January 8, 2015 Day 353 of the Sixth Year - History

January 8, 2015 Day 353 of the Sixth Year - History


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President Barack Obama meets with former Rep. Gabby Giffords and her husband, Mark Kelly, on the fourth anniversary of the shooting that left Giffords gravely wounded, in Phoenix, Ariz., Jan. 8, 2015.

10:45AM THE PRESIDENT delivers remarks
Central High School, Phoenix, Arizona

11:25AM THE PRESIDENT departs Arizona
Phoenix Sky Harbor International Airport, Phoenix, Arizona

EST

4:30PM In-Town Travel Pool Call Time

5:35PM THE PRESIDENT arrives Joint Base Andrews

5:50PM THE PRESIDENT arrives the White House
South Lawn


Ichiro Suzuki

Ichiro Suzuki / ˈ iː tʃ ɪ r oʊ s uː ˈ z uː k i / ( 鈴木 一朗 , Suzuki Ichirō, born 22 October 1973) , also known mononymously as Ichiro ( イチロー , Ichirō) , is a Japanese former professional baseball outfielder who played 28 seasons combined in top-level professional leagues. He spent the bulk of his career with two teams: nine seasons with the Orix BlueWave of Nippon Professional Baseball (NPB) in Japan, where he began his career, and 14 with the Seattle Mariners of Major League Baseball (MLB) in the United States. After playing the first 12 years of his MLB career for the Mariners, Suzuki played two and a half seasons with the New York Yankees before signing with the Miami Marlins. He played three seasons with the Marlins before returning to the Mariners in 2018.

    (1992–2000) (2001–2012) (2012–2014) (2015–2017) (2018–2019)
  • 7× All-Star (1994–2000) champion (1996)
  • 3× Pacific League MVP (1994–1996)
  • 7× Golden Glove Award (1994–2000)
  • 7× Best Nine Award (1994–2000)
  • 2× Matsutaro Shoriki Award (1994, 1995)
  • 7× Pacific League batting champion (1994–2000)
  • Pacific League RBI leader (1995)
  • Pacific League stolen base leader (1995)
  • 10× All-Star (2001–2010) (2001) (2001)
  • 10× Gold Glove Award (2001–2010)
  • 3× Silver Slugger Award (2001, 2007, 2009)
  • 2× AL batting champion (2001, 2004) (2001)
  • MLB record 262 hits, single season
Men's baseball
Representing Japan
World Baseball Classic
2006 San Diego Team
2009 Los Angeles Team

Suzuki established a number of batting records, including MLB's single-season record for hits with 262. He achieved 10 consecutive 200-hit seasons, the longest streak by any player in history. Between his major league career in both Japan and the United States, Suzuki has the most hits by any player in top-tier professional leagues. [ citation needed ] He also has recorded the most hits of all Japanese-born players in MLB history.

In his combined playing time in the NPB and MLB, Suzuki received 17 consecutive selections both as an All-Star and Gold Glove winner, won nine league batting titles, and was named most valuable player (MVP) four times. In the NPB, he won seven consecutive batting titles and three consecutive Pacific League MVP Awards. In 2001, Suzuki became the first Japanese-born position player to be posted and signed to an MLB club. [1] He led the American League (AL) in batting average and stolen bases en route to being named AL Rookie of the Year and AL MVP.

Suzuki was the first MLB player to enter the Japanese Baseball Hall of Fame (The Golden Players Club). He was a ten-time MLB All-Star and won the 2007 All-Star Game MVP Award for a three-hit performance that included the event's first-ever inside-the-park home run. Suzuki won a Rawlings Gold Glove Award in each of his first 10 years in the majors and had an American League–record seven hitting streaks of 20 or more games, with a high of 27. He is also noted for his longevity, continuing to produce at a high level with batting, slugging, and on-base percentages above .300 in 2016, while approaching 43 years of age. In 2016, Suzuki notched the 3,000th hit of his MLB career, against Chris Rusin of the Colorado Rockies at Coors Field, becoming only the 30th player ever to do so. In total, he finished with 4,367 hits in his professional career across Japan and the United States.


Contents

Starting with this series, the four-year cycle of Ashes series in England is being brought forward by two years. Similarly, series in Australia were brought forward one year beginning with the 2013–14 series. This rescheduling was to avoid a clash with the 2015 World Cup, which was hosted by Australia and New Zealand, and future World Cup preparations. England last hosted the Ashes in 2013. [3] However, this rescheduling would cause England to host an Ashes series in 2019 immediately after the 2019 World Cup in England, resulting in a possible hindrance to Australia's Ashes preparations, despite the 2013–14 series being held a year earlier than scheduled to avoid the same outcome with the World Cup. [3] The rescheduling has been criticised in some quarters as owing to greed and commercialism. [4] [5] The ECB have also commented that having three Ashes series in two years will also prevent any future Ashes series held in Australia from affecting World Cup preparations. [6]

