Quartermaster Corps

Quartermaster Corps


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Derived from the old French quartier and the latin quartaurius, quartermaster means master of quarters; one who goes ahead to provide lodging or quarters for those who are to follow.The Quartermaster Corps traces its origins to June 16, 1775. Following General Washington’s address accepting command of the Continental Army, the Second Continental Congress passed a resolution "providing one Quartermaster General" of the grand army and one deputy under him for a separate army. Major General Thomas Mifflin, a 32-year-old Philadelphia merchant, was the first known quartermaster general.The surprise Japanese attack on Pearl Harbor in December 1941 put the nation at war for the second time in just over two decades. World War II spawned combat all over the globe in multiple theaters of operation. No other area proved to be more challenging than the war in the Pacific Theater with its lengthy supply lines.Needed were masses of trained personnel with purchasing, inspection and supply-management skills, coupled with effective administrative procedures and inventory techniques. The demanding course was not entered into lightly: eleven weeks of academic training and six weeks of field maneuvers, plus military training in the midst of war lay ahead for the recruit.The Quartermaster Officer Candidate Schools strongly emphasized that quality and individual attention be given to each student during training. The courses were attended by officers from several foreign countries: Great Britain, Canada, the Philippines, China, Mexico, Peru, Venezuela, and Brazil, as well as other Latin American countries.The Quartermaster School instructors were carefully chosen and trained. Teaching large numbers of servicemen, in the shortest possible time, proved to be a difficult task.The first step in the Quartermasters' duties was procurement, which required more than simply calculating user needs and filling out the correct requisitions. Further complicating matters was the fact that manufacturing and agricultural production had to be increased immediately.Quartermaster corpsmen provided Class I, II, III and IV items to the war front.Class I: foodA steady supply of food and rations was most vital to the survival of the far-flung armed forces. During much of the war the Pacific Theater experienced heavy losses of food, resulting in random cycles of "feast and famine." Food losses stemmed from a number of sources, the first being storage problems. To rectify that problem, the corpsmen created portable warehouses called "Paulin Oases," which resembled a native hut called a bures.Packaging problems were extremely challenging because food supplies were roughly handled, dropped from airplanes, sling-loaded and dumped into huge cargo holds — causing tremendous losses. Quartermaster receiving and distributing (R&D) specialists worked on producing moisture- and insect-resistant paper sacks for the various food products.Distribution problems were next on the list and proved to be the most difficult. The R & D specialists developed a simpler plan to meet the specialized needs and unique requirements of the fighting troops.The A-ration, fresh food; and B-ration, canned food, needed to be cooked — not always possible in combat situations. K-rations were high-energy chocolate bars, used only in emergencies.Class II: clothingQuartermasters in the Pacific had trouble getting sufficient reserves of clothing where it was needed, mainly because the U.S. After the clothing did arrive, it usually went into base storage areas — sometimes disintegrating as a result of devastating environmental effects.Class III: petroleum productsEssential to the war effort were gasoline, kerosene, aviation fuel, diesel oil, fuel oil and petroleum-based lubricants. Heavy and bulky, they defied easy handling, but the Quartermaster efforts to furnish Class III supplies were judged to be an overall success.Class IV: general suppliesSuch diverse items as rope, soap, candles, knives, forks and spoons rarely warranted "life or death" status. A procurement problem on the home front — the inability of the manufacturers to meet demand with supply — was the main reason for delays.Time after time, Quartermaster supply personnel demonstrated the "whatever works" approach and diligently pulled it off. Faced with extremely unusual circumstances, plus finding that they often lacked basic items or equipment, the Quartermasters in the Pacific improvised and became known as "QM Imps." They effectively carried out supply operations through careful planning, and lessons learned from previous assaults on the enemy.The Quartermaster Corps trained thousands of soldiers during World War II, filling specialized roles in every theater of operation from the Pacific and China-Burma-India theaters to North Africa, Italy, central and northern Europe. They also incorporated the help of K-9 Corps with 15 platoons serving overseas during World War II. The dogs were used to detect the enemy's presence, transfer messages, and detect mines.Using strategic anticipation and successful island-hopping techniques, the Quartermaster corpsmen accomplished what they had set out to do, making ultimate victory possible. They applied every conceivable means available to distribute essential supplies to the servicemen, often at the ultimate cost.


Quartermaster

Quartermaster is a military term, the meaning of which depends on the country and service. In land armies, a quartermaster is generally a relatively senior soldier who supervises stores or barracks and distributes supplies and provisions. In many navies, a quartermaster is an officer with particular responsibility for steering and signals. The seaman is a non-commissioned officer (petty officer) rank in some others, it is not a rank but a role related to navigation.

The term appears to derive from the title of a German royal official, the Quartiermeister. This term meant "master of quarters" (where "quarters" refers to lodging or accommodation). Alternatively, it could have been derived from "master of the quarterdeck" where the helmsman and captain controlled the ship. The term's first use in English was as a naval term, which entered English in the 15th century via the equivalent French and Dutch naval titles quartier-maître and kwartier-meester, respectively. The term began to refer to army officers in English around 1600.


Records of the office of the Quartermaster General [OQMG]

Established: In the War Department, to head the Quartermaster Corps (QMC), effective July 15, 1920, by General Order 42, War Department, July 14, 1920, which implemented relevant provisions of the National Defense Act of 1920 (41 Stat. 766), June 4, 1920 restored the traditional name of the office and assigned to it those quartermaster functions exercised by the Construction Division, Motor Transport Corps, Transportation Service, Purchase and Storage Service, and Real Estate Service.

Predecessor Agencies:

In the War Department, except as noted below:

Quartermaster Functions:

(1) Transportation and Supply

Quartermaster's Department (QMD, 1812-42):

  • Individual quartermasters assigned to each army (1812-16)
  • OQMG, Division of the North (1816-18)
  • OQMG, Division of the South (1816-18)
  • OQMG (1818-42)
  • Office of the Secretary of the Treasury (1792-95)
  • Office of the Purveyor of Public Supplies (OPPS), Department of the Treasury (1795-98 to War Department, 1798)
  • OPPS (1798-1812)
  • Office of the Commissary General of Purchases (OCGP, 1812-42)

(4) Transportation and Supply

Subsistence Functions:

Pay Functions:

  • Office of the Paymaster of the Army (1792-1816)
  • Office of the Paymaster General (OPG, 1816-1912)

Consolidated Quartermaster, Subsistence, and Pay Functions:

Construction Functions:

  • Cantonment Division, Operations Division, War Department General Staff (WDGS, 1918)
  • Construction Division (1918-20)

Transportation Functions:

  • Embarkation Service, WDGS (overseas only, 1917)
  • Embarkation Service, Storage and Traffic Service (S&TS), WDGS (1917-18)
  • Embarkation Service, Storage and Traffic Division (S&TD), WDGS (1918)
  • Embarkation Service, Purchase, Storage and Traffic Division (PS&TD), WDGS (1918-19)
  • Division of Inland Transportation, S&TS, WDGS (1918)
  • Division of Inland Transportation, S&TD, WDGS (1918)
  • Division of Inland Transportation, PS&TD, WDGS (1918)
  • Inland Traffic Service, PS&TD, WDGS (1918-19)
  • Transportation Service, PS&TD, WDGS (consolidated overseas and inland, 1919)
  • Transportation Service (1919-20)

Motor Transport Procurement and Operation Functions:

General Procurement Functions:

  • Office of the Director of Purchase (ODP),
  • Office of the Director of Purchase and Storage (ODPS), PS&TD, WDGS (1918-19)
  • Purchase Service (PS), Purchase and Storage Service (P&SS) (1919-20)

Storage and Distribution Functions:

  • Office of the Director of Storage (ODS), ODPS, PS&TD, WDGS (1918-19)
  • Storage Service (SS), P&SS (1919-20)

Cemeterial Functions:

  • Cemeterial Branch, General Administrative Division (GAD), ODPS,
  • PS&TD, WDGS (1918-19)
  • Cemeterial Branch, GAD, P&SS (1919-20)
  • Cemeterial Division, P&SS (1920)

Real Estate Functions:

  • Real Estate Unit, Purchase Section, Purchase and Supply Branch,
  • PS&TD, WDGS (1918)
  • Real Estate Section, Facilities Department, PS&TD, WDGS (1918-19)
  • Real Estate Service (1919-20)

Transfers: To Services of Supply (SOS), effective March 9, 1942, by Circular 59, War Department, March 2, 1942, as part of a War Department reorganization authorized by EO 9082, February 28, 1942 to Army Service Forces (ASF, formerly SOS) by General Order 14, War Department, March 12, 1943 to Director of Service, Supply, and Procurement (DSSP), WDGS, as a technical service, effective June 11, 1946, upon abolishment of ASF by Circular 138, War Department, May 14, 1946, as part of a War Department reorganization authorized by EO 9722, May 13, 1946 with WDGS (redesignated Army Staff) to Department of the Army (DA) by Circular 1, DA, September 18, 1947, implementing Circular 225, War Department, August 16, 1947, issued pursuant to a reorganization of the armed services under the National Security Act of 1947 (61 Stat. 495), July 26, 1947 to Director of Logistics (DL, formerly DSSP), Army Staff, by Circular 57, DA, March 4, 1948 to Assistant Chief of Staff, G-4 Logistics (ACS, G-4, formerly DL), Army Staff, by Special Regulation 10-5-1, DA, April 11, 1950 to Deputy Chief of Staff for Logistics (formerly ACS, G-4), Army Staff, by General Order 66, DA, September 8, 1954. Functions: Supplied the army with clothing, subsistence, and general purpose equipment. Supervised the disposition of excess and salvaged supplies. Performed duties related to the disposition of combat dead, including maintaining the national cemeteries.

Responsibility for procuring land for the army, and for constructing and maintaining military buildings and utilities, transferred to Office of the Chief of Engineers, 1941. Responsibility for transporting troops and supplies transferred to Transportation Division, SOS, 1942. Responsibility for procuring general purpose automotive vehicles transferred to Ordnance Department, SOS, 1942.

Joint service logistical responsibilities transferred to Defense Supply Agency, Department of Defense (DOD), effective January 1, 1962, by DOD Directive 5105.22, November 6, 1961.

Abolished: Effective August 1, 1962, by General Order 44, DA, July 23, 1962.

Successor Agencies: Office of the Chief of Support Services, Army Staff (staff responsibilities) U.S. Army Materiel Command (command responsibilities).

Finding Aids: Maizie H. Johnson, comp., &Preliminary Inventory of the Textual Records of the Office of the Quartermaster General,& NM 81 (Part I, Headquarters, 1967), and NM 85 (Part II, Field Activities, 1967) supplement in National Archives microfiche edition of preliminary inventories.

Security-Classified Records: This record group may include material that is security-classified.

Related Records: Record copies of publications of the Office of the Quartermaster General, the Quartermaster Corps, and the Quartermaster Department in RG 287, Publications of the U.S. Government. Records of the Office of the Chief of Engineers, RG 77.
War Department Collection of Revolutionary War Records, RG 93. Records of the Office of the Paymaster General, RG 99.
Records of the Confederate Quartermaster Department, in RG 109, War Department Collection of Confederate Records. Records of Headquarters Army Service Forces, RG 160.
Records of the War Department General and Special Staffs, RG 165.
Records of the Office of the Commissary General of Subsistence, RG 192. Records of the Office of the Chief of Finance (Army), RG 203.
Records of the Accounting Officers of the Department of the Treasury, RG 217. Records of the Army Staff, RG 319.
Records of the Office of the Chief of Transportation, RG 336.

92.2 Records of the Office of the Commissary General of Purchases
1794-1843

92.2.1 General records

History: Office of the Purveyor of Public Supplies (OPPS), headquartered at Philadelphia, PA, established in Treasury Department by an act of February 23, 1795 (1 Stat. 419), with responsibility for procuring all U.S. Government supplies, including military stores. Abolished, effective May 31, 1812, by an act of March 28, 1812 (2 Stat. 696), with army procurement functions transferred to War Department and assigned to newly established Office of the Commissary General of Purchases (OCGP), headquartered in Philadelphia, PA. OCGP abolished by an act of August 23, 1842 (5 Stat. 512), with functions transferred to OQMG. See 92.3.

Textual Records: Letters sent, 1800-42. Journals, 1812-43. Bank books, 1800-5, 1811-20, 1823-38. Records relating to estimates and expenditures, 1801-42. Combined OPPS and OCGP records, including letters sent and received, reports, and statements of account (&Coxe and Irvine Papers&), 1794-1842. Records of other Philadelphia military supply offices, 1794-1842.

92.2.2 Records of the Office of the Superintendent of Military
Stores

History: Office of the Superintendent of Military Stores (OSMS), headquartered in Philadelphia, PA, established in War Department by an act of April 2, 1794, (1 Stat. 352), with responsibility for storing, distributing, and accounting for military stores. Storage and distribution functions transferred to Office of the Commissary General of Purchases (OCGP) by a letter of the Secretary of War to the OCGP, January 30, 1813. OSMS abolished by an act of March 3, 1813 (2 Stat. 816), with remaining accounting functions transferred to newly established Office of the Superintendent General of Military Supplies (OSGMS), headquartered in Washington, DC. OSGMS abolished, with functions transferred to Treasury Department and assigned to newly established Office of the Second Auditor, under Office of the Second Comptroller, by an act of March 3, 1817 (3 Stat. 366).

Textual Records: Letters sent, 1807-9. Journals, 1796-1813. Cash receipt book, 1801-26, containing entries by Brig. Gen. William Irvine, Superintendent of Military Stores (1801-4) and by Callender Irvine, Superintendent of Military Stores (1804-12) and Commissary General of Purchases (1812-41). Miscellaneous inventories and statements of account, 1797-1813.

92.3 General Records of the Office of the Quartermaster General
1774-1962

History: Established in the War Department, to head QMD, by an act of April 14, 1818 (3 Stat. 426). Acquired supply functions from OCGP, 1842. (See 92.2.) Combined with OCGS and OPG to form OCQMC, pursuant to the army appropriation act for FY 1913 (37 Stat. 591), August 24, 1912, consolidating QMD with Subsistence Department and Pay Department to form QMC and redesignating Quartermaster General (QMG) as Chief, QMC. OCQMC redesignated OQMG pursuant to the army appropriation act for FY 1915 (38 Stat. 356), April 27, 1914, redesignating Chief, QMC as QMG.

Following U.S. declaration of war against Germany, April 6, 1917, and Austria-Hungary, December 7, 1917, Cantonment Division of OQMG, responsible for army construction, transferred to WDGS and assigned to Operations Division, February 9, 1918 redesignated Construction Division and made a separate War Department unit, March 13, 1918. (For additional administrative history, SEE 92.7.) Pursuant to establishment of PS&TD in WDGS by General Order 36, War Department, April 16, 1918, Transportation Division of OQMG terminated by transfer of Water Transport Branch to Embarkation Service, PS&TD, May 25, 1918 and Land Transport Branch to Inland Traffic Service, PS&TD, June 8, 1918. (For additional administrative history, see 92.5.3.) Motor Transport Service of OQMG redesignated Motor Transport Corps and made a separate War Department unit, August 15, 1918. (For additional administrative history, see 92.6.3.) Pursuant to establishment in PS&TD of Office of the Director of Purchase and Storage (ODPS), with subordinate Offices of Director of Purchase (ODP) and Director of Storage (ODS), by Supply Circular 91, PS&TD, September 12, 1918, all OQMG procurement units transferred to ODP by Notice 145, OQMG, September 18, 1918 and all OQMG storage and distribution units to ODS by Notice 147, OQMG, September 18, 1918. (For additional administrative history, see 92.4.4.) Finance and Accounts Division of OQMG, whose responsibilities included paying the army, transferred, October 21, 1918, to Finance Service, newly established under Office of the Director of Finance, PS&TD, by Supply Circular 98, PS&TD, October 11, 1918. Administrative Division of OQMG, including Cemeterial Branch, transferred to ODPS and redesignated General Administrative Division, October 28, 1918. Remount Division of OQMG transferred to ODP and redesignated Remount Purchase Division, October 28, 1918. Personnel Division of OQMG transferred to Administrative Branch of PS&TD and redesignated Personnel Section, December 6, 1918, thereby rendering OQMG inactive.

Embarkation Service consolidated with Inland Traffic Service to form Transportation Service, March 11, 1919 made a separate War Department unit, April 21, 1919. ODPS redesignated Purchase and Storage Service (P&SS), and made a separate War Department unit, April 11, 1919, with subordinate ODP redesignated Purchase Service (PS) and ODS redesignated Storage Service (SS). See 92.1.

92.3.1 General correspondence

Textual Records: Letters sent, 1818-83, with partial indexes. Letters received, 1819-73, with partial registers and indexes. Subject correspondence (&Consolidated Correspondence File&), 1794-1890, with partial index. Subject correspondence (&Special Subject Files&), 1862-95, with partial register. Subject-numeric correspondence, 1890-1914, with record cards and indexes. Security-classified and unclassified decimal correspondence, 1914-61, with separate project files, 1922-35.

Microfilm Publications: M745.

Photographic Prints (229 images): Monuments, vehicles, heavy equipment, construction of buildings, army troops embarking for Havana (Spanish-American War), and Red Cross workers (Spanish- American War), 1874-1914 (DF). See also 92.17.

Posters (2 images): Army recruitment, 1905, 1907 (DF). See also 92.17.

92.3.2 Issuances

Textual Records: OQMG general and special orders, circulars, regulations, and office orders, 1832-36, 1860-79, 1904-25, 1944- 61. Issuances received from other War Department organizations, 1818-67.

92.3.3 Reports

Textual Records: Copies of annual reports of OQMG to Secretary of War, 1842-43, 1850, 1861-66, 1870-71, 1873, 1875-76, 1878-1911, 1913-14, 1916-20. Annual and other reports of quartermaster (QM) officers received in OQMG, 1863-70, 1872-80, 1882-86. Reports on persons and articles hired by QMD, 1818-1913, with partial registers and indexes. Annual historical summaries of selected QM installations received in OQMG, 1959-62.

92.3.4 Records maintained by individual quartermasters

Textual Records: Letters sent and received, reports, and other records of the following Quartermasters General: Brig. Gen. Thomas S. Jesup, 1826-56 Brig. Gen. Montgomery C. Meigs, 1861- 79 Brig. Gen. Samuel B. Holabird, 1889-90 Brig. Gen. Richard N. Batchelder, 1890-95 Maj. Gen. James B. Aleshire, 1894-1916 and Maj. Gen. Harry Lovejoy Rogers, 1919-23. Letters sent and received, reports, and other records of individual quartermasters and assistant quartermasters, 1779, 1792-94, 1797, 1799-1800, 1813-14, 1819-1913.

