rives MIA August 30, 1944 remains recovered postwar
B-25C "Aurora" 41-12792 pilot Bender crashed July 26, 1942 discovered 1945, remains recovered, group burial
B-25C "Yankee Vengeance" 41-12889 pilot May MIA October 23, 1942
B-25C "Tojo's Nitemare" 41-129?? pilot Barker ditched April 24, 1942 one survived, two recovered, three MIA
B-25C "The Happy Legend" 41-12907 pilot Pinkstaff MIA Dec 5, 1942 found 1943 recovery 1961-2005 resolved
B-25D "Geronimo" 41-12980 pilot Reid crashed June 21, 1943
B-25C 41-12981 pilot Moore MIA May 22, 1943, four missing
B-25C 41-12982 pilot Yeager crashed November 16, 1942, 2 missing
B-25C 41-12996 pilot Petersen crashed November 24, 1942 2 missing
B-25C "Tugboat Annie" 41-12998 pilot Mackey MIA November 2, 1943
B-25D "Torrid Tessie The Terror" 41-29692 pilot Atwell MIA May 22, 1944 known 1958, recovery, case resolved ?
B-25D "Battlin' Biffy" 41-29701 pilot Carey crashed October 5, 1942, two crew executed
B-25D 41-29733 pilot Blakemore MIA December 31, 1942
B-25D "Impatient Virgin" 41-30046 pilot Kizzire ditched November 27, 1943, three POW, all MIA
B-25D "Sunsetter's Son" 41-29707 pilot Menoher crashed December 1, 1942
B-25D "Royal Flush" 41-29708 pilot Brinkman January 7, 1943
B-25D "Jelly Belly" 41-30013 pilot Thompson ditched July 13, 1943 two missing
B-25D "Flying Ginny / Bette" 41-30017 pilot Whipple MIA October 5, 1943
B-25D "Hell's Belles" 41-30019 pilot Selby MIA June 16, 1944
B-25D "Pannell Job" 41-30024 pilot Pannell crashed June 11, 1944 one missing
B-25D "Miss Ellen" 41-30039 pilot Krasnickas MIA November 2, 1943
B-25D "Hit and Miss" 41-30040 pilot Foley MIA March 29, 1944
B-25D "SNAFU / MFUTU" 41-30054 pilot Anacker crashed October 18, 1943
B-25D "Sorry Satchul" 41-30056 pilot Peterson crashed October 18, 1943
B-25D "Lucky Bat" 41-30058 pilot Hotz MIA July 30, 1944
B-25D "Tin Liz" 41-30074 wreckage known since 1974
B-25D "Little Stinky" 41-30080 pilot Bailey crashed December 22, 1943, 4 missing
B-25D "Hung Lo" 41-30084 pilot Voitier crashed August 13, 1944
B-25D "Hellzapoppin" 41-30094 pilot Moore ditched November 2, 1943 crew POW, executed
B-25D 41-30117 pilot Cheli crashed August 18, 1943 three POW, executed
B-25D 41-30182 pilot Hurst MIA July 1, 1944 discovered 1940s, recovery 1980/1990s case resolved (date?)
B-25D "Lucky Star" 41-30183 pilot Moore ditched October 16, 1943
B-25D "Miss Ellen" 41-30185 pilot Anderson crashed March 19, 1944
B-25D 41-30221 pilot Uhler ditched August 2, 1943
B-25D 41-30247 pilot Schumacker MIA September 2, 1943
B-25D "Devils Enema" 41-30254 pilot Cabell MIA March 5, 1944, 6 missing
B-25D "The Ringmaster" 41-30259 pilot Erum MIA March 26, 1944
B-25D "Here's Howe" 41-30279 pilot Kyser MIA December 26, 1943
B-25D "Fifi" 41-30311 crashed November 2, 1943
B-25D 41-30313 pilot Webster ditched July 9, 1943 one missifng
B-25D "Tinkie" 41-30315 pilot Waggle MIA April 16, 1944
B-25D "Pissonit" 41-30370 pilot Benson ditched February 15, 1944 two MIA
B-24D "Available Jones" 41-30374 pilot Hartley crashed February 21, 1944
B-25D "We Dood It" 41-30376 discovery post war, recovery, more 2006, case resolved
B-25D "Reluctant Dragon" 41-30345 pilot Widener crashed August 28, 1943 three missing
B-25D 41-30496 pilot Ducci crashed July 27, 1943 two crew MIA
B-25D "Jelly Belly 2nd" 41-30516 pilot Thompson crashed September 9, 1943, postwar remains recovered, resolved
B-25D 41-30522 pilot Gullette crashed November 20, 1943, crew POW, remains recovered 1948, one MIA
B-25D "5 Minutes To Midnight" 41-30525 pilot Eddy MIA October 11, 1944
B-25D 41-30526 pilot Henrich crashed August 18, 1943
B-25D 41-30532 pilot Gerry crashed February 1, 1944
B-25D "Mexican Spitfire" 41-30592 pilot Bardwell crashed September 2, 1944
B-25D "Arkansas Traveler" 41-30594 pilot Manders MIA January 30, 1944
B-25D "Buzzin' Buzzard" 41-30632 pilot Adelman crashed March 10, 1944 (one recovered)
B-25D "Ole' Tomato" 41-30664 pilot Anderson crashed March 13, 1944 recovery 2001 case status ?
B-25D "Shifless Skonk" 41-30765 pilot Burnham MIA September 6, 1945
B-25D "Daisy Mae" 42-32262 pilot Campbell crashed October 18, 1943 one MIA
B-25C "RHIP" 42-32293 pilot Brooksby MIA July 14, 1943
B-25C "Stubborn Hellion" 42-32314 pilot Hochella ditched February 15, 1944, one MIA
B-25D "Toughy" 42-40525 pilot Terpning MIA May 7, 1944 remains recovered 1973 additional 2002-2008
B-25D 42-87286 pilot Braun MIA January 8, 1944
B-25D "The Mad Mizurian" 42-87297 pilot Hatcher crashed December 26, 1944
B-25D 43-3488 pilot Sieh September 30, 1944
B-25D pilot Tennille shot down June 8, 1944
B-25G 42-64807 pilot Bryant MIA January 21, 1944
B-25G 42-64846 pilot Jaebker crashed Nov 22, 1943 wreckage known, case resolved
B-25G 42-64850 pilot Smith crashed November 3, 1943, 5 MIA
B-25G 42-64835 pilot English force landed April 12, 1944 wreckage known
B-25G 42-64856 pilot Garrison MIA September 10, 1944
B-25G 42-64873 pilot Di Filippo crashed February 15, 1944
B-25G 42-64881 pilot Renshaw MIA January 28, 1944
B-25G 42-64889 pilot Wieland crashed November 27, 1943
B-25G 42-65142 pilot Carroll MIA November 12, 1944 three recovered, 5 missing
B-25D 42-87286 pilot Brown MIA February 6, 1944
B-25D 42-87287 pilot Spriggs MIA July 28, 1944, 9 missing, remains recovered
B-25H 43-4129 pilot Schmeisser MIA August 5, 1944, 4 missing
B-25H 43-4149 pilot Johnson MIA October 7, 1945, 2 missing
B-25H 43-4156 pilot Mackoy MIA December 22, 1944, 5 missing
B-25H 43-4178 pilot Lang MIA December 23, 1944
B-25H 43-4332 pilot Miller MIA August 1, 1944
B-25H 43-4341 pilot Dreger MIA September 2, 1944
B-25J "Pensive" 43-27888 pilot Simpson ditched April 3, 1945
B-25J "Lazy Daisy Mae" 43-36012 pilot Underwood MIA January 9, 1945 located 1963
B-25J 43-36161 pilot Simpson ditched January 6, 1945, 2 missing
B-25J 44-29350 pilot McGuire ditched March 30, 1945
B-25J 44-31300 pilot Neal ditched August 7, 1945 crew POW executed August 15, 1945, 5 missing
B-25 pilot Thompson ditched November 10, 1944 one missing