On 31 March 2015, Australia announced a 17-man touring party for the Ashes series. [7] England announced their squad for the first Test on 1 July. [8] Australia fast-bowler Ryan Harris announced his retirement from cricket days before the start of the series, due to an ongoing knee injury. He was subsequently replaced by New South Wales fast bowler Pat Cummins. [9]

1 Cummins replaced Ryan Harris, who retired prior to the start of the series due to a knee injury. [9]
2 Bairstow replaced Gary Ballance in the squad from the third Test onwards. [10]
3 Plunkett and Footitt replaced James Anderson in the squad for the fourth Test due to Anderson suffering an injury. [11] Anderson returned to the squad in place of Footitt for the fifth Test. [12]

First Test Edit

Having been asked to field first by England, despite the start being delayed by a prolonged opening ceremony, the Australians made an early breakthrough with the wicket of Adam Lyth (6). The arrival of Gary Ballance saw a mini-partnership develop between him and captain Alastair Cook, before Cook (20) edged a ball from spinner Nathan Lyon to wicket-keeper Brad Haddin, followed almost immediately by Ian Bell (1), trapped LBW by Mitchell Starc. That brought Joe Root to the crease to join his Yorkshire teammate Ballance. In what was undoubtedly the turning point in the match, Haddin dropped a fairly regulation catch from the bowling of Starc on Root's second delivery. The dismissal would have reduced England to 43/4 after they chose to bat first, but after the let off the pair raced to their respective fifties, putting on 153 runs for the fourth wicket before Ballance was trapped LBW by Josh Hazlewood for 61. Root and Ben Stokes then shared a fifth-wicket stand of 84 before Root was caught out by Shane Watson off Starc for a total of 134, having rescued England from 43/3 to 280/5. Stokes completed his half-century before he was bowled by Starc for 52, and Jos Buttler was also out for 27 after a seventh-wicket stand of exactly 50 with Moeen Ali, but England managed to see out the day on 343/7. [13]

Having been 26 not out overnight, Moeen Ali added another 51 runs on the morning of the second day before he was caught out by Watson off Starc. Stuart Broad's 18 was the only significant contribution to the England total among the tail, and Starc completed a five-wicket haul when he bowled James Anderson to end the England innings on 430. Australia made a steady start to their response, putting on 52 runs before David Warner was caught by Cook in the slips for 17. Next to go for Australia was Steve Smith, recently ranked as the best Test batsman in the world, [14] caught at short mid-on by Cook off the bowling of Moeen Ali for 33. Meanwhile, Chris Rogers reached 95 before edging a ball from Mark Wood through to Buttler to become the first player to record seven consecutive Test fifties without converting one to a century it was also Wood's maiden Ashes wicket. A second wicket for Moeen Ali soon followed, as he caught Australia captain Michael Clarke off his own bowling. A 50-run partnership between Adam Voges and Shane Watson for the fifth wicket was ended shortly before the end of the day, with Voges caught by Anderson off Stokes for 31, leaving Australia on 264/5 at the close of play. [15]

The third morning started with two quick wickets, with Watson and nightwatchman Lyon departing for the addition of just one run. A flurry of runs from Haddin and Mitchell Johnson saw Australia pass 300, but the last two wickets fell for just four runs, and Australia were all out for 308, still 122 runs behind England. As England began their second innings, the Australians again made early breakthroughs, with Cook out for 12 and Ballance out for a duck, before Lyth and Bell shared a stand of 51 runs for the third wicket. The partnership was broken when Clarke made a one-handed catch to dismiss Lyth for 37, but Bell batted on to reach his first Test half-century in 10 innings. He and Root put on 97 for the fourth wicket before Bell was out for 60, bowled by Johnson for the Australian's first wicket of the match, following first-innings figures of 0/111. Root followed 11 overs later for exactly the same score off exactly the same number of balls, and dismissed in exactly the same manner by Hazlewood. Stokes then made a useful 42, but after the dismissal of Buttler (7), there was a clatter of wickets, reducing England from 236/5 to 245/8 in less than three overs. Wood hit a quickfire 32 not out off 18 balls to push England towards 300, but they were eventually bowled out for 289, a lead of 411. With rain forecast for the fifth day, England knew that they would have to bowl Australia out on day 4 to ensure victory. [16]

With Australia chasing 412 to win, they lost Rogers for 10 early on, ending his record-equalling run of half-centuries, but a 78-run partnership between Warner and Smith looked to have stabilised the innings. The stand was broken by Moeen Ali in the final over before lunch, trapping Warner LBW for 52. Australia then lost Smith (33), Clarke (4) and Voges (1) in the five overs following the interval in the space of six overs, they had fallen from 97/1 to 106/5. Haddin was next to go, caught at short midwicket by Cook for 7 the England captain parried the ball up at the first attempt, but retained his focus to cling on at the second time of asking. Watson (19) did his best to reignite the innings before being trapped LBW for the second time in the match, reducing Australia to 151/7. Johnson and Starc then shared a 72-run partnership for the eighth wicket, only for Root's off spin to find both their edges to leave the tourists 169 behind with one wicket in hand. Root was again involved in the final wicket, as Moeen Ali tempted Hazlewood into a big shot down the ground to long on, where Root was waiting to take the catch and seal victory. For his contributions primarily with the bat, but also with the ball, Root was named Man of the Match. [17]


Principles of the religious calendar

Religious holidays are determined by a lunisolar calendar that is based on calculations of the actual postions of the Sun and Moon. Most holidays occur on specified lunar dates (tithis), as is explained later a few occur on specified solar dates. The calendrical methods presented here are those recommended by the Calendar Reform Committee (1957). They serve as the basis for the calendar published in The Indian Astronomical Ephemeris. However, many local calendar makers continue to use traditional astronomical concepts and formulas, some of which date back 1500 years.