92.3.5 Other records

Textual Records: Letters, memorandums, and abstracts relating to policy decisions, 1833-1914, with partial indexes. Reference files, 1774-1920. QM Department rosters, registers, manuals, and other publications, 1832-1920. Compilation of reports, returns, and accounting records relating to QM activities during the Mexican War, 1845- 49. Letters sent and other records of the Quartermaster, Boston, MA, 1819-38 (in Boston). Letters, issuances, and reports of the Headquarters Office Battalion, 1864-65. Correspondence and reports relating to OQMG organization, 1865-1911. Records of Colonel Edmund B. Whitman relating to quartermaster functions performed in conjunction with the identification of Union war dead and the subsequent establishment and maintenance of national cemeteries, 1863-69. Miscellaneous special reports, 1916-23. War history of the Office of the Zone Supply Officer, New York, NY, 1917-19 (in New York). Record set of QMC publications, 1944-47. Records relating to the food service program, 1943-45. Records of QMC participation in DOD program of single-service management, throughout the armed forces, of each commodity and service (&Single Manager Plan&), 1955-61. Security-classified correspondence relating to the Mutual Defense Assistance Program, 1955-61. Records relating to QMC records management, 1953-62. Management studies, 1944-58.

92.4 Records of Supply Organizations
1818-1963

92.4.1 General records

Textual Records: Lists and returns showing supplies purchased, issued, and on hand, 1818-73. Copies and abstracts of contracts, with related letters sent and received, 1819-1912. Copies of civilian supply shipments, 1948-49.

92.4.2 Records of the Regular Supplies Branch

History: First Division (Public Animals) and Fifth Division (Regular Supplies) established by General Order 62, OQMG, December 23, 1864, implementing a QMD reorganization act (13 Stat. 394), July 4, 1864. Respectively acquired responsibilities, previously assigned to individual staff officers, for procuring and distributing horses and draft animals and forage, fuel, and miscellaneous cantonment supplies. Consolidated, and designated Regular Supplies Branch, pursuant to Special Order 20, OQMG, August 19, 1867, replacing OQMG divisional structure with branches. Assigned, with Transportation Branch (SEE 92.5.2) to newly established Supply and Transportation Division, 1895. Following abolition of Supply and Transportation Division and elevation of Transportation Branch to divisional status by General Order 122, War Department, August 18, 1898, Regular Supplies Branch functioned independently as a branch, 1898-1911. Responsibility for animals transferred to Transportation Division, about 1908. Regular Supplies Branch redesignated Miscellaneous Supplies Branch and assigned to newly established Supplies Division, effective March 1, 1911, by an unnumbered OQMG memorandum, March 2, 1911, reorganizing OQMG. See 92.4.4.

Textual Records: Records relating to animals, consisting of letters sent, 1863-69 letters received, 1863-69, with partial register and miscellaneous lists and reports, 1863-68. Records relating to forage, fuel, and miscellaneous supplies, consisting of letters sent, 1864-89, with partial indexes and letters received, 1865-90, with partial abstracts and indexes. Monthly reports and returns concerning animals, 1840-70. Monthly forage reports, 1850-70. Miscellaneous lists, reports, and returns, 1836, 1853-1908.

92.4.3 Records of the Clothing and Equipage Branch

History: Second Division (Clothing and Equipage) established by General Order 62, OQMG, December 23, 1864, implementing QMD reorganization act of July 4, 1864. Acquired responsibility, previously assigned to individual staff officers, for procuring, storing, and distributing army clothing and personal equipment. Redesignated Clothing and Equipage Branch pursuant to Special Order 20, OQMG, August 19, 1867, replacing OQMG divisional structure with branches. Redesignated Clothing Supply Branch and assigned to newly established Correspondence and Examining Division, 1895. Following abolishment of that division, 1898, Clothing Supply Branch (also known as Clothing and Equipage Supply Branch) functioned as an independent branch, 1898-1911. Assigned to newly established Supplies Division, effective March 1, 1911, by an unnumbered OQMG memorandum, March 2, 1911, reorganizing OQMG. See 92.4.4.

Textual Records: Letters sent, 1827-89, with partial indexes. Letters received, 1821, 1832-89, with partial registers and indexes. Correspondence, 1890, with record cards and indexes. Weekly and monthly reports from depots and posts, 1860-90. Miscellaneous records, including specifications, production figures, estimates, procurement orders, and registers of supplies issued, 1821-1908.

92.4.4 Records of the Supply Division and its predecessors

History: Supply and Transportation Division, consisting of Regular Supplies and Transportation Branches (see 92.4.2 and 92.5.2), established 1895. Abolished pursuant to elevation of Transportation Branch to divisional status by General Order 122, War Department, August 18, 1898, with Regular Supplies Branch continuing to function as an independent branch, 1898-1911. Supplies Division (SD) established, effective March 1, 1911, by an unnumbered OQMG memorandum, March 2, 1911, reorganizing OQMG. By same memorandum, SD incorporated Regular Supplies Branch (redesignated Requisitions Branch) and Clothing and Equipage Branch (see 94.4.3) and established Non-Personal Service Branch. Pursuant to consolidation of OQMG, OCGS, and OPG into OCQMC as result of the act of August 24, 1912, SD reorganized by Memorandum 1, OCQMC, October 8, 1912, into Miscellaneous Supplies (formerly Requisitions and Non-Personal Service Branches), Subsistence Supplies, and Clothing and Equipage, Branches.

As result of U.S. involvement in World War I, SD further expanded to include Conservation Branch, October 5, 1917 and Fuel and Forage Branch, December 14, 1917. SD progressively reduced by separation, and designation as divisions, of Conservation Branch, November 8, 1917 Subsistence (formerly Subsistence Supplies) Branch, January 2, 1918 and both Fuel and Forage, and Clothing and Equipage, Branches, January 18, 1918. By Office Order 202, OQMG, January 26, 1918, new Supply and Equipment Division (SED) established, consolidating remainder of Supplies Division with Committee on Supplies of the Council of National Defense QM Purchasing and Manufacturing Office and Clothing and Equipage Division. SED organized into Clothing and Equipage (CE), Hardware and Metals (HM), and Vehicles and Harnesses (VH), Branches, by Office Order 412, OQMG, May 18, 1918. SED abolished and CE, HM, and VH Branches redesignated divisions, pursuant to OQMG reorganization, effective June 14, 1918. CE, HM, and VH Divisions transferred from OQMG to WDGS, and assigned to PS&TD, October 21, 1918.

Pursuant to General Order 42, (1920), assigning supply functions of P&SS to OQMG, new Supply Service (SS) established in OQMG by Memorandum 6, OQMG, July 15, 1920. SS organized into branches according to the following commodities: clothing and equipage, subsistence, general supplies, vehicles and vessels, and salvaged and surplus property. Redesignated Supply Division (SD), effective June 15, 1930, by Office Order 22, OQMG, June 2, 1930. Pursuant to OQMG reorganization resulting from transfer of QMC to SOS, effective March 9, 1942, SD abolished by Office Order 84, OQMG, March 31, 1942, with functions of each commodity branch divided between newly established Procurement Service, and Storage and Distribution Service.

Textual Records: Records relating to clothing and equipage, including depot reports on contracts concluded, 1912-14 specifications, 1911-17 and miscellaneous production figures, estimates, procurement orders, and reports on supplies issued, 1917-23. Records relating to subsistence, including letters sent, 1912-13 abstracts of correspondence, 1914-15 and a summary of legislation (1776-1914) concerning the army ration, n.d.

92.4.5 Records of the Military Planning Division and its
predecessors

History: War Plans Division established in Control Service of OQMG by Office Memorandum 46, OQMG, August 30, 1920, with responsibility for coordinating within OQMG the solution of war plans problems presented by WDGS. By Office Memorandum 81, OQMG, June 8, 1921, transferred to newly established Executive Office redesignated War Planning Division (WPD) and made responsible for developing war plans, requirements, and research projects. WPD transferred to newly established Administrative Service redesignated War Planning and Training Division (WP&TD) and made responsible for developing mobilization and procurement plans, devising standards and specifications, and supervising training. WP&TD redesignated War Planning and Training Branch (WP&TB), effective June 15, 1930, by Office Order 22, OQMG, June 2, 1930. Procurement planning functions transferred to newly established Procurement Division and assigned to War Procurement Branch (WPB), by Office Order 32, OQMG, November 7, 1931 WPB transferred to WP&TB (redesignated War Plans and Training Branch) by Office Order 13, OQMG, May 2, 1936. WP&TB abolished by Office Order 49, OQMG, October 10, 1940, with training functions transferred to Personnel Division and remaining functions to newly established War Procurement and Requirements Branch (WP&RB), which also acquired contracts and claims functions from Supply Division. WP&RB abolished, with functions transferred to newly established Planning and Control Division (P&CD), by Office Order 25, OQMG, February 3, 1941. Pursuant to OQMG reorganization resulting from transfer of QMC to SOS, effective March 9, 1942, P&CD abolished by Office Order 84, OQMG, March 31, 1942, with planning functions transferred to newly established Military Planning Service (MPS), and control functions transferred to newly established Production Service (PS). MPS and PS consolidated to form Military Planning Division by Office Order 184, OQMG, July 31, 1942. Abolished by Special Regulation 10-330- 1, DA, May 7, 1953, with functions dispersed among several administrative and operational divisions.

Textual Records: Decimal correspondence, 1920-42, with separate subject and geographic area project files. Technical reports on captured enemy equipment, 1942-45.

Maps and Charts (130 items): Climatic regions of the world for army clothing distribution use, 1943-45 (75 items). Clothing zones of the world, 1944-51 (13 items). Landforms and mountainous areas of various regions of the world, 1948-54 (42 items). See also 92.16.

92.4.6 Records of other World War II and of postwar supply
organizations

Textual Records: Correspondence of the Procurement Division relating to procurement of dogs, 1947-63. Records of the Food Service Division, consisting of ration schedules, 1945-53 master menus, 1941-54 records of the Food Service School, Fort George G. Meade, MD, 1954 (in Philadelphia) reports on the hydroponic gardening program (&Nutriculture Gardening&), 1941-49 and the army food program, 1961-62. Portions of a decimal correspondence file (decimals 421.1-422.3) of the Clothing and Textile Material Division, 1953- 60. Records of the Equipment and Parts Division relating to relevant issuances, 1959-62. General correspondence of the Procurement Policy Branch of the Operations Control Office, 1961. Records of the Research and Engineering Division relating to product development, 1961-62.

92.5 Records of the Transportation Division
1834-1941

92.5.1 General records

Maps and Charts (510 items): U.S. railroad lines, 1865-1935 (10 items). Railroad lines located on or near army posts, mainly in United States, with some in France and Panama Canal Zone, 1917-22 (500 items). See also 92.16.

92.5.2 Records of the Transportation Branch/Division (1864-1918)

History: Third Division (Ocean and Lake Transportation) and Fourth Division (Rail and River Transportation) established by General Order 62, OQMG, December 23, 1864, implementing QMD reorganization act of July 4, 1864. Acquired responsibility for transporting troops previously assigned to individual staff officers. Consolidated, and designated Transportation Branch, pursuant to Special Order 20, OQMG, August 19, 1867, replacing OQMG divisional structure with branches. Assigned, with Regular Supplies Branch (see 92.4.2), to newly established Supply and Transportation Division, 1895. Redesignated Transportation Division (TD), effective July 18, 1898, by General Order 122, War Department, August 18, 1898, resulting in abolishment of Supply and Transportation Division and continuation of Regular Supplies Branch as an independent branch. TD acquired animal purchase and distribution responsibilities from Regular Supplies Branch, about 1908. Organized into Land Transportation, Water Transportation, Remount, and Miscellaneous Branches. Expanded, 1917, to include Motor Branch, with responsibility for purchase of motor-propelled vehicles. As result of U.S. involvement in World War I, Remount Branch separated from TD and given divisional status, October 3, 1917 Motor Branch separated from TD and given divisional status, January 26, 1918 (SEE 92.6.3) Water Transport (formerly Water Transportation) Branch transferred to WDGS and assigned to Embarkation Service of PS&TD, May 25, 1918 (SEE 92.5.3) and Land Transport (formerly Land Transportation) Branch transferred to WDGS and assigned to Inland Traffic Service of PS&TD, June 8, 1918 (see 92.5.3). TD abolished by Office Order 464, OQMG, June 15, 1918, with remaining functions assigned to other OQMG units.

Textual Records: Letters sent, 1863-67, 1871-89, with partial registers and indexes. Letters received, 1862-74, with partial registers and indexes. Registers and indexes to letters received, 1884-89. General correspondence, 1890, with register and record cards. Subject correspondence relating to vessels, 1834-1900. Daily, weekly, and monthly reports relating to vessel transportation, 1862-67. Records of the Office of Indebted Railroads concerning the purchase, by private firms, of U.S. Government railroads constructed during the Civil War, 1865-82. Miscellaneous records concerning vessels and railroads, 1862- 1912.

92.5.3 Records of the Transportation Service, War Department, and
its predecessors (1917-20)

History: Embarkation Service (ES) established in War Department by General Order 102, War Department, August 4, 1917, with responsibility for transporting American Expeditionary Forces (AEF) troops and supplies to Europe. Assigned to newly established Storage and Traffic Service (S&TS), War Department, by General Order 167, War Department, December 28, 1917. Division of Inland Transportation (DIT), responsible for supervising transportation of AEF troops and supplies from U.S. interior to embarkation points, established in S&TS, by a letter of Maj. Gen. George W. Goethals, S&TS Director, appointing Harry M. Adams, Vice President in Charge of Traffic of the Missouri Pacific Railroad, as Director of Inland Transportation, January 10, 1918. S&TS redesignated Storage and Traffic Division (S&TD) and made a component of WDGS, by General Order 14, War Department, February 9, 1918 consolidated with Purchase and Supply Division, WDGS, by General Order 36, War Department, April 16, 1918, to form PS&TD. DIT redesignated Inland Traffic Service (ITS), PS&TD, April 22, 1918. ES acquired Water Transport Branch of TD, OQMG, May 25, 1918 (see 92.5.2). ITS acquired Land Transport Branch of TD, OQMG, June 8, 1918 (see 92.5.2).

ES and ITS consolidated to form Transportation Service (TS) in PS&TD by Supply Circular 21, PS&TD, March 11, 1919. TS removed from PS&TD and made a separate War Department unit by General Order 54, War Department, April 21, 1919. Transferred to OQMG by General Order 42 (1920).

Textual Records: Correspondence arranged by vessel name and by vessel type, 1914-40 (bulk 1917-20 834 ft.). Correspondence of the Embarkation Service relating to damaged vessels (&Maritime Affairs Records&), 1917-20 (in New York). Lists of troop ship departures, 1917-20, and passengers, 1917-26. Logs of mine planters and other vessels, 1909-24. ITS subject-numeric correspondence, 1918-21, with indexes. Records of the Harbor Boat Service, consisting of logs of harbor boats stationed at Fort Worden, WA, 1917-41 (in Seattle).

Architectural and Engineering Plans (458 items): Plans and diagrams of Hog Island &B& ships, 1917-22 (441 items). Real property plans of the Philadelphia Expeditionary Depot, 1917-22 (17 items). See also 92.16.

Related Records: Record copies of publications of the Transportation Service in RG 287, Publications of the U.S. Government. Records of the Purchase, Storage and Traffic Division, 1918-20, in RG 165, Records of the War Department General and Special Staffs.

92.5.4 Records of the Transportation Service/Division (1920-42)

History: Transportation Service (TS) of War Department assigned to OQMG by General Order 42 (1920). Expanded by addition of Motor Transport Division (MTD, formerly Motor Transport Corps), 1920. In addition to MTD, TS organized into Animal, Motor, Rail, and Water Transport Divisions. Redesignated Transportation Division (TD), effective June 15, 1930, by Office Order 22, OQMG, June 2, 1930. Organized into Motor Transport, Rail Transport, and Water Transport Branches (animal procurement and distribution functions having been transferred to Remount Branch of Supply Division). Motor Transport Branch separated from TD and designated a division by Office Order 49, OQMG, July 26, 1940. Remaining TD units consolidated with G-4 Transportation Branch of WDGS, effective March 9, 1942, to form Transportation Division, SOS, by Circular 59, War Department, March 2, 1942. (For additional administrative history, see Records of the Office of the Chief of Transportation, RG 336.)

Textual Records: Vessel passenger lists, 1922-40.

Related Records: Record copies of publications of the Transportation Service in RG 287, Publications of the U.S. Government.

92.6 Records of Other Transportation Organizations
1860-1920

92.6.1 Records of the Office of the Director and General Manager,
Military Railroads United States (MRUS)

History: Established pursuant to the appointment, by Secretary of War, February 11, 1862, of Col. Daniel C. McCallum, U.S. Volunteers, as Military Director and Superintendent of Railroads in the United States, implementing an act of January 31, 1862 (12 Stat. 334), authorizing President to take possession of all railroad and telegraph lines in the interest of public safety. McCallum's title subsequently changed to Director and General Manager, MRUS. MRUS directly responsible to Secretary of War, with headquarters located in OQMG. Abolished July 31, 1866, with residual functions transferred to OQMG, pursuant to an Executive order of August 8, 1865, returning railroads to their original owners.

Textual Records: Headquarters records, consisting of letters and telegrams sent, 1861-66, and received, 1860-66 issuances, 1861- 64 annual and other reports, 1863-67 and miscellaneous records, 1861-67. Correspondence, reports, and other records of the following field offices: U.S. Military Railroads of Virginia (Alexandria, VA), 1862-66 U.S. Military Railroads, Division of the Mississippi (Nashville, TN), 1863-66 and U.S. Military Railroads, Division of the Missouri (St. Louis, MO), 1864.

92.6.2 Records of the Army Transport Service (ATS)

History: Established as a QMD field activity under general supervision of Transportation Division of OQMG, by regulations approved by the Secretary of War, November 16, 1898. Responsible for transporting army troops and supplies overseas. Organized under coequal General Superintendents, located respectively in New York, NY, and San Francisco, CA. Abolished pursuant to establishment of ES, by General Order 102, War Department, August 4, 1917, with Atlantic Ocean transport functions transferred to ES and Pacific Ocean transport functions dispersed among other QMC units.

Textual Records: Ships' logs, 1899-1916. Passenger lists, 1898- 1914. Cargo manifests, 1899-1909. Records of the Office of the General Superintendent, New York, NY, and subordinate units, 1898-1909. Records of the Office of the Quartermaster, ATS, Manila, Philippine Islands, 1901-10. Miscellaneous records, 1898- 1917.

Photographic Prints (810 images): Vessels used by ATS, 1898-1912 (AT). See also 92.17.