B-26 40-1402 pilot Royall MIA May 10, 1942
B-26 40-1408 pilot Thornbrough MIA June 4, 1942
B-26 "Yeah!" 40-1421 pilot Nicholson ditched January 7, 1943, 3 missing
B-26 "Satan's Playmate" 40-1424 pilot Mayes MIA June 4, 1942, 7 missing
B-26 40-1467 pilot Lanford MIA May 28, 1942, 7 missing
B-26 "Sally Rand" 40-1492 pilot Patteson ditched August 13, 1942, 1 missing
B-26 40-1529 pilot Anderson MIA December 17, 1942, 7 missing
B-26B "Dixie Belle" 41-17558 pilot Callaham MIA November 15, 1942, 7 missing
B-26B 41-17570 pilot Watson MIA June 4, 1942, 7 missing
B-26B 41-17590 pilot Otis MIA October 13, 1942, wreckage known, 5 missing

BT-13B 42-89612 pilot Wingo MIA January 14, 1945, 2 missing remains recovered

C-46D 42-101046 pilot Mathews MIA November 24, 1944
C-46D 44-77767 pilot Gordon crashed July 17, 1945, remains recovered, case resolved
C-46D 44-78490 pilot Zagata crashed October 10, 1945 remains recovered 1948, case resolved