The Calendar Reform Committee attempted to reconcile traditional calendrical practices with modern astronomical concepts. According to their proposals, precession is accounted for and calculations of solar and lunar position are based on accurate modern methods. All astronomical calculations are performed with respect to a Central Station at longitude 82°30’ East, latitude 23°11’ North. For religious purposes solar days are reckoned from sunrise to sunrise.

A solar month is defined as the interval required for the Sun’s apparent longitude to increase by 30o, corresponding to the passage of the Sun through a zodiacal sign (rasi). The initial month of the year, Vaisakha, begins when the true longitude of the Sun is 23° 15’ (see table below). Because the Earth’s orbit is elliptical, the lengths of the months vary from 29.2 to 31.2 days. The short months all occur in the second half of the year around the time of the Earth’s perihelion passage.

Solar Months of the Indian Religious CalendarSun’s Longitude deg minApprox. Duration dApprox. Greg. Date
1. Vaisakha23 1530.9Apr. 13
2. Jyestha53 1531.3May 14
3. Asadha83 1531.5June 14
4. Sravana113 1531.4July 16
5. Bhadrapada143 1531.0Aug. 16
6. Asvina173 1530.5Sept. 16
7. Kartika203 1530.0Oct. 17
8. Margasirsa233 1529.6Nov. 16
9. Pausa263 1529.4Dec. 15
10. Magha293 1529.5Jan. 14
11. Phalgura323 1529.9Feb. 12
12. Caitra353 1530.3Mar. 14

Desert Festival. Jaisalmer, Rajasthan, India

Camels and riders of the Indian Border Security Force perform a riding exhibition in front of Jaisalmer Fort. Each year, during the full moon in the month of Kartika, Rajputs lead their camels to Pushkar for the annual camel fair.

Owners paint and accessorize their camels for the annual Pushkar Fair in Rajasthan, India.

At right, Rajputs are leading a camel herd to Pushkar, India. Each year during Kartik Purnima, which is the full moon in the Indian calendar month of Kartika, thousands of Rajputs lead their camels across the desert to the town of Pushkar for the annual camel fair. They come to sell, buy, and trade animals.

Lunar months are measures from one New Moon to the next (although some groups reckon from the Full Moon). Each lunar month is given the name of the solar month in which the lunar month begins. Because most lunations are shorter than a solar month, there is occasionally a solar month in which two New Moons occur. In this case, both lunar months bear the same name, but the first month is described with the prefix adhika, or intercalary. Such a year has thirteen lunar months. Adhika months occur every two or three years following patterns described by the Metonic cycle or more complex lunar phase cycles.

More rarely, a year will occur in which a short solar month will pass without having a New Moon. In that case, the name of the solar month does not occur in the calendar for that year. Such a decayed (ksaya) month can occur only in the months near the Earth’s perihelion passage. In compensation, a month in the first half of the year will have had two New Moons, so the year will still have twelve lunar months. Ksaya months are separated by as few as nineteen years and as many as 141 years.

Lunations are divided into 30 tithis, or lunar days. Each tithi is defined by the time required for the longitude of the Moon to increase by 12o over the longitude of the Sun. Thus the length of a tithi may vary from about 20 hours to nearly 27 hours. During the waxing phases, tithis are counted from 1 to 15 with the designation Sukla. Tithis for the waning phases are designated Krsna and are again counted from 1 to 15. Each day is assigned the number of the tithi in effect at sunrise. Occasionally a short tithi will begin after sunrise and be completed before the next sunrise. Similarly a long tithi may span two sunrises. In the former case, a number is omitted from the day count. In the latter, a day number is carried over to a second day.


Browser Statistics

From the statistics below (collected since 2002) you can read the long term trends of browser usage.