92.6.3 Records of the Office of the Chief, Motor Transport Corps
(OCMTC), War Department

History: Motor Branch established in TD of OQMG, 1917, with responsibility for purchase of motor-propelled vehicles. Redesignated Motors Division, January 26, 1918 Motor Transport Division, April 16, 1918 and Motor Transport Service by General Order 38, War Department, April 18, 1918. Redesignated Motor Transport Corps (MTC) and made a separate War Department unit, headed by a Chief, by General Order 75, War Department, August 15, 1918. Assigned to QMC by General Order 42 (1920). OCMTC abolished, with functions transferred to newly established Motor Transport Division of TS in OQMG, 1920. See 92.5.4.

Textual Records: Subject correspondence, 1914-20. Correspondence relating to vehicular production and transportation, 1915-18. Issuances, 1917-20.

Related Records: Records of the Tank Automotive Center and its successor, the Office of the Chief of Ordnance--Detroit, 1939-45, in RG 156, Records of the Office of the Chief of Ordnance.

92.7 Records of the Construction Division
1819-1941

History: Sixth Division (Barracks and Quarters) established by General Order 62, OQMG, December 23, 1864, implementing QMD reorganization act of July 4, 1864. Acquired responsibilities, previously assigned to individual staff officers, for constructing cantonment buildings, and locating and marking U.S. Army combatants' graves. Assumed functions of securing federal title to lands intended as national cemeteries, and maintaining the cemeteries, pursuant to an act of February 22, 1867 (14 Stat. 399), charging Secretary of War with those responsibilities. Pursuant to Special Order 20, OQMG, August 19, 1867, replacing OQMG divisional structure with branches, Sixth Division abolished, with construction functions transferred to newly established Barracks and Quarters Branch and cemeterial functions transferred to newly established Cemeterial Branch (see 92.8). Barracks and Quarters Branch assigned, with Reservation Branch, to newly established Construction and Repair Division (C&RD), 1895. C&RD reorganized, effective March 1, 1911, to include Construction, Reservation, Mechanical, and Miscellaneous Branches, by an unnumbered OQMG memorandum, March 2, 1911. Expanded to include Drafting Branch, 1912. Pursuant to U.S. involvement in World War I, responsibility for construction of new camps transferred from C&RD to newly established Cantonment Division, by letter from the Adjutant General of the Army to QMG, May 19, 1917. C&RD abolished, with remaining functions transferred to Cantonment Division, October 10, 1917. Cantonment Division transferred to WDGS and assigned to Operations Division, by General Order 14, War Department, February 9, 1918. Redesignated Construction Division (CD) and made a separate War Department unit, March 13, 1918. Assigned to OQMG by General Order 42 (1920), and redesignated Construction Service. Redesignated Construction Division, effective June 15, 1930, by Office Order 22, OQMG, June 2, 1930. Organized into Real Estate Branch and New Construction, Repairs, and Utilities Branch. Abolished, with functions transferred to Office of the Chief of Engineers, December 16, 1941, implementing an act of December 1, 1941 (55 Stat. 287).

92.7.1 General records

Textual Records: Letters sent, 1865-70, 1884-89, with partial index. List of letters received, 1865-67. Letters received, 1873- 88, with partial indexes. Record cards and indexes to correspondence, 1890. Numbered letters, 1941. Annual reports, 1903-15, 1918-19. Correspondence and reports of construction quartermasters, Galveston, TX, 1900-2 (in Fort Worth) Fort Leavenworth, KS, 1910 (in Kansas City) Newport, RI, 1902-3 (in Boston) Portland, ME, 1901-6 (in Boston) Mexican Border Project, 1918-20 (in Fort Worth) and Skiff Creek Dam, Lee Hall, VA, 1918-19 (in Philadelphia). Project completion reports, 1917- 38, with accompanying plans and photographs. Specifications, descriptions, construction registers, and other records relating to buildings, property, and utilities at Army Supply Base, Brooklyn, NY, 1918 (in New York) Fort Sheridan, IL, 1929-39 (in Chicago) Camp Custer, Battle Creek, MI, 1916-17 (in Chicago) Camp Bowie, TX, 1917 (in Fort Worth) Camp Fremont, Palo Alto, CA, 1918 (in San Francisco) Edgewood Arsenal, MD, 1918 (in Philadelphia) and Delaware Ordnance Depot, Pedericktown, NJ, 1919 (in New York). Engineer field books, port terminal construction at Newark, NJ, 1917-18 (in New York). Abstracts of disbursements by quartermasters at Army Reserve Depots, New Cumberland, PA, 1917-20 (in Philadelphia) East Columbus, OH, 1917-20 (in Chicago) Fort Riley, KS, 1917-20 (in Kansas City) and Camp Shelby, MS, 1917-20 (in Atlanta). Miscellaneous records, 1819-1912. Historical file, 1919. Real Estate Branch record of titles to U.S. military reservations, Hawaiian Department, 1920 (in San Francisco).

Maps and Charts (1 item): Construction Division activities throughout United States, 1917-20. See also 92.16.

Architectural and Engineering Plans (14,573 items): Buildings constructed by QMC on army posts and hospital and cemeterial grounds, in depots, and at ports of embarkation, in the United States, Cuba, Puerto Rico, China, and Philippine Islands, 1890- 1926 (14,000 items). Standard plans of cantonments, 1916-39 (258 items). Buildings and utilities, Army Supply Base, Brooklyn, NY, 1919 (143 items, in New York). &Utility Atlas,& Army Supply Base, Boston, MA, 1919 (162 items, in Boston). Reconstruction of Ordnance Machine Shop, Fort Adams, RI, 1921 (10 items, in Boston). See also 92.16.

Photographic Prints (6,300 images): Construction of forts, hospitals, depots, coastal defenses, and other army facilities, 1909-36 (CD). See also 92.17.

Related Records: Record copies of publications of the Construction Division in RG 287, Publications of the U.S. Government. Records of the Construction Division, 1890-1945, in RG 77, Records of the Office of the Chief of Engineers.

92.7.2 Records of the Reservation Branch

History: Established during FY 1889, with responsibility for preserving title papers of all military reservations under War Department purview, and for conducting correspondence relating to such reservations. Assigned, with Barracks and Quarters Branch, to newly established C&RD, 1895. Pursuant to OQMG reorganization, effective March 1, 1911, by unnumbered OQMG memorandum, March 2, 1911, land purchase and title oversight functions assigned to Construction Branch of C&RD, with Reservation Branch assigned to construction and/or maintenance of grounds, roads, and railways, and fire protection and sewage systems on military reservations.

Textual Records: Letters sent, 1888-89. Registers and indexes of letters received, 1888-89. Record cards, registers, and indexes to correspondence, 1890. Case files, 1888-89, with index. Narrative histories of various posts, camps, and stations, 1890. Records relating to licenses issued to, and withdrawn from, private firms doing work on military reservations, 1893-1903. Descriptions of land purchased in continental United States and in Philippine Islands, 1908-11.

92.7.3 Records of the Real Estate Branch

History: Real Estate Unit, in Purchase Section of Purchase and Supply Branch, PS&TD, WDGS, established by Supply Circular 32, PS&TD, June 22, 1918. Responsible for handling all War Department real estate matters, including procurement. Redesignated Real Estate Section and transferred to Facilities Department, PS&TD, August 27, 1918. Redesignated Real Estate Service, and made a separate War Department unit, by General Order 43, War Department, April 1, 1919. Assigned to OQMG by General Order 42, War Department (1920). Redesignated Real Estate Division and assigned to Construction Service of OQMG, 1920. Redesignated Real Estate Branch, with Construction Service redesignated Construction Division, effective June 15, 1930, by Office Order 22, OQMG, June 2, 1930.

Textual Records: Decimal correspondence, 1917-22.

Related Records: Records of the Real Estate Branch, 1917-44, in RG 77, Records of the Office of the Chief of Engineers.

92.8 Records of the Memorial Division
1828-1970

History: Sixth Division (Barracks and Quarters) established by General Order 62, OQMG, December 23, 1864, implementing QMD reorganization act of July 4, 1864. Acquired responsibilities, previously assigned to individual staff officers, for constructing cantonment buildings, and locating and marking U.S. Army combatants' graves. Assumed functions of securing federal title to lands intended as national cemeteries, and maintaining the cemeteries, pursuant to an act of February 22, 1867 (14 Stat. 399), charging Secretary of War with those responsibilities. Pursuant to Special Order 20, OQMG, August 19, 1867, replacing OQMG divisional structure with branches, Sixth Division abolished, with construction functions transferred to newly established Barracks and Quarters Branch (see 92.7) and cemeterial functions transferred to newly established Cemeterial Branch (CB). CB redesignated National Cemeteries Branch (NCB) and assigned to newly established Mail and Records Division, 1895. Pursuant to OQMG reorganization, effective March 1, 1911, by unnumbered OQMG memorandum, March 2, 1911, NCB redesignated CB and assigned to newly established Administrative Division.

Pursuant to U.S. involvement in World War I, CB transferred, with all other units of Administration Division (formerly Administrative Division), to WDGS, and assigned to General Administrative Division of ODPS, PS&TD, October 28, 1918. ODPS redesignated P&SS and made a separate War Department unit, April 11, 1919. CB consolidated with Headquarters, Graves Registration Service (see 92.9.1) to form Cemeterial Division by Purchase and Storage Notice 43, P&SS, February 26, 1920.

Pursuant to General Order 42, War Department (1920), Cemeterial Division transferred to OQMG, 1920. Redesignated Graves Registration Service, effective March 15, 1922, by Office Order 25, OQMG, March 10, 1922. Redesignated Cemeterial Division and assigned to Administrative Service, about 1924. Redesignated Memorial Branch, with Administrative Service redesignated Administrative Division, effective June 15, 1930, by Office Order 22, OQMG, June 2, 1930. Redesignated Memorial Division (MD) by Office Order 144, OQMG, December 27, 1940.

Pursuant to OQMG reorganization following assignment of QMC to SOS, March 1942, MD assigned to newly established Service Installations Division by Office Order 84, OQMG, March 31, 1942. Redesignated Memorial Branch by Office Order 184, OQMG, July 31, 1942. Separated from Service Installations Division and redesignated Memorial Division by Office Order 25-78, OQMG, May 6, 1944.

92.8.1 General records

Textual Records: Letters sent, 1866-89, with partial indexes. Letters received, 1862-82, with partial indexes. General correspondence, 1864-90, with index, register, and record cards. Record cards to correspondence, in the OQMG central correspondence file, relating to the removal of remains, 1890- 1914. Decimal correspondence, consisting of the cemeterial affairs portion of the OQMG central correspondence file (decimals 247-314), 1914-22. Burial case files, consisting of decimal 293 of the OQMG central decimal correspondence file, 1915-39. War Department and OQMG issuances relating to cemeteries, 1866-1905. Various lists of deceased army personnel, most with grave locations indicated, 1828-99, with partial indexes. &Rolls of Honor& listing Union war dead, 1865-71. Records of the Post Quartermaster, Chattanooga, TN, relating to both post and national cemeteries, 1864-74 (in Atlanta).

92.8.2 Records relating to the administration of national
cemeteries

Textual Records: Letters and reports received, arranged by name of cemetery, 1865-1914. Subject correspondence, 1907-19. Decimal correspondence, 1920-60. Correspondence concerning construction and maintenance of cemetery approach roads, 1877-90. Burial registers, 1862-1960. Burial registration forms, 1928-62. Inspection reports, 1865-1910. Monthly interment reports from various national cemeteries, 1914, 1928-29. Rosters of, and issuances concerning, national cemetery superintendents, 1867- 1926. Correspondence and other records concerning the selection of two unidentified deceased U.S. combatants of World War II and the Korean War, respectively, for burial at the Tomb of the Unknown Soldier in Arlington National Cemetery (May 30, 1958), 1957-58.

Photographic Prints (700 images): National cemeteries, 1881-1907 (CA, 621 images). U.S. cemeteries in Belgium, France, and United Kingdom for World War I combat dead, 1919-22 (CAP, 79 images). See also 92.17.

92.8.3 Records of specific national cemeteries

Textual Records: Records of Annapolis National Cemetery, MD, 1874-1919 Finn's Point National Cemetery, NJ, 1877-1921 Florence National Cemetery, SC, 1871-1916 Fort Gibson National Cemetery, OK, 1885-1931 (in Forth Worth) Fort McPherson National Cemetery, NE, 1874-1921 (in Kansas City) and 1912-19 (in Washington Area) Jefferson City National Cemetery, MO, 1876-1933 New Albany National Cemetery, IN, 1868-1924 New Mexico National Cemetery, Santa Fe, NM, 1895-1914 (in Denver) Port Hudson National Cemetery, LA, 1869-1921 San Antonio National Cemetery, San Antonio, TX, 1874-1920 (in Fort Worth) and Santa Fe National Cemetery, NM, 1895-1913.

92.8.4 Records relating to the administration of post cemeteries

Textual Records: Letters and reports received, arranged by name of cemetery, 1865-1914. Correspondence and other records of cemeteries located at abandoned army posts, ca. 1874-1947. Reports, burial lists, and other records of post cemeteries in the Philippine Islands, Puerto Rico, and Cuba, 1894-1917.

92.8.5 Records relating to the furnishing of headstones

History: QMC assumed responsibility for headstone procurement and issuance pursuant to an act of February 22, 1867 (14 Stat. 399), charging Secretary of War with marking every grave in national cemeteries with a headstone. Responsibility for furnishing headstones extended to include graves of U.S. Army combatants buried in private cemeteries, by an act of February 3, 1879 (20 Stat. 281). Further extended to include graves of Confederate Army combatants buried in national and private cemeteries, by an act of February 26, 1929 (45 Stat. 1307). Further extended to include graves of all members of the U.S. armed forces deceased while in service or honorably discharged from service, by an act of July 1, 1948 (62 Stat. 1215).

Textual Records: Lists of headstones and of headstone inscriptions, 1861-1916. Card record of headstone contracts, 1861-1903. Headstone applications, 1909-70.

92.9 Records of Graves Registration Organizations
1917-54

92.9.1 Records of the Graves Registration Service (GRS)

History: Established as a QMC field activity by General Order 104, War Department, August 7, 1917. Responsible for maintaining a burial registration system acquiring land in France for cemeteries and maintaining such cemeteries. Headquarters GRS established in Zone of the Lines of Communication (ZLC), American Expeditionary Forces (AEF), by General Order 30, Hq. AEF, February 15, 1918, acquiring functions previously performed by Burial Department, established in Hq. AEF by General Order 27, Hq. AEF, August 29, 1917. ZLC redesignated successively Service of the Rear by General Order 31, Hq. AEF, February 16, 1918 and Services of Supply (SOS), March 31, 1918, by correction to General Order 31. Pursuant to deactivation of GRS by Commanding General, SOS, effective July 1, 1919, Headquarters GRS transferred to newly established Cemeterial Division of P&SS, February 26, 1920. Residual functions performed by Cemeterial Division and its successors (see 92.8).

Textual Records: Numbered burial reports, 1918-19. Various burial registers and cemetery lists showing grave location of U.S., other Allied, and Central Powers combatants, 1917-22. Registers of disinterments and reburials, 1919-31. Correspondence relating to Federal Government-sponsored visits to U.S. combatants' graves in Europe by mothers and widows (&Gold Star Mothers' and Widows' Pilgrimage to Europe&), 1930-33.

Maps and Charts (350 items): Graveplot charts of temporary battlefield cemeteries, 1917-21. See also 92.16.

92.9.2 Records of the American Graves Registration Service (AGRS)

History: Established, with QMG as Chief, by Circular 206, War Department, September 11, 1943, confirming an unnumbered restricted War Department circular, February 18, 1943, establishing a graves registration service in the QM's office in each theater of operations and defense command outside the continental United States. Field activities coordinated in OQMG by Memorial Branch (see 92.8). In anticipation of an act of May 16, 1946 (60 Stat. 182), authorizing AGRS to repatriate World War II dead, AGRS reorganized into area and zone commands outside continental United States by General Order 125, War Department, December 29, 1945. Field activities coordinated in OQMG by Memorial Division (formerly Memorial Branch see 92.8). Terminated December 31, 1951, at expiration of time limit given in an amendment of August 5, 1947 (61 Stat. 779), with residual functions transferred to Memorial Division.

Textual Records: Registers of presumed deceased U.S. military personnel (1941-45) with unknown grave locations, compiled 1951- 54. Records relating to plans for repatriating deceased U.S. military personnel from various theaters of war, 1945-48. Records compiled by the U.S. Air Force, consisting of reports on missing air crews, 1943-45, with index and lists of Allied air crashes prepared from German sources, 1939-45. General correspondence of the AGRS, American Zone, 1945-48.

Microfilm Publications: M1380.

Maps and Charts (1,800 items): Graveplot charts of temporary battlefield cemeteries (1941-45), compiled 1946-51. See also 92.16.

92.10 Records of War Department Commissions Concerned with
Military Cemeteries and Battlefield Parks
1893-1923

Related Records: QMC records relating to administration of the various military parks in RG 79, Records of the National Park Service.

92.10.1 General records

Textual Records: Subject correspondence of the Office of the Secretary of War relating to Chickamauga-Chattanooga, Vicksburg, and other National Military Parks, 1913-23.

92.10.2 Records of the Office of the Commissioner for Locating
and Marking Confederate Graves

History: Established for two years by an act of March 9, 1906 (34 Stat. 56), with responsibility for locating and marking the graves of Confederate combatants who had died in the North as prisoners of war and had been buried near their places of confinement. Continued for an additional two years by House Joint Resolution 139 (35 Stat. 567), February 26, 1908. Continued for an additional two years by House Joint Resolution 137 (36 Stat. 875), February 25, 1910, with responsibility expanded to include the marking of Confederate civilians' graves located in the North among those of Confederate combatants. By Senate Joint Resolution 125 (36 Stat. 1453), December 23, 1910, acquired additional responsibility of erecting monuments in the North containing names of Confederate combatants and civilians whose graves could not be located. Terminated upon submission of a final report dated October 23, 1912, with residual functions transferred to OQMG. Reactivated for two years by Senate Joint Resolution 90 (38 Stat. 768), March 14, 1914, with responsibility for marking the graves of all Confederate combatants and civilians buried in national and post cemeteries. Continued until March 13, 1918, by House Joint Resolution 171 (39 Stat. 52), April 17, 1916. Terminated March 13, 1918.

Textual Records: General correspondence, consisting of letters sent, 1906-12 subject correspondence, 1906-12, with abstracts of letters received correspondence arranged by geographical location, 1909-15, with abstracts of letters received and correspondence arranged by name of cemetery, 1907-12. Diary of works accomplished (January-August 1915), 1915. Burial and related lists, 1906-14. Manufacturers' proposals for grave markers, 1903-10. Rubbings of monuments containing Confederate combatants' names, n.d.