C-47 "Maxine" 41-18585 pilot Cater MIA October 16, 1942 remains recovered & site closed 1999, case resolved
C-47 "Star Duster" 41-18648 pilot Gibson MIA Nov 21, 43 discovery 1948, remains recovered, case resolved
C-47 41-18661 pilot Gower crashed May 12, 1943 wreckage known, 4 missing
C-47 41-18668 pilot Cathcart crashed August 15, 1943 wreckage found 1950(?) case resolved
C-47 "Early Delivery" 41-38658 pilot Schwensen crashed Feb 6, 43 discovery 88, recovery 89, case resolved
C-47A "Windy City" 42-23500 pilot Chase crashed December 23, 1943 wreckage known
C-47A 42-23698 pilot Hutson crashed August 27, 1943
C-47A "Shakes All Over" 42-23705 pilot Davis MIA July 9, 1944 discovery-recovery prior 1950, case resolved
C-47A "Sure Skin" 42-23860 pilot Gennette crashed September 6, 1945, some remains recovered
C-47A 42-24215 pilot Campbell MIA Dec 10, 1944 discovery 75, recovery 79, 80, 04, case resolved 05
C-47A "Our Lillian Ethel Form 1A" 42-24228 pilot Hutchinson MIA March 6, 1944 recovery 1949, resolved
C-47A 42-92062 pilot Morrison MIA October 1, 1944
C-47A 42-93499 pilot Walker force landed September 25, 1944, 7 missing
C-47A 42-100479 pilot Fletcher crashed January 9, 1945 located March 11, 1945 remains recovered
C-47A "Windy City" 43-16011 pilot Kellogg MIA March 27, 1945, case unresolved
C-47A 43-16114 pilot Pomplun MIA December 24, 1944, case unresolved
C-47 43-16230 pilot Lair crashed June 22, 1945 wreckage known, 2 recovered, status ?
C-47A 43-30746 officially condemned on June 22, 1945

C-49 "Calamity Mary Jane" 41-7694 pilot Guest MIA April 8, 1943, 5 missing

DH.82A pilot Bevlock crashed September 10, 1942, 1 missing

F-4 41-2098 pilot Peterson MIA September 14, 1942
F-4 41-2098 pilot Peterson MIA September 14, 1942
F-4 "Hellapoppin Hepcat" 41-2137 pilot Murphy MIA June 26, 1943
F-4 41-2140 pilot Morton MIA March 16, 1943 wreckage discovered 1990s, no trace of pilot
F-4 "Dotin' Donna" 42-2177 pilot Blackard MIA May 21, 1943 found September 16, 1944, resolved
F-4 "Alice The Goon" 41-2209 pilot Erb MIA December 30, 1944, 1 missing
F-4 piloted Connelly MIA May 2, 1942
F-5A 42-13088 pilot Taylor MIA September 10, 1944
F-5B 42-67363 pilot Christian MIA March 3, 1944
F-5B 42-67360 pilot Copenhaver MIA March 5, 1944 located 1962, no remains found
F-5E 44-23227 pilot Eastman MIA August 18, 1944, discovery 1950, recovery 2004, 2008 case resolved
F-5E 44-24559 pilot Gillespie MIA June 7, 1945, 1 missing

F-6D 44-14621 pilot Lent crashed December 1, 1944, 1 missing
F-6D 44-14633 pilot Richards MIA December 4, 1944, 1 missing

F-7B 44-40422 pilot Harms MIA September 30, 1944
F-7B 44-40961 pilot Riley MIA January 11, 1945