Click on the browser names to see detailed browser information:

2021 Chrome Edge Firefox Safari Opera
April 80.7 % 5.6 % 6.1 % 3.7 % 2.4 %
March 80.8 % 5.5 % 6.3 % 3.7 % 2.3 %
February 80.6 % 5.4 % 6.6 % 3.9 % 2.3 %
January 80.3 % 5.3 % 6.7 % 3.8 % 2.3 %
2020 Chrome Edge/IE Firefox Safari Opera
December 80.5 % 5.2 % 6.7 % 3.7 % 2.3 %
November 80.0 % 5.3 % 7.1 % 3.9 % 2.3 %
October 80.4 % 5.2 % 7.1 % 3.7 % 2.1 %
September 81.0 % 4.9 % 7.2 % 3.6 % 2.0 %
August 81.2 % 4.6 % 7.3 % 3.4 % 2.0 %
July 81.3 % 4.3 % 7.6 % 3.4 % 2.0 %
June 80.7 % 3.9 % 8.1 % 3.7 % 2.1 %
May 80.7 % 3.5 % 8.5 % 4.1 % 1.6 %
April 80.7 % 3.4 % 8.6 % 4.2 % 1.5 %
March 81.4 % 3.5 % 8.7 % 3.7 % 1.3 %
February 82.0 % 3.4 % 8.7 % 3.4 % 1.2 %
January 81.9 % 3.0 % 9.1 % 3.3 % 1.3 %
2019 Chrome Edge/IE Firefox Safari Opera
November 81.3 % 3.2 % 9.2 % 3.5 % 1.4 %
September 81.4 % 3.3 % 9.1 % 3.1 % 1.6 %
July 80.9 % 3.3 % 9.3 % 2.7 % 1.6 %
May 80.4 % 3.6 % 9.5 % 3.3 % 1.7 %
March 80.0 % 3.8 % 9.6 % 3.3 % 1.7 %
January 79.5 % 4.0 % 10.2 % 3.3 % 1.6 %
2018 Chrome IE/Edge Firefox Safari Opera
November 79.1 % 4.1 % 10.2 % 3.8 % 1.6 %
September 79.6 % 3.9 % 10.3 % 3.3 % 1.5 %
July 80.1 % 3.5 % 10.8 % 2.7 % 1.5 %
May 79.0 % 3.9 % 10.9 % 3.2 % 1.6 %
March 78.1 % 4.0 % 11.5 % 3.3 % 1.6 %
January 77.2 % 4.1 % 12.4 % 3.2 % 1.6 %
2017 Chrome IE/Edge Firefox Safari Opera
November 76.8 % 4.3 % 12.5 % 3.3 % 1.6 %
September 76.5 % 4.2 % 12.8 % 3.2 % 1.2 %
July 76.7 % 4.2 % 13.3 % 3.0 % 1.2 %
May 75.8 % 4.6 % 13.6 % 3.4 % 1.1 %
March 75.1 % 4.8 % 14.1 % 3.6 % 1.0 %
January 73.7 % 4.9 % 15.4 % 3.6 % 1.0 %
2016 Chrome IE/Edge Firefox Safari Opera
November 73.8 % 5.2 % 15.3 % 3.5 % 1.1 %
September 72.5 % 5.3 % 16.3 % 3.5 % 1.0 %
July 71.9 % 5.2 % 17.1 % 3.2 % 1.1 %
May 71.4 % 5.7 % 16.9 % 3.6 % 1.2 %
March 69.9 % 6.1 % 17.8 % 3.6 % 1.3 %
January 68.4 % 6.2 % 18.8 % 3.7 % 1.4 %
Year Chrome IE Firefox Safari Opera
2015 63.3 % 6.5 % 21.6 % 4.9 % 2.5 %
2014 59.8 % 8.5 % 24.9 % 3.5 % 1.7 %
2013 52.8 % 11.8 % 28.9 % 3.6 % 1.6 %
2012 42.9 % 16.3 % 33.7 % 3.9 % 2.1 %
2011 29.4 % 22.0 % 42.0 % 3.6 % 2.4 %
2010 16.7 % 30.4 % 46.4 % 3.4 % 2.3 %
2009 6.5 % 39.4 % 47.9 % 3.3 % 2.1 %
2008 52.4 % 42.6 % 2.5 % 1.9 %
2007 58.5 % 35.9 % 1.5 % 1.9 %
Netscape
2006 62.4 % 27.8 % 0.4 % 1.4 %
2005 73.8 % 22.4 % 0.5 % 1.2 %
Mozilla
2004 80.4 % 12.6 % 2.2 % 1.6 %
2003 87.2 % 5.7 % 2.7 % 1.7 %
2002 84.5 % 3.5 % 7.3 %
  • Chrome = Google Chrome
  • Edge = Microsoft Edge
  • IE = Microsoft Internet Explorer
  • Firefox = Mozilla Firefox (identified as Mozilla before 2005)
  • Mozilla = The Mozilla Suite (identified as Firefox after 2004)
  • Safari = Apple Safari (and Konqueror. Both identified as Mozilla before 2007)
  • Opera = Opera (from 2011 Opera Mini is included here)
  • Netscape = Netscape Navigator (identified as Mozilla after 2006)

Past Research Reports

Learn about our research program and see the most recent reports.