Microfilm Publications: M918.

Glass Negatives (6 images): Memorials in Maryland and Illinois dedicated to Confederate dead, 1910-11 (CMG). See also 92.17.

92.10.3 Records of the Antietam Board

History: Two-man board (&Antietam Board&), with responsibility for demarcating Antietam, MD, battlefield and purchasing land on which to erect historical markers, appointed by Secretary of War, August 1, 1891, pursuant to an act of August 30, 1890 (26 Stat. 401), appropriating funds for that purpose. Expanded to four members by letters of Secretary of War to the two new appointees, October 13 and 20, 1894, respectively. Terminated March 23, 1898, with QMG directed to administer the battlefield, by endorsement of Secretary of War of final report (March 18, 1898) of board president. Washington Depot, QMD, delegated to administer Antietam Battlefield Park by QMG endorsement of same report, March 30, 1898. Park administration transferred from QMC (formerly QMD) to Office of National Parks, Buildings, and Reservations, Department of the Interior, effective August 10, 1933, by EO 6166, June 10, 1933, as amended by EO 6228, July 28, 1933.

Textual Records: Subject correspondence, 1893-94. Subject-numeric correspondence, 1894-98, with record cards. Lists of markers and citations to be placed on the battlefield, n.d.

92.10.4 Records of the Gettysburg National Military Park
Commission

History: Established by Secretary of War, May 25, 1893, pursuant to an act of March 3, 1893 (27 Stat. 599), appropriating funds for restoration of Civil War battlefield at Gettysburg, PA. By an act of February 11, 1895 (28 Stat. 651), battlefield formally designated Gettysburg National Military Park, and commission made responsible for acquiring land on which to erect historical markers. Commission allowed to lapse pursuant to an act of August 24, 1912 (37 Stat. 442), providing that national military park commission vacancies not be filled thereafter, and that duties be transferred to Secretary of War. Terminated about 1924, with functions transferred to QMC (formerly QMD). Park administration transferred from QMC to Office of National Parks, Buildings, and Reservations, Department of the Interior, effective August 10, 1933, by EO 6166, June 10, 1933, as amended by EO 6228, July 28, 1933.

Textual Records: Letters sent by Office of the Secretary of War (OSW) to the commission, 1895-98. Register of letters received by OSW from the commission, 1895-97. Correspondence of OSW with the commission, 1898-1913.

92.10.5 Records of the Shiloh National Military Park Commission

History: Established by Secretary of War, April 1895, pursuant to an act of December 27, 1894 (28 Stat. 597), establishing Shiloh National Military Park, TN. Allowed to lapse pursuant to an act of August 24, 1912 (37 Stat. 442), providing that national military park commission vacancies not be filled thereafter, with duties transferred to Secretary of War. Terminated about 1924, with functions transferred to QMC. Park administration transferred from QMC to Office of National Parks, Buildings, and Reservations, Department of the Interior, effective August 10, 1933, by EO 6166, June 10, 1933, as amended by EO 6228, July 28, 1933.

Textual Records: Letters sent by OSW to the commission, 1895-99. Register of letters received by OSW from the commission, 1895-99. Correspondence of OSW with the commission, 1895-1911.

92.10.6 Records of the Vicksburg National Military Park
Commission

History: Established by Secretary of War, March 1, 1899, pursuant to an act of February 21, 1899 (30 Stat. 841), establishing Vicksburg National Military Park, MS. Allowed to lapse pursuant to an act of August 24, 1912 (37 Stat. 442), providing that national military park commission vacancies not be filled thereafter, with duties transferred to Secretary of War. Terminated about 1924, with park administration assumed by QMC. Administration transferred to Office of National Parks, Buildings, and Reservations, Department of the Interior, effective August 10, 1933, by EO 6166, June 10, 1933, as amended by EO 6228, July 28, 1933.

Textual Records: Correspondence of OSW with the Commission, 1899- 1913.

92.11 Records Relating to Personnel
1823-1926, 1942-50

92.11.1 General correspondence

Textual Records: Letters sent, 1865-66, 1871-73, 1884-89, with partial indexes. Registers of and indexes to letters received, 1863-68, 1871-89. Letters received, 1890, with record cards and index. Letters sent and received relating to the hiring of clerks and messengers, 1863-72. Subject-numeric correspondence, 1891- 1914, with record cards.

92.11.2 Other records

Textual Records: Annual, personal, and other narrative reports received from individual QM officers, 1833-1908. Reports of civilians employed by QMD at various posts, 1865. Lists of QMD and QMC officers, enlisted men, and civilian employees, some showing duty stations, 1823-1914. Correspondence and other records relating to decorations and awards, 1906-26, with partial index. Letters, reports, lists, and other records relating to QMD volunteer regiments and OQMG personnel in Washington, DC, 1864- 65. Records relating to position and wage classification surveys at field installations, 1942-50. Miscellaneous records, 1865- 1916.

92.12 Records Relating to Finance and Accounting
1820-1919, 1941-62

92.12.1 General records

Textual records: Letters sent, 1833-48, 1864-70, 1884-89, with partial indexes. Letters received, 1870-90, with registers and indexes. General correspondence, 1890, with register and record cards. Miscellaneous appropriation, allocation, and disbursement records, 1820-1919. Records relating to QMC transactions under the Lend-Lease Program, 1941-49. Annual and other reports relating to Army Industrial Fund activities at selected QM depots, 1950-55. Budget preparation and execution records, 1957- 62.

92.12.2 Records relating to claims

Textual Records: Letters sent and received, 1864-90, with partial indexes. Claims registers, 1839-1914, with partial indexes. Case files, 1861-1914. Annual reports of the Claims Branch, 1878-86. Weekly and monthly reports of QM claims agents, 1883-85. Correspondence, minutes, and other records of claim boards, including a board to investigate claims against the Florida militia, 1841 the California Claims Board, 1847-55 and various Civil War and Spanish-American War claims boards, 1861-67, 1900- 1.

92.13 Records of the Office of the Historian
1917-20, 1943-62

Textual Records: Historical records relating to QM activities during World War I and the immediate postwar period, 1917-20. Historical summaries of various QM units and field installations, 1950-52. Histories of various QM field installations, 1943-52. Miscellaneous topical histories (1903-62), compiled 1943-62. Copies of historical documents (1774-1962), compiled ca. 1945-62.

Related Records: Record copies of publications of the Historical Division in RG 287, Publications of the U.S. Government

92.14 Records of Boards and Committees
1864-1959

Textual Records: Proceedings of quartermaster examination boards in various army departments, 1864-65. Decimal correspondence of the Federal Commission on the Commemoration of the 75th Anniversary of the Battle of Gettysburg (June-July 1938), 1936- 38. Minutes and subcommittee reports of the QMC Technical Committee, 1935-41. Records of the Working Group of the Army Supply Methods Committee, including records of the Committee's predecessor, the Ad Hoc Committee of the Chiefs of Technical Services, 1946-50. Records of the OQMG member of the Army Mathematics Advisory Panel, 1954-59. Records of temporary boards assigned to such tasks as drafting regulations, reviewing organizational structure, recommending new equipment, and investigating irregularities, 1864-1915, 1918-26.

92.15 Records of Field Organizations
1781-1966

92.15.1 Records of Headquarters, Quartermaster Depot, New York,
NY, and subordinate organizations

Textual Records (in New York): Letters sent, 1864-1907, with partial indexes. Letters received, 1864-75, 1880-1905, with partial registers and indexes. Decimal correspondence, 1918-29. Correspondence with subordinate installations, 1922-24. Miscellaneous records, 1861-75, 1918-30. Decimal correspondence of Headquarters, QM Subdepot, Red Bank, NJ, 1918-19. Records of the New York Purchasing Agency, 1945-50.

92.15.2 Records of Headquarters, QM Depot, Philadelphia, PA, and
subordinate organizations

Textual Records (in Philadelphia): Letters sent, 1857-1909, with partial indexes. Letters received, 1858-1914, with partial registers and indexes. General correspondence, 1909-20, with partial record cards and indexes. General records, 1927-50. Letters sent and received by the Office of the Assistant Quartermaster, 1869-1911, with partial registers and indexes. Correspondence of the Headquarters Detachment, 1917-19. General and special orders, circulars, and notices, 1888-1909, 1920-21, 1924. Miscellaneous records, 1857-1921. Records of the Schuylkill Arsenal, including letters sent, 1858-1906, with partial registers letters received, 1858-1905, with partial registers and indexes and miscellaneous records, 1860-1922. General correspondence of the Pittsburgh Storage and Supply Depot, Pittsburgh, PA, 1910-14, with record cards and indexes. Historical files, 1949-55.

92.15.3 Records of other field organizations at Philadelphia, PA

Textual Records: Records of the Military Storekeeper relating to the receipt and allocation of supplies, 1781, 1795-1859. Records of the Quartermaster Officer relating to the transportation of troops and supplies, 1802-56. Accounting records of the Clothing Establishment, 1804-58 and of the Office of Army Clothing and Equipage, 1842-59.

92.15.4 Records of QM Facilities, Fort Lee, VA

Textual Records: Records of the Post Headquarters, 1941-52 the Quartermaster Replacement Training Center, 1941-53 the Quartermaster School, 1925-54 the Quartermaster Board, 1945- 50 the Quartermaster Technical Training Service, 1948-50 the Reserve Officer Training Corps (ROTC) summer camp, 1949-50 the Tactical Development Board, 1949-53 and the Quartermaster Training Center/Command, 1950-64.

92.15.5 Headquarters records of other field organizations

Textual Records: Correspondence, issuances, reports, and other records of the following organizations:

Animal Embarkation Depot, Charleston, SC, 1918-19 (in Atlanta)

Army Reserve Depots, Columbus, OH, 1918-19 (in Chicago) New Cumberland, PA, 1918-19 (in Philadelphia) and Schenectady, NY, 1918-19 (in New York)

General Depots, Atlanta, GA, 1950-51 (in Atlanta) Auburn, WA, 1945-50 (in Seattle) Belle Meade, NJ, 1942-50 (in New York) Columbus, OH, 1917-50 (in Chicago) Lathrop, CA (Sharpe), 1945-51 (in San Francisco) Memphis, TN, 1942-50 (in Atlanta) New Cumberland, PA, 1939-67 (in Philadelphia) Ogden, UT, 1943-48 (in Denver) Pasco, WA, 1942-50 (in Seattle) San Antonio, TX, 1939- 55 (in Fort Worth) Schenectady, NY, 1943-50 (in New York) and Seattle, WA, 1943-50 (in Seattle)

General Equipment Test Activity, Fort Lee, VA, 1957-65 (in Philadelphia)

Market Center System, Chicago, IL, 1941-50 (in Chicago)

Motor Transport Corps Overhaul Park, Philadelphia, PA, 1918-20 (in Philadelphia)

Motor Transport Depots, Baltimore, MD (Fort Holabird), 1919-33 (in Philadelphia) Chicago, IL, 1919-20 (in Chicago) and San Antonio, TX (Normoyle), 1921-38 (in Fort Worth)

Ports of Embarkation, Hoboken, NJ, 1917-21 (in New York) and Newport News, VA, 1917-21 (in Philadelphia)

Procurement Service District, Atlanta, GA, 1951 (in Atlanta)

Purchasing Agency, New York, NY 1945-50 (in New York)

QM Clothing Depot, St. Louis, MO, 1877-84 (in Kansas City)

QM Depots, Atlanta, GA, 1918-22, 1940-51 (in Atlanta) Boston, MA, 1918-19 (in Boston) Charlotte, NC, 1941-55 (in Atlanta) Chicago, IL, 1940-53 (in Chicago) Elmira, NY, 1942-47 (in New York) Fort Holabird, MD, 1941-45 (in Philadelphia) Fort Worth, TX, 1940-53 (in Fort Worth) Front Royal, VA, 1945-48 (in Philadelphia) Galveston, TX, 1913-15 (in Fort Worth) Jeffersonville, IN, 1866-1906, 1918-39, 1941-51 (in Chicago) Jersey City, NJ, 1942-46 (in New York) Kansas City, MO, 1941-48 (in Kansas City) Mira Loma, CA, 1942-54 (in Los Angeles) Montgomery, AL, 1945-47 (in Atlanta) Richmond, VA, 1941-58 (in Philadelphia) San Antonio, TX, 1919 (in Fort Worth) San Francisco, CA, 1874-75 (in San Francisco) Santa Monica, CA, 1949-51 (in Los Angeles) Savannah, GA, 1898-99, 1941-47 (in Atlanta) Seattle, WA, 1907-39 (in Seattle) Shreveport, LA, 1944-47 (in Fort Worth) Tampa, FL, 1898-99 (in Atlanta) and Washington, DC, 1861-1917, 1940-51 (in Washington Area)

QM Food and Container Institute, Chicago, IL, 1947-51 (in Washington Area)

QM Subdepot, Los Angeles, CA, 1918-21 (in Los Angeles)

Remount Areas, Colorado Springs, CO (West Central), ca. 1928-38 (in Denver) Lexington, KY (Central), 1928-39, 1945 (in Atlanta) and San Angelo, TX (Southwest), ca. 1928-38 (in Fort Worth)

Remount Depots, Fort Reno, OK, 1920-39 (in Forth Worth) and Fort Robinson, NE, 1919-45 (in Kansas City)

Remount Station, Fort Reno, OK, 1951-54 (in Fort Worth)

92.16 Cartographic Records (General)
1820-1985

Maps (75 items): National cemeteries and cemeterial districts for Civil War Union soldiers in AL, GA, KY, MS, SC, and TN, 1867.

Maps and Charts (9 items): Areas of the world containing actual and probable oil deposits, ca. 1950 (1 item). Oversize organization charts of the Office of the Quartermaster General, 1918-19 (8 items).

Architectural and Engineering Plans (1,677 items): Military posts in United States and Philippine Islands, 1904-5 (400 items). Barracks, stables, forts, hospitals, and other buildings, 1820- 1905 (575 items). Buildings at Fort Leavenworth, KS, 1899-1985 (702 items, in Kansas City).

See Maps and Charts under 92.4.5, 92.5.1, 92.7.1, 92.9.1, and 92.9.2. See Architectural and Engineering Plans under 92.5.3 and 92.7.1.

92.17 Still Pictures (General)
1860-1938

Photographic Prints: Individual quartermasters, including three drawings of Revolutionary War Quartermasters General Morgan Lewis, Stephen Moylan, and Timothy Pickering (1776-1906), 1860-1906 (P, 600 images). Army installations, uniforms, flags, insignia, equipment, and subsistence services, 1861-1920 (PS, UF, FL, WC, MA, S, M 1,830 images). Army installations in United States, Cuba, and Philippine Islands, 1890-99 (F, 1,400 images). Relief efforts following San Francisco, CA, earthquake, 1906 (ER, 34 images). Mississippi River floods in Tennessee and Kentucky, in album, 1912 (MRF, 34 images). Army vehicles damaged in a Coblenz, Germany, flood, in album, 1919-20 (CG, 168 images). Activities commemorating 75th anniversary of Battle of Gettysburg (1863), Gettysburg, PA, 1938 (GA, 264 images). QM personnel at various installations and observations of 148th and 149th anniversaries of QMC, 1918-24 (PN, 57 images). Army exhibits at World's Columbian Exposition, Chicago IL, 1893 Louisiana Purchase Exposition, St. Louis, Mo, 1904 and Alabama State Fair, 1925 (EX, 25 images).

Glass Negatives (60 images): Forts Egbert and St. Michaels, AK, 1899-1900 (FA).

Lithographs: Army uniforms (1779-1907), 1885-1907 (HO, 40 images). Views of Point Lookout, MD Camp Hill at Harpers Ferry, WV Camp Dennison, OH and Johnson's Island, OH, 1865 (AI, 4 images). Moseley bridges, manufactured by American Iron Bridge and Manufacturing Company, Chester, PA, 1865 (AI, 1 image).

See Photographic Prints under 92.3.1, 92.6.2, 92.7.1, and 92.8.2. See Glass Negatives under 92.10.2. See Posters under 92.3.1.

Bibliographic note: Web version based on Guide to Federal Records in the National Archives of the United States. Compiled by Robert B. Matchette et al. Washington, DC: National Archives and Records Administration, 1995.
3 volumes, 2428 pages.

This Web version is updated from time to time to include records processed since 1995.



The following sources were used throughout this section and are listed here so that they need not be listed multiple times. Sources used specifically for a particular unit are listed with that unit's information:

United States Army Quartermaster Museum Web Site:

Mr. Mark Boland


Quartermaster Groups

21st Quartermaster Group * - Myitkyina

45th Quartermaster Group * - Ledo

On 1 December 1943, the 45th QM Regiment was broken up and the units were redesignated. The 45th Quartermaster Truck Regiment became the 45th Quartermaster Group with the 1st Battalion redesignated the Headquarters and Headquarters Detachment, 45th Quartermaster Battalion, Mobile and the 2nd Battalion became 68th Quartermaster Battalion, Mobile. The Companies A through M were also redesignated to numbered companies and followed separate lineages.

468th Quartermaster Group * - Ledo

472nd Quartermaster Group - Chabua

478th Quartermaster Group - China

517th Quartermaster Group

* Negro Units


21st QM Regiment *

  • Constituted 1 May 1936 in the Regular Army as Headquarters and Headquarters Detachment, 21st Quartermaster Regiment with 1st, 2nd, and 3d Battalions assigned
  • Redesignated 1 April 1942 as Headquarters and Headquarters Detachment, 21st Quartermaster Truck Regiment
  • Activated 16 April 1942 at Fort Benning, Georgia
  • On 1 December 1943, the 21st Regiment was reorganized and its three battalions were redesignated as Headquarters and Headquarters Detachment (HHD), 36th Quartermaster Battalion HHD, 39th Quartermaster Battalion and HHD, 108th Quartermaster Battalion. The lettered companies, E through H, were redesignated 3305th through 3308th Quartermaster Truck Companies respectively and assigned to the 39th Quartermaster Battalion.
  • Inactivated 7 November 1945 at Camp Kilmer, New Jersey
  • Converted and redesignated 1 August 1946 as Headquarters and Headquarters Detachment, 39th Transportation Corps Truck Battalion
  • Redesignated 11 June 1954 as Headquarters and Headquarters Company, 39th Transportation Battalion
  • Activated 3 August 1954 at Camp Gordon, Georgia
  • Reorganized and redesignated 25 June 1959 as Headquarters and Headquarters Detachment, 39th Transportation Battalion
  • Inactivated 10 March 1972 at Fort Lewis, Washington
  • Activated 16 February 1986 in Germany

Campaign Participation Credit:

  • World War II: India-Burma Central Burma
  • Vietnam: Counteroffensive, Phase II Counteroffensive, Phase III Tet Counteroffensive Counteroffensive, Phase IV Counteroffensive, Phase V Counteroffensive, Phase VI Tet 69/Counteroffensive Summer-Fall 1969 Winter-Spring 1970 Sanctuary Counteroffensive Counteroffensive, Phase VII Consolidation I Consolidation II

Decorations:

  • Meritorious Unit Commendation (Army) for VIETNAM 1968-1969
  • Army Superior Unit Award for 1987
  • Republic of Vietnam Cross of Gallantry with Palm for VIETNAM 1971

Distinctive Unit Insignia:

Symbolism: Brick red and golden yellow are colors used for Transportation. The organization's World War II campaign awards for service in the India-Burma and Central Burma areas are commemorated by the snow-capped mountain for the hauling of supplies over many treacherous mountain roads near the Tibet border the palm tree and anchor indicate the many inland waterways traversed in Burmese transportation. In addition, the palm tree and anchor together with the black ring, symbolic of the wheels of motor transportation, denote the battalion's port activities in the Republic of Vietnam. The color green also alludes to Vietnam service.