P-38F 42-12623 pilot Faurot MIA March 3, 1943
P-38F 42-12633 pilot Eason MIA March 3, 1943
P-38F 42-12665 pilot Mangas MIA January 8, 1943
P-38G 42-12698 pilot Hays MIA October 13, 1943
P-38G "Beautiful Lass" 43-2204 pilot Powell MIA December 28, 1943
P-38G 42-12715 pilot Shifflet MIA March 3, 1943, 1 missing
P-38G 42-12848 piot Love MIA November 2, 1943 remains recovered 1999, identification pending from JPAC
P-38G 42-12850 piloted Fagan MIA September 6, 1943
P-38G 42-12856 pilot Wunder MIA October 13, 1943
P-38G "Veni Vidi Vici" 42-12705 pilot Craig crashed March 4, 1944
P-38G 43-2199 pilot Johnson MIA November 7, 1943
P-38G 43-2201 pilot Smith crashed August 20, 1943
P-38G 43-2203 pilot Evers MIA November 2, 1943
P-38G 43-2271 pilot Sibley MIA July 10, 1943
P-38G "Lil-De-Icer / G.I. Annie" 43-2386 pilot Gentile MIA November 7, 1943
P-38G 42-2387 pilot Planck ditched November 2, 1943 rescued February 5, 1944
P-38H "Porky II" 42-66506 pilot Cragg MIA December 26, 1943
P-38H 42-66523 pilot Bartlett MIA October 29, 1943
P-38H 42-66528 pilot Danson MIA March 14, 1944
P-38H 42-66532 pilot Haigler MIA November 13, 1943
P-38H 42-66534 pilot Weldon force landed January 18, 1944 wreckage recovered by salvagers 2003, 1 missing
P-38H 42-66539 pilot Danforth MIA January 23, 1944
P-38H 42-66542 pilot Phillips MIA September 8, 1943, 1 missing
P-38H 42-66545 pilot Robertson MIA January 18, 1944
P-38H "Charlcie Jeann II" 42-66546 pilot Meyer crashed November 9, 1943
P-38H 42-66547 pilot Garrison MIA September 22, 1943
P-38H 42-66554 pilot Ritter MIA January 18, 1944 wreckage located post war, 1 missing
P-38H 42-66555 pilot Mikucky MIA April 16, 1944
P-38H 42-66561 pilot Hagan MIA October 17, 1943
P-38H 42-66562 pilot Gronemeyer MIA Dec 31, 1944 located 1981, recovered, case resolved
P-38H 42-66563 pilot Adams MIA September 2, 1943
P-38H 42-66572 pilot Schmidt MIA August 18, 1943 wreckage located 1948, remains recovered, case resolved
P-38H 42-66593 pilot Smith MIA November 8, 1943
P-38H 42-66596 pilot Smith MIA November 9, 1943 case resolved 1950
P-38H 42-66631 pilot Myers MIA December 22, 1943
P-38H 42-66662 pilot Shea MIA November 2, 1943, 1 missing
P-38H 42-66665 pilot Richardson MIA November 2, 1943
P-38H 42-66668 pilot Smith MIA November 9, 1943 wreckage known
P-38H 42-66737 pilot Smith MIA November 16, 1943
P-38H 42-66743 pilot Hedrick MIA October 17, 1943
P-38H 42-66747 pilot Mayo MIA November 2, 1943
P-38H 42-66748 pilot Ryrholm MIA September 4, 1943 wreckage found 2005, remains recovered 2008, resolved
P-38H 42-66752 pilot Badgett MIA February 8, 1944
P-38H 42-66821 pilot Lutton MIA November 2, 1943
P-38H 42-66828 pilot Hawkins crashed June 23, 1944
P-38H 42-66857 pilot King MIA November 2, 1943
P-38H 42-66904 pilot Bateson MIA October 8, 1943
P-38H piloted by Corrigan MIA September 24, 1943, 1 missing
P-38H piloted by Weiss MIA March 19, 1944
P-38J 42-67142 pilot Donaldson MIA December 22, 1943 wreckage known, salvaged 2003, pilot remains listed as MIA, 1 missing
P-38J 42-67152 pilot Gidley MA January 23, 1944
P-38J 42-67584 pilot Barton MIA April 4, 1944
P-38J 42-67593 pilot Martin crashed June 11, 1944
P-38J 42-67605 pilot Luddington MIA April 16, 1944
P-38J 42-67793 pilot Crosswait MIA June 30, 1944 1 missing
P-38J 42-67802 pilot King MIA June 18, 1944
P-38J 42-103987 pilot Lynch MIA March 8, 1944, 1 missing
P-38J "Cillie" 42-104161 pilot O'Brien MIA August 4, 1944, 1 missing
P-38J 42-104385 pilot Neely MIA April 16, 1944
P-38J 42-104390 pilot Longman MIA April 16, 1944 wreckage found 2005, remains recovered 2009-2010, resolved
P-38J 43-28516 pilot Campbell MIA June 3, 1944, 1 missing
P-38J 43-28836 pilot Rittmayer crashed January 7, 1945, remains recovered 1948, case resolved
P-38J 44-23526 pilot Frank crashed September 11, 1944
P-38L"Putt Putt Maru III" 44-23843 pilot Condon MIA January 2, 1945
P-38L 44-23935 pilot Laseter MIA November 10, 1944, 1 missing
P-38L 44-24845 pilot McGuire crashed January 7, 1945, remains recovered 1948, case resolved
P-38L 44-24846 pilot Koeck crashed December 25, 1944, remains recovered 1946, case resolved
P-38L 44-24889 pilot Provencio crashed December 25, 1944
P-38L 44-25427 pilot Hill crashed January 31, 1945
P-38L 44-26538 pilot Stier crashed July 13, 1945
P-38L plot Everhart crashed October 12, 1944
P-38 pilot Feeham crashed August 21, 1943
P-38 pilot Guttel crashed August 21, 1943
P-38 pilot Krisher crashed August 21, 1943
P-38 "Nulli Secundus" pilot Ladd MIA October 15, 1944
P-38 pilot Bauhof crashed May 14, 1943
P-38 piloted by Lidstrom crashed October 16, 1943, remains recovered, case resolved
P-38 piloted by Levitan MIA March 2, 1943
P-38 piloted by McCarthy crashed July 21, 1943
P-38 piloted by Steele MIA July 16, 1943, 1 missing
P-38 piloted by Woodward MIA October 24, 1943, 1 missing