The Common Sense Census: Media Use by Tweens and Teens, 2015
November 03, 2015
The Common Sense Census: Media Use by Tweens and Teens is a large-scale study that explores young people’s use of the full range of media.
Read the full report

Children, Teens, Media, and Body Image
January 21, 2015
Our review of dozens of research studies on body image reveals its importance to kids' healthy development and the influential power of media -- and parents -- to shape attitudes and behaviors, beginning when kids are very young.
Read the full report

Children, Teens, and Reading
May 12, 2014
A review of national data and surveys on rates of reading and reading achievement over time among kids and teens.
Read the full report

Advertising to Children and Teens: Current Practices
January 28, 2014
This research brief reviews new techniques being used to market to kids and teens, scans what's known about current methods of advertising, and identifies gaps in research on the topic.
Read the full report

Zero to Eight: Children's Media Use in America, 2013
October 28, 2013
Second in a series of nationally representative surveys of parents of U.S. kids age 0 to 8 conducted to understand children's patterns of use for TV, reading, music, computers, video games, and mobile digital media.
Read the full report

Media and Violence: An Analysis of Current Research
February 13, 2013
This brief reviews the latest scientific research about violence in the media and its possible effects on aggressive behavior.
Read the full report

Children, Teens, and Entertainment Media: The View from the Classroom
November 1, 2012
A national survey of teachers about the role of entertainment media in students' academic and social development.
Read the full report

Social Media, Social Life: How Teens View Their Digital Lives, 2012
June 26, 2012
In this national survey, teens age 13 to 17 report on their use of texting and social media. They also report on how social media use affects the ways they feel about themselves and their relationships with family and friends.
Read the full report


This page lists announcements of security fixes made in Critical Patch Update Advisories, Security Alerts and Bulletins, and it is updated when new Critical Patch Update Advisories, Security Alerts and Bulletins are released.

This page contains the following sections:

Critical Patch Updates

Critical Patch Updates are collections of security fixes for Oracle products. They are available to customers with valid support contracts. They are released on the Tuesday closest to the 17th day of January, April, July and October. The next four dates are:

A pre-release announcement will be published on the Thursday preceding each Critical Patch Update release.

The Critical Patch Updates released since 2016 are listed in the following table. Critical Patch Updates released before 2016 are available here.

Critical Patch Update Latest Version/Date
Critical Patch Update - April 2021 Rev 4, 5 May 2021
Critical Patch Update - January 2021 Rev 3, 22 February 2021
Critical Patch Update - October 2020 Rev 6, 8 December 2020
Critical Patch Update - July 2020 Rev 8, 1 December 2020
Critical Patch Update - April 2020 Rev 11, 20 July 2020
Critical Patch Update - January 2020 Rev 7, 20 April 2020
Critical Patch Update - October 2019 Rev 3, 22 January 2020
Critical Patch Update - July 2019 Rev 6, 12 October 2020
Critical Patch Update - April 2019 Rev 6, 28 May 2019
Critical Patch Update - January 2019 Rev 7, 13 February 2020
Critical Patch Update - October 2018 Rev 6, 18 December 2018
Critical Patch Update - July 2018 Rev 8, 12 October 2018
Critical Patch Update - April 2018 Rev 4, 10 December 2018
Critical Patch Update - January 2018 Rev 8, 20 March 2018
Critical Patch Update - October 2017 Rev 10, 15 February 2018
Critical Patch Update - July 2017 Rev 6, 20 March 2018
Critical Patch Update - April 2017 Rev 5, 20 June 2017
Critical Patch Update - January 2017 Rev 5, 18 May 2017
Critical Patch Update - October 2016 Rev 5, 16 May 2019
Critical Patch Update - July 2016 Rev 2, 18 October 2016
Critical Patch Update - April 2016 Rev 3, 20 December 2016
Critical Patch Update - January 2016 Rev 2, 12 February 2016

Security Alerts

Oracle will issue Security Alerts for vulnerability fixes deemed too critical to wait for distribution in the next Critical Patch Update. The Security Alerts released since 2016 are listed in the following table. Security Alerts released before 2016 are available here.

Security Alert Number And Description Latest Version/Date
Alert for CVE-2020-14750 Rev 2, 06 November 2020
Alert for CVE-2019-2729 Rev 4, 11 July 2019
Alert for CVE-2019-2725 Rev 4, 29 May 2019
Alert for CVE-2018-11776 Rev 1, 31 August 2018
Alert for CVE-2018-3110 Rev 1, 10 August 2018
Alert for CVE-2017-10269 Rev 2, 16 November 2017
Alert for CVE-2017-10151 Rev 3, 04 November 2017
Alert for CVE-2017-9805 Rev 1, 22 September 2017
Alert for CVE-2017-3629 Rev 2, 20 June 2017
Alert for CVE-2016-0636 Rev 1, 23 March 2016
Alert for CVE-2016-0603 Rev 1, 05 February 2016

Solaris Third Party Bulletins

Solaris Third Party Bulletins are used to announce security patches for third party software distributed with Oracle Solaris. Solaris Third Party Bulletins are published on the same day as Oracle Critical Patch Updates are released. These bulletins are be updated on the Tuesday closest to the 17th of the following two months after their release (i.e., the two months between the normal quarterly Critical Patch Update publication dates). In addition, Solaris Third Party Bulletins may also be updated for vulnerability patches deemed too critical to wait for the next scheduled publication date. Bulletins published before January 20, 2015 are available here.