Coat of Arms:

Crest: On a wreath of the colors, Or and Gules (Brick Red), a mountain Azure capped Argent surmounted by an anchor bendwise sinister Or, debruised by a palm tree bendwise Proper.

Motto: WE'LL CARRY YOU.

Shield: Brick red and golden yellow are the colors of the Transportation Corps. The anchor stands for inland waterways of Burma and the port duty of the unit's Vietnam tour. The elephant alludes to World War II service when elephants were used extensively to aid loading trucks and aircraft in the Burma-India Theater. The truck wheels are symbolic of transportation.

Crest: Buff and blue are the colors of the Quartermaster Corps from which the 39th Transportation Battalion is descended. The ultramarine blue mountain refers to the terrain of Burma. The palm tree refers to Vietnam service and the anchor is a traditional symbol of the Transportation Corps' mission of loading and off-loading at debarkation ports.

Background: The coat of arms was approved on 4 September 1992.


36th QM Battalion (Mobile) * (former 1st BN, 21st QM Reg) (See CBI Unit Histories)

The parent unit of the 36th Transportation Battalion (Truck) was the 1st Battalion of the 21st Quartermaster Regiment (Truck-Corps). It was constituted in the Regular Army on 1 May 1936 and redesignated on 8 January 1940 as the 21st Quartermaster Regiment (Truck).

The 1st Battalion of the 21st Quartermaster Regiment (Truck) was activated at Fort Benning, Georgia on 15 January 1942.

The 36th Quartermaster Battalion, Mobile remained in the CBI Theatre until August of 1945, a total of 29 months, most of which was spent in the jungles of Central Burma, especially around Myitkyina on the Tirap River. In that time, it had under its command for various periods, the 3301st, 3302nd, 3303d, 3304th, 3312th, 3502nd, 4390th, and 373d Quartermaster Truck Companies the 4276th Service Company the 4294th Railhead Company and the two detachments (HQ and medical). It was temporarily attached to the 45th Quartermaster Group from November 1944 to March 1945 and to the 468th Quartermaster Group from 9 April to 11 June 1945.

10th Transportation Company Lineage

  • Constituted 1 May 1936 in the Regular Army as Company A, 1st Battalion, 21st Quartermaster Regiment
  • Activated 15 January 1942 at Fort Benning, Georgia
  • Reorganized and redesignated 16 June 1942 as Company A, 1st Battalion, 21st Quartermaster Truck Regiment
  • Reorganized and redesignated 1 December 1943 as the 3301st Quartermaster Truck Company
  • Inactivated 7 November 1945 at Camp Kilmer, New Jersey
  • Converted and redesignated 1 August 1946 as the 3301st Transportation Corps Truck Company
  • Redesignated 24 February 1947 as the 10th Transportation Corps Truck Company
  • Activated 21 April 1947 at Fort Richardson, Alaska
  • Reorganized and redesignated 12 May 1947 as the 10th Transportation Truck Company
  • Inactivated 23 August 1948 at Fort Richardson, Alaska
  • Redesignated 20 November 1950 as the 10th Transportation Heavy Truck Company
  • Activated 22 December 1950 at Fort Eustis, Virginia
  • Reorganized and redesignated 1 October 1953 as the 10th Transportation Company
  • Inactivated 15 September 1994 at Fort Jackson, South Carolina
  • Activated 16 October 2006 at Hunter Army Airfield, Georgia

Campaign Participation Credit:

  • World War II: India-Burma Central Burma
  • Vietnam: Defense Counteroffensive Counteroffensive, Phase II Counteroffensive, Phase III Tet Counteroffensive Counteroffensive, Phase IV Counteroffensive, Phase V Counteroffensive, Phase VI Tet 69/Counteroffensive Summer-Fall 1969 Winter-Spring 1970 Sanctuary Counteroffensive Counteroffensive, Phase VII Consolidation I Consolidation II
  • Southwest Asia: Defense of Saudi Arabia Liberation and Defense of Kuwait Cease-Fire

Decorations:

  • Meritorious Unit Commendation (Army) for VIETNAM 1965-1966
  • Meritorious Unit Commendation (Army) for VIETNAM 1968-1969
  • Meritorious Unit Commendation (Army) for VIETNAM 1969


39th QM Battalion (Mobile)* (former 2nd BN, 21st QM Reg) (See CBI Unit Histories)

    Constituted 1 May 1936 in the Regular Army as Headquarters and Headquarters Detachment, 2d Battalion, 21st Quartermaster Regiment

Campaign Participation Credit:

Decorations:

Lineage and Honors Information as of 12 February 2008


3305 QM Truck Co.* (former Company E, 21st QM Reg) - Ledo


108th QM Battalion (Mobile)* (former 3d BN, 21st QM Reg)

On 1 December 1943, the 21st Regiment was reorganized and its three battalions were redesignated as Headquarters and Headquarters Detachment (HHD), 36th Quartermaster Battalion HHD, 39th Quartermaster Battalion and HHD, 108th Quartermaster Battalion. The original lettered companies of the 2nd Battalion, E through H, were redesignated 3305th through 3308th Quartermaster Truck Companies respectively and assigned to the 39th Quartermaster Battalion. From then on the companies and battalions would follow separate lineages.

3309 QM Truck Co.* (former Company I, 21st QM Reg) - Myitkyina
3310 QM Truck Co.* (former Company K, 21st QM Reg) - Myitkyina
3311 QM Truck Co.* (former Company L, 21st QM Reg) - Myitkyina

45th QM Truck Regiment* (See CBI Unit Histories)


45th CSG

The 45th Corps Support Group (Forward) prepares for worldwide deployment, and when directed, provides combat support and combat service support for military operations.

The 45th Corps Support Group (Forward) was originally constituted on May 1, 1936, in the Regular Army as the 45th Quartermaster Regiment (Truck).

It was initially activated on May 9, 1942, at the Oakland sub-port of embarkation, California, as the 45th Quartermaster Truck Regiment.

Elements of the regiment separated on December 1, 1943, and received new destinations. The Headquarters and Headquarters Detachment became HHD, 45th Quartermaster Group.

The Headquarters and Headquarters Detachment, 1st, 2nd and 3d battalions became Headquarters and Headquarters Detachment, 45th, 68th, and 120th Quartermaster Battalions (Mobile) respectively. Companies A through M were redesignated as the 3461st through 3472d Quartermaster Truck Companies. The Headquarters and Headquarters Detachment, 45th Quartermaster Group, then deactivated at Camp Kilmer, New Jersey, on November 26, 1945.

On March 30, 1966, the Group was designated as Headquarters and Headquarters Company, 45th Support Group. Activation followed on May 4, 1966, at Fort Lee, Virginia. The Group was deactivated on December 15, 1970, at Fort Lewis, Washington. On September 15, 1972, the 45th Support Group saw its latest activation at Fort Shafter, Hawaii.

In August 1986, the 45th Support Group was reorganized to include command and control of the 7th Maintenance Battalion, the 124th Transportation Battalion, the 84th Engineer Battalion (Combat)(Heavy), the 29th Engineer Battalion (Topographic), and the 125th Finance Battalion.

On October 16, 1993, the 45th Support Group was redesignated as the 45th Corps Support Group (Forward), the 7th Maintenance Battalion was redesignated as the 17th Corps Support Battalion, and the 124th Transportation Battalion was redesignated as the 524th Corps Support Battalion.
(* Negro Unit)


45th QM Battalion (Mobile)* (former 1st BN, 45th QM Reg) (See CBI Unit Histories)

On 1 December 1943, the 45th QM Regiment was broken up and the units were redesignated. The 45th Quartermaster Truck Regiment became the 45th Quartermaster Group with the 1st Battalion redesignated the Headquarters and Headquarters Detachment, 45th Quartermaster Battalion, Mobile and the 2nd Battalion became 68th Quartermaster Battalion, Mobile. The Companies A through M were also redesignated to numbered companies and followed separate lineages.


68th QM Battalion (Mobile)* (former 2nd BN, 45th QM Reg) (See CBI Unit Histories)

The 68th Corps Support Battalion was constituted 1 May 1936, in the Regular Army as Headquarters, 2nd Battalion, 45th Quartermaster Regiment. On 1 April 1942, it was redesignated as Headquarters, 2nd Battalion, 45th Quartermaster Truck Regiment.

On 1 December 1943, the 45th QM Truck Regiment was broken up and the units were redesignated. The 45th QM Regiment became the 45th Quartermaster Group and the 2nd Battalion became Headquarters and Headquarters Detachment, 68th Quartermaster Battalion, Mobile. The lettered companies were also redesignated to numbered companies and followed separate lineages.


120th QM Battalion (Mobile)* (former 3d BN, 45th QM Reg) (See CBI Unit Histories)

On 1 December 1943, the 45th QM Regiment was broken up and the units were redesignated. The 45th Quartermaster Truck Regiment became the 45th Quartermaster Group with the 1st Battalion redesignated the Headquarters and Headquarters Detachment, 45th Quartermaster Battalion, Mobile and the 2nd Battalion became 68th Quartermaster Battalion, Mobile. The Companies A through M were also redesignated to numbered companies and followed separate lineages.

3469 QM Truck Co.* (former Company I, 45th QM Reg) - Ledo
3470 QM Truck Co.* (former Company K, 45th QM Reg) - Ledo
3471 QM Truck Co.* (former Company L, 45th QM Reg) - Ledo
3472 QM Truck Co.* (former Company M, 45th QM Reg) - Ledo

  • Constituted 1 May 1936 in the Regular Army as Company M, 3d Battalion, 45th Quartermaster Regiment
  • Redesignated 1 April 1942 as Company M, 3d Battalion, 45th Quartermaster Truck Regiment
  • Activated 9 May 1942 at Oakland, California
  • Reorganized and redesignated 1 December 1943 as the 3472d Quartermaster Truck Company
  • Inactivated 26 November 1945 at Camp Kilmer, New Jersey
  • Converted and redesignated 1 August 1946 as the 3472d Transportation Corps Truck Company
  • Redesignated 6 March 1947 as the 62d Transportation Corps Truck Company
  • Activated 14 April 1947 at Fort Eustis, Virginia
  • Redesignated 7 July 1947 as the 62d Transportation Truck Company
  • Reorganized and redesignated 3 June 1949 as the 62d Transportation Heavy Truck Company
  • Reorganized and redesignated 1 October 1953 as the 62d Transportation Company
  • Inactivated 15 April 1993 at Fort Bliss, Texas
  • Activated 16 September 2006 at Fort Richardson, Alaska

Campaign Participation Credit:

  • World War II: India-Burma Central Burma
  • Vietnam: Defense Counteroffensive Counteroffensive, Phase II Counteroffensive, Phase III Tet Counteroffensive Counteroffensive, Phase IV Counteroffensive, Phase V Counteroffensive, Phase VI Tet 69/Counteroffensive Summer-Fall 1969 Winter-Spring 1970 Sanctuary Counteroffensive Counteroffensive, Phase VII Consolidation I Consolidation II Cease-Fire
  • Southwest Asia: Defense of Saudi Arabia Liberation and Defense of Kuwait Cease-Fire

Decorations:

  • Meritorious Unit Commendation (Army) for VIETNAM 1965-1966
  • Meritorious Unit Commendation (Army) for VIETNAM 1968-1969
  • Meritorious Unit Commendation (Army) for VIETNAM 1969
  • Meritorious Unit Commendation (Army) for SOUTHWEST ASIA 1990-1991
  • Republic of Vietnam Cross of Gallantry with Palm for VIETNAM 1971

253d QM Regiment


468th QM Regiment


78th QM Battalion (Mobile)*

Ledo (by 30 Sep 45)
(* Negro Unit)


159th QM Battalion (Mobile) (former 3d BN, 468th QM Truck Reg)

Meritorious Unit Commendation: 1 Jan-30 Jun 44, GO 44, Hq SOS IBT, dtd 25 Feb 45 1 Jul-31 Dec 44, GO 93, Hq SOS IBT, dtd 9 May 45.

3312nd QM Truck Co.* (former Company I, 468th QM Reg) - Myitkyina
3502nd QM Truck Co.* (former Company K, 468th QM Reg) - Ledo
3504th QM Truck Co.* (former Company L, 468th QM Reg) - Ledo
4048th QM Truck Co.* (former Company M, 468th QM Reg) - Ledo

472nd QM Truck Regiment (See CBI Unit Histories)

  • Activated at Camp Sutton, NC February 1943
  • Redesignated 472nd QM Group by September 1945



472nd QM Battalion (Mobile)

  • Constituted 10 March 1922 in the Organized Reserves as Motor Transport Company No. 593
  • Organized about November 1922 in New York, New York
  • Redesignated 23 March 1925 as the 593d Motor Transport Company
  • Reorganized and redesignated 1 July 1936 as Company I, 3d Battalion, 472d Quartermaster Regiment
  • Redesignated 1 April 1942 as Company I, 3d Battalion, 472d Quartermaster Truck Regiment
  • Ordered into active military service 15 February 1943 at Camp Sutton, North Carolina
  • Reorganized and redesignated 1 December 1943 as the 3729th Quartermaster Truck Company
  • Inactivated 19 December 1945 at Camp Kilmer, New Jersey
  • Converted and redesignated 1 August 1946 as the 3729th Transportation Corps Truck Company
  • Redesignated 19 May 1947 as the 319th Transportation Truck Company
  • Activated 1 June 1947 at Albany, Georgia
  • (Organized Reserves redesignated 25 March 1948 as the Organized Reserve Corps redesignated 9 July 1952 as the Army Reserve)
  • Inactivated 1 April 1950 at Albany, Georgia
  • Activated 1 January 1951 at Savannah, Georgia
  • Inactivated 1 February 1952 at Savannah, Georgia
  • Redesignated 18 July 1955 as the 319th Transportation Company
  • Activated 29 July 1955 at Macon, Georgia
  • Location changed 1 February 1957 to Cartersville, Georgia
  • Inactivated 15 November 1957 at Cartersville, Georgia
  • Activated 1 June 1959 at Fort Valley, Georgia
  • Location changed 1 November 1959 to Albany, Georgia
  • Ordered into active military service 15 October 1961 at Albany, Georgia released from active military service 12 August 1962 and reverted to reserve status
  • Location changed 31 December 1965 to Augusta, Georgia
  • Ordered into active military service 13 May 1968 at Augusta, Georgia released from active military service 19 August 1969 and reverted to reserve status
  • Ordered into active military service 17 November 1990 at Augusta, Georgia released from active military service 2 June 1991 and reverted to reserve status
  • Element ordered into active military service 1 November 2002 at Augusta, Georgia remainder of company ordered into active military service 16 January 2003 at Augusta, Georgia
  • Element released from active military service 31 October 2003 and reverted to reserve status remainder of company released from active military service 15 January 2004 and reverted to reserve status
  • Ordered into active military service 30 March 2010 at Augusta, Georgia released from active military service 3 May 2011 and reverted to reserve status

Campaign Participation Credit:

  • World War II: Asiatic-Pacific Theater, Streamer without inscription
  • Vietnam: Counteroffensive, Phase V Counteroffensive, Phase VI Tet 69/Counteroffensive Summer-Fall 1969
  • Southwest Asia: Liberation and Defense of Kuwait Cease-Fire
  • War on Terrorism: Campaigns to be determined

Decorations:

  • Presidential Unit Citation (Navy), Streamer embroidered IRAQ 2003
  • * Meritorious Unit Commendation (Army), Streamer embroidered INDIA JAN-JUN 1944
  • * Meritorious Unit Commendation (Army), Streamer embroidered INDIA JUL-DEC 1944
  • Meritorious Unit Commendation (Army), Streamer embroidered VIETNAM 1968-1969
  • Meritorious Unit Commendation (Army), Streamer embroidered SOUTHWEST ASIA 1991

* Meritorious Unit Commendation: 1 Jan -30 Jun 44, GO 44, Hq SOS IBT, dtd 25 Feb 45 1 Jul-31 Dec 44, GO 93, Hq SOS IBT, dtd 9 May 45.

Lineage and Honors Information as of 13 July 2011



The following were assigned to the ?? QM BN, 472nd QM Truck Reg:

3724th QM Truck Co. (former Company D, 472nd QM Reg) - Tezpur


Photo courtesy of Mr. David Krier

3731st QM Truck Co. (former Company L, 472nd QM Reg) *
3732nd QM Truck Co. (former Company M, 472nd QM Reg) *


478th QM Truck Regiment (See CBI Unit Histories)


88th QM Battalion (Mobile) (former 2nd BN, 478th QM Reg)


Hq & Hq Detachment (Capt Harold N. Wood, commander - front)
Photo courtesy of Mr. James Gavin (2nd from left)
  • Constituted 1 July 1936 in the Organized Reserves as Company B, 1st Battalion, 478th Quartermaster Truck Regiment
  • Ordered into active military service 25 October 1942 and organized at Camp Claiborne, Louisiana
  • Reorganized and redesignated 1 December 1943 as the 3842d Quartermaster Truck Company
  • Inactivated 3 February 1946 in India
  • Converted and redesignated 1 August 1946 as the 3842d Transportation Corps Truck Company
  • Redesignated 18 March 1947 as the 497th Transportation Corps Truck Company
  • Activated 3 April 1947 at Oklahoma City, Oklahoma
  • Redesignated 14 October 1947 as the 497th Transportation Truck Company
  • (Organized Reserves redesignated 25 March 1948 as the Organized Reserve Corps redesignated 9 July 1952 as the Army Reserve)
  • Inactivated 15 March 1952 at Oklahoma City, Oklahoma
  • Redesignated 1 December 1958 as the 497th Transportation Company
  • Activated 29 January 1959 at Oklahoma City, Oklahoma
  • Location changed 1 April 1959 to Tulsa, Oklahoma
  • Inactivated 25 February 1963 at Tulsa, Oklahoma
  • Withdrawn 7 February 1967 from the Army Reserve and allotted to the Regular Army
  • Activated 25 March 1967 at Fort Lewis, Washington

Campaign Participation Credit:

  • World War II: India-Burma Central Burma
  • Southwest Asia: Defense of Saudi Arabia Liberation and Defense of Kuwait Cease-Fire
  • War on Terrorism: Campaigns to be determined

Decorations:

  • Meritorious Unit Commendation (Army), Streamer embroidered SOUTHWEST ASIA 1990-1991
  • Meritorious Unit Commendation (Army), Streamer embroidered IRAQ 2004-2005
  • Army Superior Unit Award, Streamer embroidered 1996-1997

3848th QM Truck Co. - Ledo
3851st QM Truck Co.