P-39D 41-6825 pilot Hooker MIA May 4, 1942
P-39D 41-6956 pilot Schwimmer MIA May 3, 1942
P-39D 41-6971 pilot Armstrong MIA May 4, 1942
P-39D 41-38339 pilot Brown MIA September 25, 1942
P-39D 41-38340 pilot Mac Donald MIA July 9, 1943
P-39F 41-7128 pilot Durand MIA April 30, 1942, 1 missing
P-39F 41-7136 pilot Rice MIA June 16, 1942
P-39F 41-7137 pilot Stauter MIA May 4, 1942
P-39F 41-7145 pilot Talbot MIA May 4, 1942, 1 missing
P-39F 41-7153 pilot Hawkins MIA May 27, 1942
P-39F 41-7165 pilot Berry crashed August 4, 1942
P-39F 41-7191 pilot Chapman crashed May 18, 1942 wreckage found 2001, pilot MIA
P-39F 41-7207 pilot Chivers MIA May 4, 1942, 1 missing
P-39F 41-7221 pilot Shultz MIA May 26, 1943
P-39K 42-4362 pilot Tucker MIA December 16, 1942
P-39N 42-18813 pilot Eggud MIA July 6, 1944
P-39Q 42-19933 pilot Starkey MIA August 13, 1944
P-39Q 42-19959 pilot Melville MIA October 28, 1943 near Bulldog, 1 missing, resolved
P-39Q 42-19987 pilot Pitonyak crashed October 28, 1943, wreckage located, remains recovered and identified 2016, case resolved
P-39Q 42-20031 pilot Fenn crashed October 28, 1943
P-39Q 42-20355 pilot Diffenderffer crashed April 9, 1944
P-39Q 42-19949 pilot Roberts MIA January 12, 1944 wreckage found postwar, remains buried, case unresolved, 1 missing
P-39Q 42-19999 pilot Sparks MIA July 3, 1944
P-39Q "Snooks" 42-20351 pilot Harrison crashed May 21, 1944
P-39Q 42-20353 pilot Rice MIA September 2, 1944
P-39Q 42-20357 pilot Ronning MIA September 2, 1944
P-39Q 44-3569 pilot Bailey MIA September 2, 1944
P-39 pilot McAlarney MIA January 23, 1944
P-39 pilot Magre crashed June 16, 1942 wreckage known, remains recovered, lost
P-39 piloted by Felker crashed December 3, 1942 remains recovered
P-39 piloted by Gillen crashed July 28, 1943
P-39 piloted by Voorhis MIA January 16, 1943

P-40E 41-5526 pilot McLaughlin MIA March 10, 1942 crash site located 1948, remains identified 2004
P-40E 41-5613 pilot Dittler MIA November 22, 1942
P-40E 41-5645 pilot Burnett MIA November 26, 1942
P-40E pilot Dennis MIA December 18, 1942
P-40E 41-24874 pilot Hazard MIA September 12 1942, 1 missing
P-40E 41-36173 pilot Wohlford MIA November 1, 1942
P-40N 42-105517 pilot Arnold crashed April 7, 1944
P-40N 42-105738 pilot Cash crashed March 22, 1944 remains recovered April 1944, resolved
P-40E pilot Voorhees MIA November 30, 1942
P-40E pilot Johnston MIA November 30, 1942
P-40 pilot Dewees MIA March 28, 1943
P-40E pilot Moose MIA April 3, 1943
P-40E pilot Hunter MIA April 3, 1943
P-40N pilot Crowley crashed January 23, 1944, 1 missing

P-400 AP290 pilot Dore crashed August 2, 1942
P-400 BX232 pilot Hague crashed August 2, 1942
P-400 BW105 pilot Hill MIA November 22, 1942
P-400 BW117 pilot Kirtland MIA July 11, 1942
P-400 AP359 pilot Potts MIA September 6, 1942
P-400 pilot Cottam MIA July 23, 1942
P-400 pilot Hunter crashed July 22, 1942 prisoner, executed
P-400 pilot Jackson crashed September 5, 1942

P-40E pilot Fish crashed April 27, 1942, 1 missing
P-40E pilot Voorhees MIA November 30, 1942
P-40E pilot Johnston MIA November 30, 1942
P-40N 42-105509 pilot Parker MIA November 15, 1943, 1 missing, resolved