Solaris Third Party Bulletin Latest Version/Date
Solaris Third Party Bulletin - April 2021 Rev 3, 15 June 2021
Solaris Third Party Bulletin - January 2021 Rev 4, 16 March 2021
Solaris Third Party Bulletin - October 2020 Rev 4, 06 January 2021
Solaris Third Party Bulletin - July 2020 Rev 3, 15 September 2020
Solaris Third Party Bulletin - April 2020 Rev 3, 16 June 2020
Solaris Third Party Bulletin - January 2020 Rev 3, 16 March 2020
Solaris Third Party Bulletin - October 2019 Rev 3, 17 December 2019
Solaris Third Party Bulletin - July 2019 Rev 4, 03 October 2019
Solaris Third Party Bulletin - April 2019 Rev 3, 25 June 2019
Solaris Third Party Bulletin - January 2019 Rev 4, 16 April 2019
Solaris Third Party Bulletin - October 2018 Rev 3, 14 December 2018
Solaris Third Party Bulletin - July 2018 Rev 3, 24 September 2018
Solaris Third Party Bulletin - April 2018 Rev 3, 15 June 2018
Solaris Third Party Bulletin - January 2018 Rev 3, 20 March 2018
Solaris Third Party Bulletin - October 2017 Rev 3, 18 December 2017
Solaris Third Party Bulletin - July 2017 Rev 4, 18 September 2017
Solaris Third Party Bulletin - April 2017 Rev 4, 19 June 2017
Solaris Third Party Bulletin - January 2017 Rev 4, 28 March 2017
Solaris Third Party Bulletin - October 2016 Rev 5, 11 January 2017
Solaris Third Party Bulletin - July 2016 Rev 6, 10 April 2017
Solaris Third Party Bulletin - April 2016 Rev 8, 16 October 2017
Solaris Third Party Bulletin - January 2016 Rev 5, 12 April 2016
Solaris Third Party Bulletin - October 2015 Rev 5, 14 January 2016
Solaris Third Party Bulletin - July 2015 Rev 6, 15 September 2015
Solaris Third Party Bulletin - April 2015 Rev 3, 15 June 2015
Solaris Third Party Bulletin - January 2015 Rev 5, 01 April 2015

Oracle Linux Bulletins

Oracle releases security advisories for Oracle Linux as patches become available. Security advisories (ELSA) are published at https://linux.oracle.com/security/.

Starting October 20, 2015, Oracle will also publish Oracle Linux Bulletins which list all CVEs that had been resolved and announced in Oracle Linux Security Advisories in the last one month prior to the release of the bulletin. The Oracle Linux Bulletin will be published on the same day as Oracle Critical Patch Updates are released. These bulletins will also be updated for following two months after their release (i.e., the two months between the normal quarterly Critical Patch Update publication dates) to cover all CVEs that had been resolved in those two months following the bulletin's publication. In addition, Oracle Linux Bulletins may also be updated for vulnerability patches deemed too critical to wait for the next scheduled bulletin publication date.

Oracle Linux Bulletin Latest Version/Date
Oracle Linux Bulletin - April 2021 Rev 3, 17 June 2021
Oracle Linux Bulletin - January 2021 Rev 3, 19 March 2021
Oracle Linux Bulletin - October 2020 Rev 1, 20 October 2020
Oracle Linux Bulletin - July 2020 Rev 3, 21 September 2020
Oracle Linux Bulletin - April 2020 Rev 3, 15 June 2020
Oracle Linux Bulletin - January 2020 Rev 3, 17 March 2020
Oracle Linux Bulletin - October 2019 Rev 3, 18 December 2019
Oracle Linux Bulletin - July 2019 Rev 3, 19 September 2019
Oracle Linux Bulletin - April 2019 Rev 3, 18 June 2019
Oracle Linux Bulletin - January 2019 Rev 3, 18 March 2019
Oracle Linux Bulletin - October 2018 Rev 3, 17 December 2018
Oracle Linux Bulletin - July 2018 Rev 3, 18 September 2018
Oracle Linux Bulletin - April 2018 Rev 3, 18 June 2018
Oracle Linux Bulletin - January 2018 Rev 3, 16 March 2018
Oracle Linux Bulletin - October 2017 Rev 3, 18 December 2017
Oracle Linux Bulletin - July 2017 Rev 3, 18 September 2017
Oracle Linux Bulletin - April 2017 Rev 3, 19 June 2017
Oracle Linux Bulletin - January 2017 Rev 3, 17 March 2017
Oracle Linux Bulletin - October 2016 Rev 3, 19 December 2016
Oracle Linux Bulletin - July 2016 Rev 3, 19 September 2016
Oracle Linux Bulletin - April 2016 Rev 3, 20 June 2016
Oracle Linux Bulletin - January 2016 Rev 3, 21 March 2016
Oracle Linux Bulletin - October 2015 Rev 3, 21 December 2015

Oracle VM Server for x86 Bulletins

Oracle releases security advisories for Oracle VM Server for x86 as patches become available. Security advisories (OVMSA) are published at https://linux.oracle.com/errata/.