5300th Air Supply Dropping Platoon (Prov)
5301st Air Supply Dropping Platoon (Prov)
5302nd Air Supply Dropping Platoon (Prov)
5331st Air Supply Dropping Platoon (Prov)


173d QM Battalion (Mobile)

?? QM Companies


478th QM Battalion (Mobile)*


516th QM Regiment


3d BN, 516th QM Reg


Quartermaster Battalions

NOTE: This section lists Battalions whose Regimental assignments are NOT identified above.

    47th QM Battalion (Mobile)* - Calcutta

  • 3649th QM Truck Co.* - Shingbwiyang
  • 3650th QM Truck Co.* - Shingbwiyang
  • 3651st QM Truck Co.* - Shingbwiyang
  • 3652nd QM Truck Co.* - Shingbwiyang


Quartermaster Companies

NOTE: This section lists Companies whose Battalion assignments are NOT identified above.

1st QM Butchery Shop
31st QM Pack Troop - North Malir (see Army Ground Forces)

33d QM Pack Troop - North Malir (see Army Ground Forces)
35th QM Pack Troop - North Malir (see Army Ground Forces)
37th QM Pack Troop - North Malir (see Army Ground Forces)
49th QM Graves Registration Co. #
51st QM Large Drum Manufacturing Co. - Tezgaon

68th QM Refrigeration Co.
111th QM Bakery Co. - Ledo

115th QM Bakery Co. - Dikom

  • Constituted 14 December 1920 as 43d Division Quartermaster Train and allotted to Maine, Connecticut, Rhode Island and Vermont
  • Redesignated 118th Quartermaster Regiment 1 May 1936
  • Company D Federally recognized 23 April 1937 at Providence, RI
  • Inducted into Federal service 24 February 1941
  • Company D redesignated 19 February 1942 as 185th Quartermaster Company, Depot Supply inactivated 22 April 1946 in India. (118th Quartermaster Regiment reconstituted 21 May 1946 allotted, less all elements except Company D, 2 July 1946 to Rhode Island National Guard as 43d Quartermaster Company)

194th QM Co. (Serv Gp) - Assigned 25 ASG Aug 42
245th QM Truck Co. #
252nd QM Pack Troop - North Malir (see Army Ground Forces)

675th QM Base Depot Co. #
698th QM Remount Troop - Ledo (see Medical Service Units, Veterinary Units)
699th QM Remount Troop - Shillong (see Medical Service Units, Veterinary Units)
846 QM Co. (Truck, Avn) - Assigned 25 ASG Aug 42
877th QM Co. - 3d ADG #
961st QM Petroleum Products Laboratory - Chittagong (See CBI Unit Histories)

Awards: ROK-PUC, 19 Sep 50-31 Jul 52, Department of the Army General Order 33-53 ROK-PUC, 1 Aug 52-30 Sep 53, Department of the Army General Order 23-54

Campaigns: Second Korean Winter, Korea Summer-Fall 1952, Third Korean Winter, Korea Summer-Fall 1953

Courtesy of Mr. John Beemer, Directorate of Plans, Training, Mobilization and Security, Fort Sill, OK:

962nd QM Petroleum Products Laboratory - Activated 5 Aug 43 at Camp Phillips, KS Budge Budge (See CBI Unit Histories)
963d QM Petroleum Products Laboratory - Activated 5 Aug 43 at Fort Leonard Wood, MO Karachi (See CBI Unit Histories)

Attached to Base General Depot No. 1, India-Burma Theater at Karachi, India. Later attached to 380 Air Service Group for rations, quarters and administration.

975th QM Supply Co. #
981st QM Co. - Shamshernagar #

1077th QM Co. (Serv Gp, Avn) - 14 ASG

Activated at Santa Maria AAB, CA 25 Mar 43. All-Chinese unit. Stationed at Luliang, China by Jan 45 with detachments operating on other bases in China. Unit moved from Chanyi, China to Tsingchen, China Jun 45.

1080th QM Co. (Serv Gp, Avn) - 44 ASG

1081st QM Co. (Serv Gp, Avn) - 54 ASG

Activated at Greenville Army Air Base, SC on 1 Apr 43. Detached from 54th ASG c. Nov 43 though shipped to Casa Blana with 499th Serv. Sq. Rejoined 54th ASG c. Jan 44. Unit stationed in India and has detachments in Sylhet, Fenny and Chittagong, India by Jun 44.

1084th QM Co. (Serv Gp, Avn) - 61 ASG

Activated 1 Apr 43 at Santa Maria AAB, CA. Unit at Salua, India by Sep 45. Unit at Dudkhundi, with detachments at Piardoba, Salua and Kalaikunda, India by Oct 45.

Pictured is the 1084th Q.M. Company, a group of wonderful, hard working men. I was the Section Chief of Property. The officers were Capt. Gallagher, Lt. Bright, Capt. Stock and Lt. Miller.

I left Calcutta on the Marine Wolf in Jan. 1946 through the South China Sea docked in California on Feb. 8, 1946.


Some of the men of the 1984th QM Co. - Photo courtesy of Mr. Robert Sarlo

1098th QM Co. (Serv Gp, Avn) - 52 ASG

1100th QM Co. (Serv Gp, Avn) - Chabua, India

Activated as a Detachment at Morrison Field, West Palm Beach, FL, Sep 41. Went overseas to India 13 Mar 42, later having supply detachments in Karachi, India and Kunming, China. 25 Sep 43, was redesignated as the 114 Quartermaster Company Service Group (Aviation). Redesignated 1100 Quartermaster Company Service Group (Aviation) 9 May 43. Stationed at Chabua, India by Sep 43.

1106th QM Co. (Serv Gp, Avn) - 301 ASG

1116th QM Co. (Serv Gp, Avn) - 329 ASG

1139th QM Co. (Serv Gp, Avn) - 315 ASG

Activated as Detachment 3, Quartermaster Company Supply (Aviation) c. 1 Jun 41 at Baton Rouge Air Base, LA. Redesignated Detachment 3, Quartermaster Company (Supply Aviation) , 1 Apr 42 186 Quartermaster Platoon Service Center (Aviation) 22 Apr 42 186 Quartermaster Company Service Group (Aviation) 14 Aug 42 1139 Quartermaster Company Service Group (Aviation) 15 May 43. Unit left for overseas duty 21 Sep 42 in the Middle East. (Transferred to CBI, date unknown.) Relocated from Hsingching to Shanghai, China. Movement order received 29 Nov 45 final preparations made for embarkation.

1142nd QM Co. (Serv Gp, Avn) - 305 ASG


Photo courtesy of Mrs. Deborah Wilster Barker, daughter of James Thomas Wilster (back row, 5th from left)

1147th QM Co. (Serv Gp, Avn) - 25 ASG

1151st QM Co. (Serv Gp, Avn) - 68 ASG

1600th Quartermaster Car Co. - Depot Field (later Harmon Field), Guam

1905th QM Co. (Truck, Avn) (Colored) - 301 ASG

1935th QM Co. (Truck, Avn) (Colored) - Chabua, India

1940th QM Co. (Truck, Avn) (Colored) - Karachi, India

Activated 6 Mar 41 Barksdale Field, LA. Served in Middle East, then to India. Renumbered from 752 QM Truck Co per WD AG 320.1 (8-28-42) Letter, Subject: Redesignation and Reorganization of Quartermaster Companies, Truck, with the Army Air Forces, Sep 12, 1942.

1953d QM Co. (Truck, Avn) - 25 ASG - Kharagpur, India

Renumbered from 765 QM Truck Co per WD AG 320.1 (8-28-42) Letter, Subject: Redesignation and Reorganization of Quartermaster Companies, Truck, with the Army Air Forces, Sep 12, 1942. Located at Piardoba, India -Jun 44. Unit disbanded 30 Jun 44.

1959th QM Co. (Truck, Avn) - 305 ASG - Ondal, India

Activated as 771 Quartermaster Company (Truck) 9 Mar 42 at Savannah Army Air Base, GA. Renumbered 19 Sep 42 from 771 QM Truck Co per WD AG 320.1 (8-28-42) Letter, Subject: Redesignation and Reorganization of Quartermaster Companies, Truck, with the Army Air Forces, Sep 12, 1942. Stationed at Ondal, India. Unit deactivated 19 Jan 46.

1961st QM Co. (Truck, Avn) - 301 ASG

773d Quartermaster Company (Truck) activated 13 Mar 40 at Key Fld, MS. Assigned to 301st Serv Gp 15 Aug 42. Moved to Selfridge Field 15 Oct 42. Renumbered from 773 QM Truck Co per WD AG 320.1 (8-28-42) Letter, Subject: Redesignation and Reorganization of Quartermaster Companies, Truck, with the Army Air Forces, Sep 12, 1942. Departed for Calcutta, India 18 Aug 43. Reassigned c. 20 Sep 43. Unit located near Deoladie, India.

1980th QM Co. (Truck, Avn) - 315 ASG

Constituted 17 Feb 42 as 792nd QM Co., activated 25 Feb 42 at Gowan Field, Boise, ID redesignated 8 Dec 42 1980th QM Truck Co, Avn per WD AG 320.1 (8-28-42) Letter, Subject: Redesignation and Reorganization of Quartermaster Companies, Truck, with the Army Air Forces, Sep 12, 1942 Left 21 Sep 42 for foreign duty in the Middle East. Moved to India & China first half of 44. Inactivated 6 Jan 46 at Ft Lawton. Redesignated 1980th Transportation Corps Truck Co 1 Aug 46 redesignated 251st Transportation Truck Co 19 Apr 48 activated 29 Sep 48 at Kenton, OH redesignated 251st Transportation Co 2 Jun 53 moved 17 Sep 02 to Saginaw MI.

1989th QM Co. (Truck, Avn) - 68 ASG

Activated as Company "I", 30th Quartermaster Regiment, at Moffett Field, CA 1 Jul 40. Redesignated 803d Quartermaster Company (Truck) 2 Feb 42. Redesignated 1989th Quartermaster Company Truck (Aviation) 19 Sep 42. Went overseas to Kweilin, China 30 Jan 44, with detachments at Kunming, Yangkai, Chanyi, Tsuyung, Chenekung and Yunnanyi.

1991st QM Co. (Truck, Avn) - Kharagpur

Activated as Company "D", 33 Quartermaster Company (Truck) 10 Jan 42 at Williams Field, Chandler, AZ. Redesignated 28 Sep 42 1991 Quartermaster Company (Truck). Went overseas to Sale Air Base, French Morocco and then to Otherwise Air Base, Montesquieu, Algeria. Unit moved from Catania, Sicily to Foggia, Italy Nov 43. Unit moved from Italy to Corsica Apr 44. Moved to CBI date unknown.

1993d QM Co. (Truck, Avn) (Colored) - 52 ASG

Renumbered from 822 QM Truck Co per WD AG 320.1 (8-28-42) Letter, Subject: Redesignation and Reorganization of Quartermaster Companies, Truck, with the Army Air Forces, Sep 12, 1942. Transferred from Myitkyina, Burma to Pandaveswar, Madhaiganj area, India c. fall 1945. Inactivated 24 Dec 45.

2000th QM Co. (Truck, Avn) (Colored) - 305 ASG - Ondal, India

Organized as Company "D", 32 Quartermaster Regiment at Napier Field, AL 3 Dec 41. Redesignated 828 Quartermaster Company Truck 10 Jan 42. Renumbered 19 Sep 42 from 828 QM Truck Co per WD AG 320.1 (8-28-42) Letter, Subject: Redesignation and Reorganization of Quartermaster Companies, Truck, with the Army Air Forces, Sep 12, 1942. Went to Ondal, India, arriving 8 Jan 44. Unit Deactivated 14 Jan 46.

2003d QM Co. (Truck, Avn) (Colored) - 52 ASG - Jorhat / Myitkyina

Activated as Company "G", 32 Quartermaster Regiment Truck at Maxwell Field, AL 15 Nov 41. Redesignated 831 Quartermaster Company (Truck) 10 Jan 42. Renumbered 19 Sep 42 from 831 QM Truck Co per WD AG 320.1 (8-28-42) Letter, Subject: Redesignation and Reorganization of Quartermaster Companies, Truck, with the Army Air Forces, Sep 12, 1942. Went overseas to Jorhat, India 22 Sep 43. Deactivated 24 Dec 45.

2010th QM Co. (Truck, Avn) (Colored) - Calcutta / Chabua

Activated as Company "B", 34 Quartermaster Regiment at Kelly Field, TX 19 May 41. Redesignated 838 Quartermaster Company (Truck) 10 Jan 42 Renumbered 3 Nov 42 from 838 QM Truck Co per WD AG 320.1 (8-28-42) Letter, Subject: Redesignation and Reorganization of Quartermaster Companies, Truck, with the Army Air Forces, Sep 12, 1942. Went overseas to Camp Howrah, India, near Calcutta, 29 Jan 44. Company went from Calcutta to Chabua, India c. Mar 44.

2018th QM Co. (Truck, Avn) (Colored) - 25 ASG - Piardoba, India

Renumbered from 846 QM Truck Co per WD AG 320.1 (8-28-42) Letter, Subject: Redesignation and Reorganization of Quartermaster Companies, Truck, with the Army Air Forces, Sep 12, 1942. Unit located at Piardoba, India by May 44. Unit inoperative as of Dec 45.

2033d QM Co. (Truck, Avn) (Colored) - 52 ASG

192nd Assault Helicopter Company

The 192nd Assault Helicopter Company's crest was designed and drawn by Major Smith, then the Company XO, and Warrant Officer Tidey. It was conceived by Major Smith, who drew the basic desired design, and then turned the final work over to Warrant Officer Tidey. The crest was completed and presented to Major Baker, the Company Commander, who approved it in early September of 1967.

All of the major items of the crest were chosen for a significant reason. The shield was chosen to represent our offensive as well as defensive capabilities. The "flying white horse" represented the unit's task upon arrival in Vietnam: the aerial support of the Republic of Korea's "White Horse" Division. The buttressed line dividing the top and bottom portions of the shield was selected for its heraldic portrayal of an embattlement. It was thought to be very appropriate to incorporate such a symbol into the crest since the unit was to leave for Vietnam in early October 1967.

The colors used in the crest were also chosen for a symbolic meaning. The teal blue and gold are the colors of Army aviation. The black was chosen as it represented our night flying capabilities, the white for the "White Horse" Division. The motto "WE BOW TO NONE" was selected to depict our stated ambition and professional competence to equal or surpass those who are "ABOVE THE BEST".

2043d QM Co. (Truck, Avn) (Colored) - 329 ASG

2050th QM Co. (Truck, Avn) (Colored) - 68 ASG / 301 ASG / 52 ASG (26 Dec 43)

2051st QM Co. (Truck, Avn) (Colored) - 68 ASG (transferred to ?, 26 Dec 43)
2080th QM Co. (Truck, Avn) - 54 ASG

2081st QM Co. (Truck, Avn) - 54 ASG

  • Constituted 28 December 1942 in the Army of the United States as the 2081st Quartermaster Truck Company, Aviation
  • Activated 1 January 1943 at Key Field, Mississippi
  • Inactivated 3 February 1946 in India
  • Converted and redesignated 1 August 1946 as the 2081st Transportation Corps Truck Company
  • Redesignated 9 August 1948 as the 619th Transportation Truck Company and allotted to the Organized Reserve Corps
  • Activated 24 August 1948 at Bridgeport, Connecticut
  • Reorganized and redesignated 5 October 1950 as the 619th Transportation Heavy Truck Company
  • Inactivated 9 May 1951 at Bridgeport, Connecticut (Organized Reserve Corps redesignated 9 July 1952 as the Army Reserve)
  • Redesignated 15 April 1959 as the 619th Transportation Company
  • Activated 11 May 1959 at Bridgton, Maine
  • Inactivated 22 December 1965 at Bridgton, Maine
  • Activated 31 January 1968 at Auburn, Maine
  • Ordered into active military service 11 October 1990 at Auburn, Maine released from active military service 26 May 1991 and reverted to reserve status
  • Ordered into active military service 7 December 2003 at Auburn, Maine released from active military service 3 June 2005 and reverted to reserve status
  • Ordered into active military service 25 June 2009 at Auburn, Maine released from active military service 29 July 2010 and reverted to reserve status

Campaign Participation Credit: World War II: European-African-Middle Eastern Theater, Streamer without inscription Asiatic-Pacific Theater, Streamer without inscription. Southwest Asia: Defense of Saudi Arabia Liberation and Defense of Kuwait Cease-Fire. War on Terrorism: Campaigns to be determined

Decorations: Meritorious Unit Commendation (Army), Streamer embroidered SOUTHWEST ASIA 1990-1991

Lineage and Honors Information as of 23 December 2010

2082nd QM Co. (Truck, Avn) - Kurmitola, India

Activated 1 Jan 43 at Santa Maria Army Air Base, CA. Left 9 Nov 43 for overseas duty in India. Move from Calcutta, India to Chungking, China, in Apr 45.

2116th QM Co. (Truck, Avn) (Colored) - 44 ASG

2117th QM Co. (Truck, Avn) (Colored) - 44 ASG

2118th QM Co. (Truck, Avn) (Colored) - 54 ASG

2119th QM Co. (Truck, Avn) (Colored) - 54 ASG

2121st QM Co. (Truck, Avn) - 14 ASG

Activated 1 Apr 43 at Syracuse Army Air Base, NY (55 Service Gp) Transferred overseas to Army Air Base Chanyi, China effective 28 Feb 44 Company composed of Americans of Chinese ancestry. Unit personnel trained Chinese Air Service personnel in motor transport skills at Chihkiang, China. Unit disbanded, starting on 10 Aug 45 personnel transferred to other organizations.

2122nd QM Co. (Truck, Avn) - 14 ASG

Activated on 1 Apr 43 at Dale Mabry Fld, FL. Stationed at Charleston AAB, SC (56 Service Gp) -unknown. Transferred to Tseyung, China Feb 45. Unit assigned to Peishiyi, China Apr 45 unit moved in convoy on 27 May 45 to Enshih, China. Unit prepared to move to Kunming, China Jul 45.