P-47D 42-8059 discovered 1999, recovered & case resolved 1999
P-47D 42-8095 pilot Pratt MIA December 26, 1943
P-47D 42-8099 pilot Henderson MIA December 27, 1943, 1 missing
P-47D 42-8117 pilot Jacoby MIA October 22, 1943
P-47D "Fiery Ginger" 42-8145 pilot Ness MIA October 22, 1943
P-47D 42-22640 pilot Gilchrist MIA December 26, 1943
P-47D 42-22659 pilot Smith MIA August 6, 1944
P-47D 42-22661 pilot Thorpe MIA May 27, 1944
P-47D 42-22662 pilot Hartsfield MIA February 14, 1944
P-47D "Fiery Ginger IV" 42-22668 pilot Kearby crashed March 5, 1944 discovery 1946, case resolved 1949
P-47D 42-22687 pilot Lutes MIA April 29, 1944 aircraft located 1989, salvaged 2004, 1 missing
P-47D 42-22896 pilot Gaffney MIA March 11, 1944 discovered 1998, remains recovered, case resolved 1999
P-47D 42-22920 pilot Duncan MIA March 14, 1944
P-47D 42-22953 pilot Graham crashed April 11, 1944 remains recovered postwar, case resolved
P-47D 42-23208 pilot Cain crashed January 17, 1945
P-47D 42-23241 pilot Barker MIA September 30, 1944 wreckage located 1962, remains recovered 2012, case resolved 2015
P-47D 42-27866 pilot Frintner MIA August 4, 1944
P-47D 42-27848 pilot Bohman MIA August 4, 1944
P-47D 42-27993 pilot Ham MIA July 13, 1944
P-47D "Claire-Doll III" 42-28500 pilot Wiedmeyer MIA October 14, 1944
P-47D 42-28513 pilot Bailey crashed December 18, 1944 pilot POW / MIA
P-47D 42-75940 discovered 1991, recovered ?, case resolved 1995
P-47D 42-76033 pilot Gracey MIA June 14, 1944, 1 missing
P-47D 43-25481 pilot Hermann MIA April 30, 1945 wreckage found May 1985, case resolved
P-47D pilot Monast MIA December 16, 1944
P-47D "Nancie-A" 42-28493 pilot Prizzia MIA February 20, 1945
P-47D pilot McDougal MIA September 6, 1944, remains recovered still listed MIA
P-47D pilot Bissonnette MIA December 28, 1943
P-47D pilot Gerrity crashed March 11, 1944

P-51D 44-15199 pilot Yates MIA February 1, 1945, 1 missing
P-51D 44-63651 pilot Kirby crashed April 14, 1945, 1 missing
P-51D 44-??293 pilot Alexander crashed February 27, 1945
P-51D 44-??338 pilot Bollinger crashed February 27, 1945
P-51D piloted by Leinweber crashed June 10, 1945, 1 missing, remains recovered
P-51K 44-12054 pilot Kooper MIA March 13, 1945, 1 missing
P-51K 44-12075 pilot Wahlquist crashed May 3, 1945, 1 missing

P-61A 42-5515 pilot Daniel crashed November 18, 1944
P-61A 42-5562 pilot King crashed February 2, 1945, 1 missing

P-70 39-790 pilot Hornaday MIA May 7, 1943
P-70 42-54161 pilot Sutliff MIA October 22, 1944 wreckage known, JPAC recon 2004
P-70 42-33143 pilot Forrestal crashed April 2, 1944, discovered 1963, remains recovered 1964 case resolved ?

OA-10 Catalina 44-33889 pilot Carnegie MIA October 13, 1944, 9 missing
OA-10 Catalina 44-34050 pilot Drew MIA June 21, 1945, 12 missing
OA-10 pilot Matson MIA April 15, 1944, 7 missing


KL Auschwitz-Birkenau

All over the world, Auschwitz has become a symbol of terror, genocide, and the Holocaust. It was established by Germans in 1940, in the suburbs of Oswiecim, a Polish city that was annexed to the Third Reich by the Nazis. Its name was changed to Auschwitz, which also became the name of Konzentrationslager Auschwitz.

The direct reason for the establishment of the camp was the fact that mass arrests of Poles were increasing beyond the capacity of existing "local" prisons. The first transport of Poles reached KL Auschwitz from Tarnów prison on June 14, 1940. Initially, Auschwitz was to be one more concentration camp of the type that the Nazis had been setting up since the early 1930s. It functioned in this role throughout its existence, even when, beginning in 1942, it also became the largest of the extermination centers where the "Endlösung der Judenfrage" (the final solution to the Jewish question - the Nazi plan to murder European Jews) was carried out.

Division of the camp

The first and oldest was the so-called "main camp," later also known as "Auschwitz I" (the number of prisoners fluctuated around 15,000, sometimes rising above 20,000), which was established on the grounds and in the buildings of prewar Polish barracks

The second part was the Birkenau camp (which held over 90,000 prisoners in 1944), also known as "Auschwitz II" This was the largest part of the Auschwitz complex. The Nazis began building it in 1941 on the site of the village of Brzezinka, three kilometers from Oswiecim. The Polish civilian population was evicted and their houses confiscated and demolished. The greater part of the apparatus of mass extermination was built in Birkenau and the majority of the victims were murdered here

More than 40 sub-camps, exploiting the prisoners as slave laborers, were founded, mainly at various sorts of German industrial plants and farms, between 1942 and 1944. The largest of them was called Buna (Monowitz, with ten thousand prisoners) and was opened by the camp administration in 1942 on the grounds of the Buna-Werke synthetic rubber and fuel plant six kilometers from the Auschwitz camp. On November 1943, the Buna sub-camp became the seat of the commandant of the third part of the camp, Auschwitz III, to which some other Auschwitz sub-camps were subordinated.