Starting July 19, 2016, Oracle will also publish Oracle VM Server for x86 Bulletins which will list all CVEs that had been resolved and announced in Oracle VM Server for x86 Security Advisories in the last one month prior to the release of the bulletin. The Oracle VM Server for x86 Bulletin will be published on the same day as Oracle Critical Patch Updates are released. These bulletins will also be updated for following two months after their release (i.e., the two months between the normal quarterly Critical Patch Update publication dates) to cover all CVEs that had been resolved in those two months following the bulletin's publication. In addition, Oracle VM Server for x86 Bulletins may also be updated for vulnerability patches deemed too critical to wait for the next scheduled bulletin publication date.

Oracle VM Server for x86 Bulletin Latest Version/Date
Oracle VM Server for x86 Bulletin - April 2021 Rev 1, 20 May 2021
Oracle VM Server for x86 Bulletin - January 2021 Rev 3, 19 March 2021
Oracle VM Server for x86 Bulletin - October 2020 Rev 1, 20 October 2020
Oracle VM Server for x86 Bulletin - July 2020 Rev 3, 21 September 2020
Oracle VM Server for x86 Bulletin - April 2020 Rev 3, 15 June 2020
Oracle VM Server for x86 Bulletin - January 2020 Rev 3, 17 March 2020
Oracle VM Server for x86 Bulletin - October 2019 Rev 2, 18 December 2019
Oracle VM Server for x86 Bulletin - July 2019 Rev 2, 16 August 2019
Oracle VM Server for x86 Bulletin - April 2019 Rev 3, 18 June 2019
Oracle VM Server for x86 Bulletin - January 2019 Rev 3, 18 March 2019
Oracle VM Server for x86 Bulletin - October 2018 Rev 3, 17 December 2018
Oracle VM Server for x86 Bulletin - July 2018 Rev 3, 18 September 2018
Oracle VM Server for x86 Bulletin - April 2018 Rev 3, 18 June 2018
Oracle VM Server for x86 Bulletin - January 2018 Rev 3, 16 March 2018
Oracle VM Server for x86 Bulletin - October 2017 Rev 3, 18 December 2017
Oracle VM Server for x86 Bulletin - July 2017 Rev 3, 18 September 2017
Oracle VM Server for x86 Bulletin - April 2017 Rev 3, 19 June 2017
Oracle VM Server for x86 Bulletin - January 2017 Rev 3, 17 March 2017
Oracle VM Server for x86 Bulletin - October 2016 Rev 3, 19 December 2016
Oracle VM Server for x86 Bulletin - July 2016 Rev 3, 19 September 2016

Map of CVE to Advisory/Alert

The Map of CVE to Advisory/Alert indicates which CVEs are fixed in each Critical Patch Update and Security Alert. The Map of CVE to Solaris Third Party Bulletin indicates which CVEs are fixed in each Solaris Third Party Bulletin.

Oracle CVEs not published in other Oracle public documents

The page provides a public mapping between CVEs and associated My Oracle Support (MOS) remediation documents which are accessible to any Oracle customer with a valid support license.

CVEs for Oracle open source projects not published in other Oracle public documents

The page lists CVEs for Oracle open source projects not published in other Oracle public documents.

Policy on information provided in Critical Patch Updates and Security Alerts

As a matter of policy, Oracle will not provide additional information about the specifics of vulnerabilities beyond what is provided in the Critical Patch Update or Security Alert notification, the pre-installation notes, the readme files, and FAQs. Oracle provides all customers with the same information in order to protect all customers equally. Oracle will not provide advance notification or "insider information" on Critical Patch Update or Security Alerts to individual customers. Finally, Oracle does not develop or distribute active exploit code (or "proof of concept code") for vulnerabilities in our products.

Applicability of Critical Patch Updates and Security Alerts to Oracle Cloud

The Oracle Cloud operations and security teams regularly evaluate Oracle&rsquos Critical Patch Updates and Security Alert fixes as well as relevant third-party fixes as they become available and apply the relevant patches in accordance with applicable change management processes.

Customers requiring additional information that is not addressed in the Critical Patch Update Advisory may obtain additional information as follows:


Mass shootings: There were 372 mass shootings in the US in 2015, killing 475 people and wounding 1,870, according to the Mass Shooting Tracker, which catalogues such incidents. A mass shooting is defined as a single shooting incident which kills or injures four or more people, including the assailant.

School shootings: There were 64 school shootings in 2015, according to a dedicated campaign group set up in the wake of the Sandy Hook elementary school massacre in Connecticut in 2012. Those figures include occasions when a gun was fired but no-one was hurt.

All shootings: Some 13,286 people were killed in the US by firearms in 2015, according to the Gun Violence Archive, and 26,819 people were injured [those figures exclude suicide]. Those figures are likely to rise by several hundred, once incidents in the final week of the year are counted.

How the US compares: The number of gun murders per capita in the US in 2012 - the most recent year for comparable statistics - was nearly 30 times that in the UK, at 2.9 per 100,000 compared with just 0.1.