2124th QM Co. (Truck, Avn) - 61 ASG / 12 ASG / 382 ASG

  • Constituted 10 March 1943 in the Army of the United States as the 2124th Quartermaster Truck Company, Aviation
  • Activated 1 April 1943 at Santa Maria Army Air Base, California (61 Service Group)
  • Elements of the unit in Burma, India and China Mar-May 45 (Nawadih, Shamshernagar, Chittagong, Cox's Bazaar). Unit moved to Peishiyi, China Jul 45. Unit elements moved to Chinkiang, China Aug 45. Organization located at Hankow, China, in preparation for return to the United States moved to Shanghai, China to board transport home on 17 Nov 45
  • Unit deactivated at Camp Stoneman, California on 8 December 1945
  • Converted and redesignated 1 August 1946 as the 2124th Transportation Corps Truck Company
  • Redesignated 10 September 1948 as the 208th Transportation Base Depot Company and allotted to the Organized Reserve Corps
  • Activated 1 October 1948 at Chicago, Illinois
  • Inactivated 30 March 1951 at Chicago, Illinois
  • (Organized Reserve Corps redesignated 9 July 1952 as the Army Reserve)
  • Redesignated 18 September 1956 as the 208th Transportation Company and activated at Canton, Illinois
  • Inactivated 31 January 1968 at Canton, Illinois
  • Activated 16 October 1995 at Tucson, Arizona
  • Ordered into active military service 7 December 2003 at Tucson, Arizona released from active military service 3 June 2005 and reverted to reserve status
  • Location changed 1 August 2011 to Red Rock, Arizona

CAMPAIGN PARTICIPATION CREDIT

  • World War II: China OffensiveCentral Burma
  • War on Terrorism: Iraq: Transition of Iraq Iraqi Governance

DECORATIONS

2125th QM Co. (Truck, Avn) - 61 ASG

Activated on 1 Apr 43 at Santa Maria Army Air Base, CA moved unit to Pendleton Field, OR on 10 Dec 43. Unit moved to Shinching, China Sep 45.

2257th QM Co. (Truck, Avn) - 52 ASG

1 Provisional Quartermaster Truck Company was redesignated 2257 Quartermaster Truck Company (Aviation) 22 Apr 45 at Herbert Smart Airport, Macon, GA. Unit is manned with colored personnel. Unit at Warazup, Burma after leaving India on the Ledo Road (drove over the Hump c. Apr 45.) Unit moved to Namponmao, Burma. Worked with the 4 Combat Cargo Group Jun 45. Unit moved back to India from Burma and was deactivated 24 Dec 45.

2258th QM Co. (Truck, Avn) - Shingbwiyang, Burma

2 Provisional Quartermaster Truck Company was redesignated 2258 Quartermaster Truck Company (Aviation) 22 Apr 44, at Herbert Smart Airport, Macon, GA. Manned with colored personnel. Went overseas to Shingbwiyang, Burma. Unit moved to Ledo (Lekhapani), India from Shingbwiyang, Burma 8 May 45. Unit at Chabua, India c. Aug 45.

2259th QM Co. (Truck, Avn) - Shambernagar, India
2260th QM Co. (Truck, Avn) - Calcutta, India

Activated at Herbert Smart Airport, Macon, GA 22 Apr 44. Unit stationed at Ranaghat India c. Sep 45. Unit was inactivated 16 Mar 46.

2261st QM Co. (Truck, Avn) - 61 ASG detached to 382 ASG by 31 Mar 45
2424th QM Co. (Truck, Avn) #
2459th QM Co. (Truck, Avn)

Source: Sue Foley (granddaughter of Walter Brady, 2459 QM Truck Co.)

  • Activated 15 Mar 43 at San Bernardino, CA.
  • Camp Anza, CA, 18 Aug 43
  • Los Angeles POE, 5 Sep 43
  • Departed Los Angeles POE, 7 Sep 43
  • Arrived Bombay, India, 20 Oct 43 (via Tasmania & Australia)
  • Agra, India, 25 Oct 43
  • Panagarh, India, 23 Jan 44
  • Calcutta, India, 18 Sep 44
  • Siliguri, India, 20 Sep 44
  • Jorhat, India, 27 Sep 44
  • Chabua, India, 6 Apr 45
  • Travel to Peishiyi, China, 11 Apr-3 May 45
  • Liangshen, China, 22 Jun 45

2472nd QM Co. (Truck, Avn) - Kanchrapara (assigned to 22 ADG)

Organized 16 Apr 42 at Patterson Field, OH. Tinker Fld, OK (22 Air Depot Gp) -unknown. Unit assigned to China-Burma-India Theater May 45. Unit scheduled to move to China Jun 45.

2473d QM Co. (Truck, Avn) #
2476th QM Co. (Truck, Avn) - Agra, India
2478th QM Co. (Truck, Avn) - 380 ASG

2480th QM Co. (Truck, Avn) - Barrackpore, India

2485th QM Co. (Truck, Avn) (Colored) - 14 ADG

Activated 21 Mar 42 at Duncan Field, TX. Stationed at Pinecastle AAF, FL (45 Air Depot Gp) -unknown.

2494th QM Co. (Truck, Avn) (Colored)

Activated at Macon, GA 9 May 42. Unit moved to the front where battle of Tunis developed. Transfers to Burma-India Theater. Transferred from 329th ASG to 14 ADG. Unit in Shanghai, China by Jan 45.

3074th QM Refrigeration Co. - Calcutta
3099th QM Salvage Repair Co.* - Ledo
3100th QM Salvage Repair Co.* - Calcutta

3645th QM Truck Co.* - Ledo
3646th QM Truck Co.* - Ledo
3647th QM Truck Co.* - Ledo
3648th QM Truck Co.* - Ledo
3731st QM Truck Co. #
3841st QM Truck Co. - Shingbwiyang
3843d QM Truck Co. #
3844th QM Truck Co. - Ledo
3845th QM Truck Co. - Myitkyina
3846th QM Truck Co. - Ledo
3847th QM Truck Co. #
3848th QM Truck Co.
3849th QM Truck Co. - Bhamo
3850th QM Truck Co. - Ledo
3852nd QM Truck Co.
3925th QM Truck Co.

3962nd QM Truck Co.* - Ledo
3963d QM Truck Co. - Ledo
3964th QM Truck Co. - Ledo
3969th QM Truck Co.* - Ledo
3970th QM Truck Co.* - Ledo
3971st QM Truck Co.* - Ledo
3972nd QM Truck Co.* - Ledo
3978th QM Truck Co.* - Kanchrapara
3995th QM Truck Co.* - Ledo
3996th QM Truck Co.* - Ledo
3997th QM Truck Co.* - Ledo North Malir
3998th QM Truck Co.* - Ledo
3999th QM Truck Co.* - Ledo
4014th QM Truck Co.* - Ledo
4023d QM Dump Truck Co.* - Warazup
4024th QM Dump Truck Co.* - Mu-Se
4025th QM Truck Co.* - Ledo
4052nd QM Truck Co.* - Calcutta
4155th QM Truck Co.* - Calcutta
4276th QM Service Co.* - Ledo
4280th QM Depot Co., Base General Depot - Calcutta

# Source: various issues of Ex-CBI Roundup


Quartermaster Detachments

151st QM Laundry Detachment (1000 bed hospital) - Ledo
217th QM Laundry Detachment (1000 bed hospital) - North Malir
232nd QM Laundry Detachment* (500 bed hospital) - Calcutta
350th QM Laundry Detachment* (500 bed hospital) - Chabua
351st QM Laundry Detachment* (500 bed hospital) - Chabua
352nd QM Laundry Detachment* (500 bed hospital) - Myitkyina
353d QM Laundry Detachment* (500 bed hospital) - Myitkyina
421st QM Truck Detachment

  • Constituted 11 April 1945 in the Army of the United States as the 421st Quartermaster Truck Detachment
  • Activated 24 May 1945 on Saipan
  • Inactivated 25 February 1946 on Saipan
  • Converted and redesignated 1 August 1946 as the 421st Transportation Corps Truck Detachment
  • Redesignated 13 June 1947 as the 21st Transportation Truck Detachment
  • Activated 18 June 1947 in Hawaii
  • Inactivated 18 October 1948 in Hawaii
  • Redesignated 26 May 1953 as the 564th Transportation Detachment and allotted to the Regular Army
  • Activated 25 June 1953 in Korea
  • Inactivated 20 December 1954 in Korea
  • Activated 10 December 1958 in Germany
  • Inactivated 25 September 1961 in Germany
  • Activated 24 September 1962 at Fort McPherson, Georgia
  • Inactivated 1 November 1968 in Vietnam
  • Activated 1 September 1969 in Vietnam and assigned to the 1st Cavalry Division
  • Inactivated 10 April 1971 in Vietnam and relieved from assignment to the 1st Cavalry Division
  • Activated 16 September 1979 at Fort Hood, Texas

Campaign Participation Credit:

  • World War II (Asiatic-Pacific Theater): Silver Band without campaign inscription
  • Korean War: Korea, Summer 1953
  • Vietnam: Defense, Counteroffensive, Counteroffensive, Phase II, Counteroffensive, Phase III, Tet Counteroffensive, Counteroffensive, Phase IV, Counteroffensive, Phase V, Summer-Fall 1969, Winter-Spring 1970, Sanctuary Counteroffensive, Counteroffensive, Phase VII
  • Southwest Asia: Defense of Saudi Arabia, Liberation and Defense of Kuwait, Cease-Fire

Decorations:

  • Meritorious Unit Commendation (Army) for VIETNAM 1965-1966
  • Meritorious Unit Commendation (Army) for SOUTHWEST ASIA 1991
  • Republic of Vietnam Cross of Gallantry with Palm for VIETNAM 1969-1970
  • Republic of Vietnam Civil Action Honor Medal, First Class for 1969-1970

426th QM Laundry Detachment (Mobile) - Ledo
427th QM Laundry Detachment (Mobile) - Ledo
428th QM Laundry Detachment (Mobile) - Tezgaon
961st QM Petrol Products Lab (Base) - Chittagong
962nd QM Petrol Products Lab (Base) - Calcutta
963d QM Petrol Products Lab (Mobile) - Karachi
969th QM Supply Detachment - Dikom
970th QM Supply Detachment - Chabua
971st QM Supply Detachment - Chabua
972nd QM Supply Detachment - Chabua
973d QM Supply Detachment - Calcutta
974th QM Supply Detachment - Calcutta
975th QM Supply Detachment - Angus Mills
976th QM Supply Detachment - Activated 11 Jul 45 in China
977th QM Supply Detachment - Activated 11 Jul 45 in China
978th QM Supply Detachment - Activated 11 Jul 45 in China
979th QM Supply Detachment - Activated 11 Jul 45 in China
980th QM Supply Detachment - Activated 11 Jul 45 in China
981st QM Supply Detachment - Shamshernagar (activated in IB theater 6 Jul 45)
982nd QM Supply Detachment - Calcutta
983d QM Supply Detachment - Calcutta
984th QM Supply Detachment - Chabua
985th QM Supply Detachment - Chabua
988th QM Supply Detachment - North Malir
3113th QM Remount Detachment - North Malir
QM Petroleum Salvage Detachment - Chabua
QM Refrigeration Detachment - Calcutta


Quartermaster Platoons

1st QM Butchery Platoon - Ledo
12th QM Bakery Platoon - Ledo
102nd QM Graves Registration Platoon - Ledo
103d QM Graves Registration Platoon - Chabua
104th QM Graves Registration Platoon - Calcutta
105th QM Graves Registration Platoon - Chabua
106th QM Graves Registration Composite Platoon - Kunming
145th QM Supply Platoon - Myitkyina
223d QM Laundry Platoon - Ledo
224th QM Laundry Platoon* - Calcutta
403d QM Platoon (Air Depot Group, Avn) - 3 ADG - Agra, India
414th QM Platoon (Air Depot Group, Avn) - 14 ADG - Bengal AD, India

Activated 18 Apr 42 at Duncan Field, Texas. Traveled up the Yangtze River and the Whangpao River to reach Shanghai, China Nov 45. Went overseas to Townsville, Australia arriving 19 Jun 43. Went from there to Iona, New Guinea and on to Kiriwina island. Move to CBI date unknown. Assigned to 14 ADG. Became the Quartermaster unit of the Shanghai Air Depot.

422nd QM Platoon (Air Depot Group, Avn) - 22 ADG - Kharagpur, India
426th QM Platoon (Air Depot Group, Avn) - 26 ADG - Bangalore, India
428th QM Platoon (Air Depot Group, Avn) - 28 ADG - Barrackpore, India

447th QM Platoon (Air Depot Group, Avn) - 47 ADG - Panagarh, India
449th QM Platoon (Air Depot Group, Avn) - Barrackpore, India

450th QM Platoon (Air Depot Group, Avn) - Activated 15 Mar 43, San Bernardino, CA Karachi, India
456th QM Platoon (Air Depot Group, Avn) - Lalmanirhat Ondal

471st QM Platoon (Air Depot Group, Avn) - Barrackpore, India

472nd QM Platoon (Air Depot Group, Avn) - Calcutta, India
499th QM Platoon (Air Depot Group, Avn) - Bombay, India
3092nd QM Supply Platoon* - Ledo
3276th QM Drum Cleaning Platoon - Myitkyina

3277th QM Drum Filling Platoon - Myitkyina

5300th Air Supply Dropping Platoon (Prov) (478th QM Reg)
5301st Air Supply Dropping Platoon (Prov) (478th QM Reg)
5302nd Air Supply Dropping Platoon (Prov) (478th QM Reg)
5331st Air Supply Dropping Platoon (Prov) (478th QM Reg)


Quartermaster Corps - History

The intent of this webpage is to give a short overview of significant historical events in Army Quartermaster history. Because this page is a work in progress, there are sure to be some omissions and mistakes. Send your comments to: [email protected]

Revolutionary War War of 1812 A Professional Department
Mexican War Civil War Supplying Western Outposts
Spanish-American War Quartermaster Corps Established Punitive Expedition
World War I Between the Wars 1919-1941 World War II
Korean War Vietnam War Post Vietnam
Urgent Fury – Grenada Just Cause – Panama Desert Shield/Storm
Restore Hope – Somalia Uphold Democracy – Haiti Joint Guard – Bosnia

Revolutionary War (1775-83)
“No body ever heard of a quarter Master in History.”
Major General Nathanael Greene, Quartermaster General 1778-80
“that every Citizen who enjoys the protection of a free government, owes not only a proportion of his property, but even his personal service for the defense of it…”
General George Washington

War of 1812 (1812-15)
“In short, a Quartermaster General should anticipate every thing, see every thing, and be prepared at all times as far as human foresight is capable of for all emergencies.”
Major General Henry Dearborn, Commander of the Northern Department

Quartermasters in East Tennessee work to open a desperately needed supply route, the so-called “Cracker Line” for thousands of besieged Union Army troops at Chattanooga. On 30 Oct 1863, Quartermaster Colonel William G. LeDuc and Captain Arthur Edwards, launched a homemade steamboat, CHATTANOOGA on her maiden voyage from Bridgeport, Alabama to a landing spot near Chattanooga called Kelley’s Ferry, breaking the siege. More vessels followed in the weeks and months ahead, including one carrying General William T. Sherman as he made ready for his march through Georgia.

The Department engaged in routine supply operations of remote garrisons in the West, recovery and burial of the Civil War dead, disaster assistance to civilian communities, and supply to various expeditions. It was responsible for the payment of claims from civilian firms for items furnished to the Army during the Civil War. The last claim was not settled until 1889, 23 years after the end of the war. The Department also turned it’s attention to improving the living conditions of the soldier. It constructed new barracks, hospitals, store houses and mess halls.


Origins at the Arsenal

At the beginning of the 19th century, the federal and state governments of the revolutionary era were leaving Philadelphia and the city was transitioning to one of the first U.S. industrial centers. The Quartermaster of today has its origins around this time with the Army&rsquos construction of the Schuylkill Arsenal at Grays Ferry Avenue and Washington Avenue (yes, you can still see its stone wall there today) to warehouse military arms, gun powder, clothing and equipment. It was the third federal facility in the young nation.

In 1803 Captain Meriwether Lewis provisioned an unprecedented journey out of the Schuylkill Arsenal &ndash one that would set his place in history as one of America&rsquos most famed pioneers. The Lewis and Clark Expedition (1804-1806) set out across the Grays Ferry Bridge in Conestoga wagons with 3,500 pounds of supplies loaded and became the first expedition to cross the western portion of the United States. Reaching the Pacific, the team had mapped and established their presence for America&rsquos legal claim to the land - and defined the course of our country&rsquos westward expansion.

By 1818, the Schuylkill Arsenal&rsquos responsibilities had shifted to a specialization in textiles, performing tasks like garment cutting and tent inspection, as well as the acquisition, storage and distribution of military clothing, footwear and personal equipment.

During the Civil War (1861-1865), more than 10,000 seamstresses and tailors were brought on to make the clothing, blankets, tents and bedding needed for Union troops.

By the 1880s, immigration from Russia, Eastern Europe, and Italy started rivaling immigration from Western Europe in Philadelphia. Philadelphia's Italian population grew from around 300 in 1870 to around 18,000 in 1900, with the majority settling in South Philadelphia.

The first two decades of the 1900s saw the development of 480 homes that make up the distinct neighboring community of Girard Estates &ndash its eclectic mix of architectural styles pose a marked difference from the Philly row and the close-knit community housed many within the Quartermaster workforce.


Quartermaster

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Quartermaster, officer who superintends arrangements for the quartering and movement of troops. In Europe the office dates back at least to the 15th century. During the late 17th century, when the minister of war of King Louis XIV of France reorganized the army, he created a quartermaster general’s department that dotted the countryside with strategically located and defended magazines of food, forage, ammunition, and equipment. By the 18th century in some continental countries, the duties of the quartermaster had expanded to incorporate many attributes of a modern chief of staff, such as directing and coordinating marches and deployments and drafting operational orders.

In Great Britain and the United States, by contrast, the quartermaster remained a specialized administrative and logistical functionary. In the United States the quartermaster, usually a commissioned officer, was a member of the Quartermaster Corps until 1962, when it was absorbed by other agencies. In the British army the quartermaster general’s staff is a coordinating branch under the control of the General Staff.


Collection inventory

The United States Army Quartermaster Department (1775-present, reorganized and known from 1912 on as the Quartermaster Corps) is responsible for the transportation of supplies to the Army. During the Civil War, the Quartermaster Dept. supplied the Union Army with ordinance, horses, food, personnel and other necessities by railway, wagon and ironclad river boats. The Battle of Harper's Ferry centered around the capture of the Union supply camp in September 1862 by the Confederate Army (led by Maj. General Thomas J. "Stonewall" Jackson). Harper's Ferry was later retaken by the Union army.