Interessengebiet

The Germans isolated all the camps and sub-camps from the outside world and surrounded them with barbed wire fencing. All contact with the outside world was forbidden. However, the area administered by the commandant and patrolled by the SS camp garrison went beyond the grounds enclosed by barbed wire. It included an additional area of approximately 40 square kilometers (the so-called "Interessengebiet" - the interest zone), which lay around the Auschwitz I and Auschwitz II-Birkenau camps.

The local population, the Poles and Jews living near the newly-founded camp, were evicted in 1940-1941. Approximately one thousand of their homes were demolished. Other buildings were assigned to officers and non-commissioned officers from the camp SS garrison, who sometimes came here with their whole families. The pre-war industrial facilities in the zone, taken over by Germans, were expanded in some cases and, in others, demolished to make way for new plants associated with the military requirements of the Third Reich. The camp administration used the zone around the camp for auxiliary camp technical support, workshops, storage, offices, and barracks for the SS.


Eisenhower takes command - Jun 25, 1942 - HISTORY.com

TSgt Joe C.

Following his arrival in London, Major General Dwight D. Eisenhower takes command of U.S. forces in Europe. Although Eisenhower had never seen combat during his 27 years as an army officer, his knowledge of military strategy and talent for organization were such that Army Chief of Staff General George C. Marshall chose him over nearly 400 senior officers to lead U.S. forces in the war against Germany. After proving himself on the battlefields of North Africa and Italy in 1942 and 1943, Eisenhower was appointed supreme commander of Operation Overlord–the Allied invasion of northwestern Europe.

Born in Denison, Texas, in 1890, Eisenhower graduated from the United States Military Academy in 1915. Out of a remarkable class that was to produce 59 generals, Eisenhower ranked 61st academically and 125th in discipline out of a total of 164 graduates. As a commissioned officer, his superiors soon took note of his organizational abilities, and appointed him commander of a tank training center after the U.S. entrance into World War I in 1917. In October 1918, he received the orders to take the tanks to France, but the war ended before they could sail. Eisenhower received the Distinguished Service Medal but was disappointed that he had not seen combat.

Between the wars, he steadily rose in the peacetime ranks of the U.S. Army. From 1922 to 1924, he was stationed in the Panama Canal Zone, and in 1926, as a major, he graduated from the Army’s Command and General Staff School at Fort Leavenworth, Kansas, at the top of a class of 275. He was rewarded with a prestigious post in France and in 1928 graduated first in his class from the Army War College. In 1933, he became aide to Army Chief of Staff General Douglas MacArthur, and in 1935 he went with MacArthur to the Philippines when the latter accepted a post as chief military adviser to that nation’s government.

Promoted to the rank of lieutenant colonel while in the Philippines, Eisenhower returned to the United States in 1939 shortly after World War II began in Europe. President Franklin Roosevelt began to bring the country to war preparedness in 1940 and Eisenhower found himself figuring prominently in a rapidly expanding U.S. Army. In March 1941, he was made a full colonel and three months later was appointed commander of the 3rd Army. In September, he was promoted to brigadier general.

After the United States entered World War II in December 1941, Army Chief of Staff Marshall appointed Eisenhower to the War Plans Division in Washington, where he prepared strategy for an Allied invasion of Europe. Promoted to major general in March 1942 and named head of the operations division of the War Department, he advised Marshall to create a single post that would oversee all U.S. operations in Europe. Marshall did so and on June 11 surprised Eisenhower by appointing him to the post over 366 senior officers. On June 25, 1942, Eisenhower arrived at U.S. headquarters in London and took command.

In July, Eisenhower was appointed lieutenant general and named to head Operation Torch, the Allied invasion of French North Africa. As supreme commander of a mixed force of Allied nationalities, services, and equipment, Eisenhower designed a system of unified command and rapidly won the respect of his British and Canadian subordinates. From North Africa, he successfully directed the invasions of Tunisia, Sicily, and the Italian mainland, and in December 1943 was appointed Supreme Allied Commander of the Allied Expeditionary Force. Operation Overlord, the largest combined sea, air, and land military operation in history, was successfully launched against Nazi-occupied Europe on June 6, 1944. On May 7, 1945, Germany surrendered. By that time, Eisenhower was a five-star general.

After the war, Eisenhower replaced Marshall as army chief of staff and from 1948 to 1950 served as president of Columbia University. In 1951, he returned to military service as supreme commander of the North Atlantic Treaty Organization (NATO). Pressure on Eisenhower to run for U.S. president was great, however, and in the spring of 1952 he relinquished his NATO command to run for president on the Republican ticket.

In November 1952, “Ike” won a resounding victory in the presidential elections and in 1956 was reelected in a landslide. A popular president, he oversaw a period of great economic growth in the United States and deftly navigated the country through increasing Cold War tensions on the world stage. In 1961, he retired with his wife, Mamie Doud Eisenhower, to his farm in Gettysburg, Pennsylvania, which overlooked the famous Civil War battlefield. He died in 1969 and was buried on a family plot in Abilene, Kansas.


On to Insurance – and Other Industries

Warren Buffet’s first insurance company purchase for Berkshire Hathaway was the National Indemnity Co., in 1970. A few years later, Berkshire took a swing again, buying up an equity stake in Government Employees Insurance Company, better known to millions of advertising consumers as GEICO.

Berkshire perfected the art of using so-called float money from insurance claims (money owed but not paid until claims were settled) to begin investing in other industries. Aside from textiles and insurance, the 1970s and 1980s saw Berkshire purchase stakes in companies in industries as diverse as candy/confectionaries and gas and utility companies.

Along with Munger, who came aboard with Berkshire Hathaway in the 1970s, Buffett continued to focus on companies with stable, almost predictable long-term growth, while shying away from what everyone else (i.e., the herd) was doing on Wall Street – buying stocks based on assets and cash flow, and in somewhat speculative industries.

Buffett practiced what he preached, only taking an annual salary of $100,000 annually, with no stock options, along with a promise to donate his stock market wealth to charity. His shareholders lapped it all up, taking in, on average, 21% yearly as Berkshire shareholders from 1965 to 2006, and enjoying the ride with one of the most charismatic stock pickers of this or any other generation.

By late 2007, Berkshire 𠇊-class” shares were going for $150,000 apiece, and continued its tradition of not splitting its shares, a philosophy stemming from Buffet and Munger’s desire for consistent long-term gains over short-term speculative investment practices. By 2017, share prices stood at $250,000 per share – an amazing figure especially given the fact that Berkshire’s headquarters were staffed with only 25 employees.

Particularly enticing to shareholders, and to the business media, were Berkshire Hathaway’s annual shareholder’s meetings, which routinely gather 20,000 or more company shareholders, all edging closer to Buffett and Munger hoping – and usually getting – pearls of wisdom on investment, ice cream, and the simple life, in general.


25 June 1942 - History

Joseph Cullen Root was the founder of ( MWA) Modern Woodmen of The World in 1882. This original fraternal organization only operated in 9 of the central western states, By 1890 , Mr. Root was dissatisfied with MWA (Modern Woodmen of America) and left it to organize Woodmen of the World . According to their brochure and brief history they sent this is what they have to say about the origins or forming such organizations.

When Joseph Cullen Root founded Woodmen , he envisioned an organization dedicated to helping its fellow man . Its purpose was "to minister to the afflicted to relieve distress to cast a sheltering arm about the defenseless living . to encourage broad charitable views. "

Lifestyles have changed since Root wrote those goals into the Objectives of Woodcraft , but fraternalism remains strong . "The objects of Woodcraft have always exemplified love, honor and remembrance, "said Executive Vice President Wayne Graham, the director of the Society's fraternal programs. "Fraternalists are concerned with helping others, promoting patriotism and civic responsibility , and providing financial protection for their families.

Today , Woodmen members do not simply share the fact that they have purchased insurance or annuities through the same organization . Woodmen is a fraternal benefit society , with members connected by their membership and also their desire to better their lives, their families' lives and their communities.

Woodmen is a nonprofit organization , owned and governed by its members. Delegates are elected from 2,600 local lodges to jurisdictional (state) conventions and then to the National Convention. These national delegates elect members to the Board of Directors to four -year terms of office where they help to determine policies and directions of the society.

The development of the fraternal beneficiary system in America was actuated by the same desires which prompted its organization in the Old World.Societies had been organized and disbanded one after another , until the organization of the Ancient Order of United Workmen was perfected by John Jordon Upchurch at Madville , Pennsylvania , on October 27, 1868.

Mr. Joseph Root founded the society in Omaha , Nebraska , which is still one of their main offices. Until 1957 Woodmen did not admit women and girls to the society. The financial statement as of Dec 31, 1891 listed Membership at 5,461 . The first certificate of membrship was issued to Wm. A. McCully , Camp #1, Independence , Kansas , on Dec 29, 1890. The first Camp charter was issued to Alpha Camp #1, Omaha , Nebraska , Jan 10 1891. This lodge is still in existence.

The first death claim paid was that of Willie O. Warner , who drowned June 14, 1891, in Niles , Michigan . In 1910 , a class of 7,800 candidates was initiated at Louisville, Ky. From 1909- 1947 , 12,000 members with tuberculosis received free care at the Modern Woodmen Sanatorium in Woodmen ,COL.

At one time in its history , WOW did offer grave monuments to families of deceased members. Sometimes these monuments have the motto Dum Tacet Clamat, which means "Though silent, he speaks , " etched on the stone.

For a brochure on the history of Modern Woodmen of America , you can write: Modern Woodmen of America, 1701 1st. Avenuw, P.O. Box 2005, Rock Island, Ill. 61204-2005

For their "Woodmen And Fraternalism" brochure , try Woodmen Tower, 1700 Farnam St., Omaha , NE 68102.


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