Perley P. Pitkin served as chief depot quartermaster for the Union Army at Harper's Ferry after the battle, and at other supply stations later on such as Belle Plain and Brandy Station.

Scope and Contents of the Collection

The United States Army Quartermaster Records consists of requisition forms, lists of stores received, lists of requisitioned private and public property, from various supply posts under the command of P. P. Pitkin and others during the Civil War.

Arrangement of the Collection

The collection is arranged in chronological order.

Restrictions

Access Restrictions

The majority of our archival and manuscript collections are housed offsite and require advanced notice for retrieval. Researchers are encouraged to contact us in advance concerning the collection material they wish to access for their research.

Use Restrictions

Written permission must be obtained from SCRC and all relevant rights holders before publishing quotations, excerpts or images from any materials in this collection.

Subject Headings

Corporate Bodies

Places

Genres and Forms

Administrative Information

Preferred Citation

Preferred citation for this material is as follows:

United States Army Quartermaster Records,
Special Collections Research Center,
Syracuse University Libraries

Finding Aid Information

Created by: [Summit record]
Date: 12 Mar 2007
Revision history: 17 Mar 2009 - converted to EAD (AM)


Ford Richmond Assembly Plant

The history of the Quartermaster Corps goes back to 1775 and the appointment of a Quartermaster General by the Continental Congress during the Revolutionary War. Thereafter, the Quartermaster Corps' organization evolved during peacetime and wars as it sought to supply the U.S. Army's material needs. It was generally responsible for procurement, storage, and transportation of supplies. It was always responsible for food, clothing, and camp equipment, and during some early periods, it was also responsible for arms and ammunition. By the end the 1930s, when much of the rest of the world had gone to war, the Quartermaster Corps had an extensive infrastructure of supply depots throughout the nation. It also had the facilities for making certain items itself, such as the uniform factory at the Corps' Philadelphia Depot. In 1939, the Corps was staffed by about 12,000 military personnel and 37,000 civilian employees, who supplied a standing army of about 200,000.

With the fall of France in 1940, Congress authorized the U.S. Army to expand to 1,400,000. More than the Ordnance Department, however, the Quartermaster Corps was prepared to supply an expanded army on short notice. The increase in staffing and procurement by the Quartermaster Corps in the early 1940s, although marked, was not as dramatic as that of the Ordnance Department, and the effort to mobilize American industry to satisfy Quartermaster needs was not so remarkable. Because of the nature of the items needed by the Quartermaster Corps, in fact, the nature of the mobilization was quite different. Whereas the Ordnance Department, for example, needed to help facilitate the expansion and conversion of heavy industry in industrialized parts of the country, often in the face of severe equipment and labor shortages, the Quartermaster Corps relied on manufacturers and suppliers who could fairly easily make the transition to production in support of the military. The Navy and the Maritime Commission needed to focus their expansion of shipbuilding on coastal areas, whereas the Quartermaster Corps could make procurements anywhere in the interior of the country. Therefore, to help relieve the stresses placed on coastal and industrialized areas by war production, the Quartermaster Corps preferentially awarded contracts, when possible, to small manufacturers operating in parts of the country that still had labor surpluses. At the end of the war, the Quartermaster Corps had 500,000 military personnel and 75,000 civilian employees.

Until 1942, as previously mentioned, the Quartermaster Corps was the organization within the U.S. Army that was responsible for providing motorized transportation. The army had purchased its first motor vehicle, an Oldsmobile passenger car, in 1903. Four years later it bought a truck. Yet the Quartermaster General was not immediately impressed with those trial vehicles:
"Tests made of automobiles for military purposes and reports received as to their utility and cost of maintenance do not argue in favor of their substitution for any of the standard means of Army transportation. These vehicles can rapidly transport persons and supplies over city streets or well-kept roads, but at the very best the cost of such transportation for army work is excessive. The high initial cost of these machines, the liability of damage to their complicated mechanism, tires, etc., with consequent disabling of the cars and frequency with which breakage or disabling accidents occur, together with the great expense of repairs, high wages of the necessary skilled chauffeurs, and their impracticability of operation over any but the best of roads and the smoothest of terrain will, it is thought, prohibit use of the existing types as a substitute for any of the present means of army transportation."

The Quartermaster General's remarks indicated, however, a recognition that the capabilities of motor vehicles could change, as indeed they did, while the Quartermaster Corps continued to purchase cars and trucks and the army sought ways to integrate them into its operations. By 1911, the army was using commercial trucks to move supplies at several of its posts, and that year the Quartermaster General put Capt. A.E. Williams in charge of two important new programs. One was to develop a truck capable of working with troops, thereby replacing horse- and mule-drawn wagons. The other was to work with manufacturers in an effort to have them make standardized trucks for the army. Given the nascent character of the automobile industry, Williams had little success in the latter program. Undaunted, he continued to have army units use various truck models in experimental field maneuvers to try to find appropriate rolls for motor vehicles. By 1913, the Quartermaster Corps was ready to issue general specifications that manufacturers had to meet in supplying the army with trucks, and in 1915, some units of the Quartermaster Corps began to organize motor truck companies, motor car companies, and motor cycle companies.

With the U.S. entry into World War I, army purchases of motor vehicles increased tremendously, so the army decided to establish a new Motor Transport Corps. After the war, the army abolished the Motor Transport Corps and returned responsibility for motor vehicles to the Quartermaster Corps. Camp Holabird became the Quartermaster Corps' central spare parts depot for army cars and trucks and also housed the Quartermaster Transport School to train mechanics for keeping the army's fleet of vehicles in repair. Because of the huge surplus of vehicles left by the war, however, the Quartermaster Corps made few purchases during the 1920s. By the 1930s, most of the army's vehicles were obsolete. The army decided to eliminate horses and mules and to completely motorize its units, and the army also soon had responsibility to purchase trucks for the Civilian Conservation Corps. Limited testing for new kinds of trucks to meet those needs took place at Holabird.

Therefore, the Quartermaster Corps greatly expanded its purchasing program for motor vehicles, but not without a skirmish over the issue of standardization with the Ordnance Department, which held responsibility for purchase of combat vehicles. The Quartermaster General believed that standardization of transport vehicles throughout the army was essential to ensure effective maintenance in the field during wartime. The Chief of Ordnance advocated allowing each organization of the army to determine specifications for trucks it needed. The Quartermaster General prevailed initially, and in 1931 the army embarked on the purchase of a standardized fleet. Ordnance and the Corps of Engineers continued to resist the policy, and some manufacturers also balked at responding to bid requests, citing the new standardized specifications. The army's Comptroller General ruled in 1933 that the Quartermaster Corps' standardized specifications violated the War Department's procurement regulations, so truck manufacturers were allowed to submit competitive bids on vehicles, responding only to general specifications. By 1936, when the old fleet of vehicles had been largely replaced. Col. Brainerd Taylor, the commander at Holabird, reported to the Quartermaster General that the army owned and operated 360 distinct models of vehicles. Holabird could not maintain so many different types of spare parts, so the Quartermaster Corps' centralized system for spare parts at Holabird disintegrated.

Some truck manufacturers recognized the peril this situation placed upon the U.S. Army. The previous year, the Motor Transport Branch of the Quartermaster Corps convened a meeting with the Assistant Secretary of War, the Quartermaster General, several of his top assistants, and representatives of forty truck manufacturers. Several companies, including the White Motor Company, Moreland Truck Company, and the Marmon Herrington Motor Truck Company, agreed with the Quartermaster General's position that the army needed standardized trucks, but they were also cognizant of the pitfalls, articulated by a representative of the Four Wheel Drive Auto Company. He recognized that if the army conducted tests on a particular patented device and then decided to incorporate it in its standard specifications, competitors of the company that owned the patent would try to use political connections to have the specifications changed to remove the patented device. Nevertheless, some means of overcoming that competitive barrier had to be found for, as A.W. Herrington of Marmon Herrington observed,
"if the kind of motor transport recently purchased for the Army were used [in the next war], it would be necessary to abandon any thought of automotive repair in the field and to adopt a policy of abandoning unserviceable vehicles and replacing them with new vehicles.''

Colonel Taylor was in complete agreement with Herrington, telling the Quartermaster General that simplifying automotive repair was "one of the most important problems in modem war planning." Taylor continued to press his superiors in the hierarchy of the War Department on the need for standardization, and in 1938 Assistant Secretary of War Louis Johnson took up his cause. Over the next two years, Congress, at Johnson's urging, made important progress toward authorizing the army to purchase standardized trucks. Germany's invasion of Poland in September 1939 helped to stimulate that progress. By mid-1940, many components in a system of standardization were in place, leading the army to accept a couple of kinds of trucks that were to become well-known during America's participation in World War II: the Dodge 4x4 1-1/2-ton truck and the General Motors 6x6 2-1/2-ton truck. The Quartermaster Corps made all- wheel drive the norm and established five standard chassis types for 1/2-ton, 1-1/2-ton, 2-1/2-ton, 4-ton, and 7-1/2-ton trucks. There would be certain variation in body types to accommodate particular uses, but all would be designed to minimize variability in spare parts. In order not to discourage bidders, however, higher authorities in the War Department still allowed some minor variations in the trucks bidders could propose to build. Against this background, the determination of the Quartermaster Corps to insist that the jeep be completely standardized can be better understood.


Quartermaster Corps

The Quartermaster Corps arranges for or provide supplies materiel management, distribution, procurement and field services to support and sustain soldiers, units and their equipage in peace and war. The Quartermaster Corps also handles and manages individual and organizational clothing and equipment, field services including laundry and clothing exchange, fabric repair, graves registration, parachute packing, maintenance, and aerial delivery of supplies and equipment.

Of the 118,625 soldiers in Quartermaster units in the year 2000, 73,733 of these or 62 percent are in the Reserve Component. The US Army Reserve (USAR) represents 24 percent of the Quartermaster Corps - with 28,863 USAR soldiers. The Army National Guard (ARNG) represents 38 per cent of the Corps - with 44,870 ARNG Quartermasters.

Quartermaster Corps missions have undergone enormous growth and numerous changes over the years, as supply and service functions were added or reassigned.

The tradition of the Quartermaster Corps dates back to 1775 when the Second Continental Congress passed a resolution creating the Quartermaster General's Department and appointed Thomas Mifflin as the first Quartermaster General. Quartermaster duties of the Revolutionary War included transport and supply of nearly all goods and services required by the Army and Navy. Supplies were scarce and were obtained by a variety of methods, including house-to-house canvassing. Inadequate transportation, financial problems, and other problems plagued supply personnel, but ever resourceful and courageous, they were able to overcome these problems.

The Quartermaster Corps traces its origins to June 16, 1775. On that day, following General George Washington's address accepting command of the Army, the Second Continental Congress passed a resolution providing for "one Quartermaster General of the grand army and a deputy, under him, for the separate army." Major General Thomas Mifflin, the first Quartermaster General, had virtually no money and authority and was dependent upon the several states for supplies.

The first Quartermaster General, General Thomas Mifflin, told Congress in 1776 that to perform his mission he would need: "200 wagons with four horses each, 50 ox teams with two oxen each and 50 drays with, one horse each, besides 100 strong horses for the artillery, and 50 for expresses and commissary." In 1778, Congress adopted General Mifflin's plan for reorganization of the Quartermaster Department and included "a commissary of forage" and "a commissary for horses and wagons" as two of the major officials.

Major General Nathanael Greene, the third Quartermaster General, reorganized the supply system after Valley Forge, establishing the first depot system to support the Army. While his fame as a battle leader is well known, General Greene's outstanding service as the Quartermaster General during the darkest period of the American Revolution has been almost forgotten.

In 1812, the Quartermaster General was directed to provide means of transport for the Army and its stores. From 1818 to 1860, the Quartermaster General was Brigadier General Thomas Sidney Jesup, a daring leader and able administrator who did much to enhance the Corps' reputation. During his 42-year tenure as head of the Quartermaster Department, he instituted an improved system of property accountability and experimented with new modes of transportation, including the use of canal boats in the east and camel caravans in the desert southwest, and worked some of the earliest railroads. Because many of his policies remained in effect well into the 20th Century, Jesup is traditionally regarded as the "Father of the Quartermaster Corps." The supply of clothing and other items was taken over by the Quartermaster Department in 1842.

In 1862, Quartermasters took over the duty of burying war dead and maintaining national cemeteries. Many glowing accounts have been written of the proficient services of the entire Quartermaster Department throughout the Civil War. During the Civil War, the Department under the leadership of Major General Montgomery C. Meigs supplied the Union Army of over half a million soldiers, ran the Army's first major depot system, and transported unprecedented levels of supplies and personnel throughout the war. Also, in 1862, the Quartermaster Department assumed responsibility for burial of war dead and care of national cemeteries.

In 1908, Congress authorized the Remount Service, which was to procure horses, condition them, provide initial training, and issue them to using units. Before that time, horses and mules for Army use had been purchased by the Quartermaster Department under contract after advertising for bids. This practice had been quite unsatisfactory in terms of getting a number of older horses, many in poor physical condition. The first remount depot was at Fort Reno, OK. The Front Royal, VA, Depot was opened in 1911.

In 1912, Congress consolidated the former Subsistence, Pay, and Quartermaster Departments in order to create the Quartermaster Corps much as we know it today - fully militarized with its own officers, soldiers and units trained to perform a host of supply and service functions on the battlefield. With this consolidation came the missions of subsistence and food service. When the Army began purchasing motorized vehicles as early as 1903, the Quartermaster Corps naturally assumed the new petroleum supply mission.

During World War I, the Quartermaster Department was responsible for the Motor Transport Corps. World War I showed the increased importance of logistics in the modern era and also witnessed the first use of specialized Quartermaster units on the Western Front. Several "logistics warriors" were also singled out for valor in the Great War and received the nation's highest honors for bravery. World War I was the last major conflict in which the United States Army used horses and mules in significant numbers. The Remount Service was enlarged to meet the increased demands of the Artillery, the Cavalry and other units. About 571,000 horses and mules processed through the Remount system, and more than 68,000 of those animals were killed in that war. At the close of the World War I, the Quartermaster Corps maintained 39 remount depots with a capacity of 229,200 animals.

When mobilization for World War II began in 1939, it was predicted that the Army would need 200,000 horses. In 1940, the Army had 2 horse cavalry divisions, 2 horse-drawn artillery regiments, and 2 mixed horse and motor transport regiments, with a total authorization of 16,800 horses and 3,500 mules. The need for horses continuously decreased as Active, Reserve and National Guard units converted to trucks and jeeps. These horses were returned to the remount depots. Only four horses were procured in the 1943 fiscal year and none from then on through the end of the war. Throughout the war period, only 49 horses were shipped from the United States to the armed forces overseas.

During World War II, the Quartermaster Corps trained thousands of soldiers to fill specialized roles in every theater of operation - from the Pacific Isles and the China-Burma-India theater to North Africa, Italy, and central and northern Europe. They performed heroically at such far-off places as Bataan, Iwo Jima, Leyete, Salerno, Anzio, Normandy and Bastogne. The RED BALL EXPRESS became famous with the massive amount of logistics conducted during World War II. At the height of the war, Quartermasters were providing over 70,000 different supply items and more than 24 million meals each day. When it was over, they had recovered and buried nearly a quarter of a million soldiers in temporary cemeteries around the world. In World War II, 4,943 Quartermaster soldiers lost their lives.

In 1950, the Quartermaster Corps moved swiftly to supply the United States military and their United Nations allies sent to defend South Korea from the Communist North. When the North Korean Communist Army invaded South Korea, the Quartermaster Corps made a successful, large-scale logistic effort under very unfavorable conditions. That same year the Corps assumed a new mission - supply by air that often proved crucial to the sustainment of troops on the Korean peninsula. From 1965 to 1973, the Quartermaster Crops was deeply involved in the massive logistical buildup required in Vietnam. The 1965 decision to commit major United States combat forces to the Republic of Vietnam led to a massive logistics buildup. Quartermaster Corps personnel were deeply involved in meeting this challenge. They could be found operating in every area of Vietnam, furnishing vital supplies and services often under the most adverse and dangerous conditions.

In 1983, the Quartermaster Corps supported the fight for the island of Grenada. In 1989, during Operation Just Cause, Panama, soldiers of the Quartermaster Corps supplied and supported the victory. During Operation Desert Storm the Quartermaster Corps successfully accomplished the most complex logistical effort in military history to ensure soldiers were equipped and supplied throughout the conflict.

  • Class I- Food, rations, and water
  • Class II- Clothing
  • Class III- Petroleum, oils, and lubricants
  • Class IV- Fortification and barrier materials
  • Class V- Ammunition
  • Class VI Personal Items
  • Class VII- Major End Items
  • Class VIII- Medical supplies, minimal amounts
  • Class IX- Repair Parts
  • Class X- Miscellaneous supplies

Officers accessed into the Quartermaster Corps are designated 92A- Quartermaster General. The Quartermaster Corps requires training to perform duties in a wide range of logistical areas. To prepare to meet the challenge of duty, officers attend the Quartermaster Officer Basic Course at the U.S. Army Quartermaster Center and School, Fort Lee, Virginia. The course provides training in general military subjects-leadership, military justice, weapons and tactics- and an introduction to the general functions of logistics. There is also will receive instruction in all of the Quartermaster areas of concentration, providing sufficient background to become a Quartermaster generalists, capable of filling any Quartermaster Lieutenant position (except aerial delivery positions). Some officers receive additional training in Aerial Delivery and Materiel and are, by regulation, the only officers who may fill parachute rigger positions. These officers, however, also retain their 92A qualification and be eligible for assignment to such a position.

Upon promotion to or selection for captain, officers attend the Combined Logistics Officer Advanced Course (CLOAC) in order to prepare for Branch qualification. The CLOAC prepares officers to serve as company commanders and supply and service staff officers for multifunctional logistical organizations. During CLOAC, officers receive both advanced tactical and technical training as well as instruction in advanced materiel management and multifunctional logistics. After completing CLOAC officers are awarded Area of Concentration 92B, Supply and Materiel Management. Following CLOAC, some officers attend follow-on modules tied to their projected assignment. Others attend specialized courses relating to various Quartermaster Areas of Concentration such as the Aerial Delivery and Materiel Officer Course (92D), Advanced Fuels/Water Management (92F), or Advanced Subsistence Management (92G). Officers are required to complete the Combined Arms and Services School (CAS3) prior to their 10th year of service. After promotion to captain, officers must aggressively seek company command to enhance professional development and complement this with staff experience at the battalion, brigade, or division level.


Watch the video: United States Army Quartermaster Corps 2019


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