Of all the murders in the US in 2012, 60% were by firearm compared with 31% in Canada, 18.2% in Australia, and just 10% in the UK.

The home front: So many people die annually from gunfire in the US that the death toll between 1968 and 2011 eclipses all wars ever fought by the country. According to research by Politifact, there were about 1.4 million firearm deaths in that period, compared with 1.2 million US deaths in every conflict from the War of Independence to Iraq.

Total number of guns: No official figure exists but there are thought to be about 300 million in the US, held by about a third of the population. That is nearly enough guns for every man, woman and child in the country.

The NRA: The right to own guns is regarded by many as enshrined in the Second Amendment to the US Constitution, and fiercely defended by lobby groups such as the National Rifle Association, which boasted that its membership surged to around five million in the aftermath of the Sandy Hook school shooting.

Gun violence and terrorism: The US spends more than a trillion dollars per year defending itself against terrorism, which kills a tiny fraction of the number of people killed by ordinary gun crime.

According to figures from the US Department of Justice and the Council on Foreign Affairs, 11,385 people died on average annually in firearm incidents in the US between 2001 and 2011.

In the same period, an average of 517 people were killed annually in terror-related incidents. Removing 2001, when 9/11 occurred, from the calculation produces an annual average of just 31.


The United States and China account for the most high-profile social platforms

Most top ranked social networks with more than 100 million users originated in the United States, but European services like VK, Japanese platform LINE, or Chinese social networks WeChat, QQ or video sharing app Douyin have also garnered mainstream appeal in their respective regions due to local context and content. Douyin’s popularity has led to the platform releasing an international version of its network: a little app called TikTok 6077.


January 8, 2015 Day 353 of the Sixth Year - History

The Feel-Good Guide to Sports, Travel, Shopping & Entertainment

The Lunar New Year dates from 2600 BC, when the Emperor Huang Ti introduced the first cycle of the Chinese zodiac.

Because of cyclical lunar dating, the first day of the year can fall anywhere between late January and the middle of February.

On the Western calendar, the start of Chinese New Year this year falls on Friday, February 12, 2021 — The Year of the Ox.

If you were born in 1913, 1925, 1937, 1949, 1961, 1973, 1985, 1997, 2009, 2021, you were born under the sign of the ox.

(To find out what sign you were born under, see the Chinese zodiac.)


What it means to be born in the Year of the Ox

"Watch the quiet ones". It's the phrase most often associated with ox people, who may seem easy-going at first, but possess an unwavering integrity they adhere to no matter what the obstacle.

People born in the Year of the Ox are quietly -- although supremely -- self-assured. As a result, they were born to lead and, together with their strong physical stamina, often become outstanding in whatever field they choose.


Born in the Year of the Ox: President Barack Obama, Princess Diana, and Hollywood actor George Clooney.

Negative aspects to the sign include a certain stubborness as their narrow scope of vision only allows them to see things as good or bad, right or wrong. But they are also stubbornly loyal to close friends and family, and will never betray a confidence.

However, when opposed, their fierce tempers are equally legendary. So friends AND enemies should always follow this very wise advice: No matter how affable and laid-back they appear, never cross an ox!

Famous people and historical figures born under the Sign of the Ox include Johann Sebastian Bach, Napoleon Bonaparte, Charlie Chaplin, George Clooney, Princess Diana, Walt Disney, Anton Dvorak, Clark Gable, George Frideric Handel, Oscar De La Hoya, Richard Nixon, Barack Obama, Aishwarya Rai, Wayne Rooney, Margaret Thatcher, and Vincent Van Gogh


Celebrating Chinese New Year - it's a family affair

In Chinese culture, the new year is a time to begin again. It's little wonder why Chinese New Year is also known as the Spring festival with hope for better times ahead. Families are outfitted in new clothes, front doors are freshly painted, homes are scrubbed sparkling clean, and banners are hung to declare a very Happy New Year to all!

Of course, food -- and lots of it -- is the centerpiece of any Chinese New Year celebration, and entire books could be written on various Chinese New Year food traditions that have originated over the centuries. As an example, carp is a main dish because the fish represents strength and endurance. For desert, oranges and tangerines are often featured since their Chinese names sound like "gold" and "wealth".

The colors of the new year are red and gold, signs of good luck and prosperity. During family get-togethers, gifts are exchanged and red envelopes are filled with "lucky" money for children.

Like Christmas lights that help to dispel the dark days of winter, the traditional Chinese lantern festival also plays a prominent part within the new year tradition. Strewn through neighborhood streets and marketplaces. these bright symbols of hope mark the return of better days as winter finally retreats -- and spring moves forward!


Chinese New Year as public spectacle

And what would the celebration be without dancing dragons and fireworks to bring luck througout the year?


A dragon weaves through the streets of Paris during a Chinese New Year celebration.
The longer the dragon, the better chance for good luck throughout the year.

One of the most auspicious signs in the Chinese zodiac, the dragon is a traditional symbol of good luck and prosperity among the Chinese. During the New Year, the beast is sure to make an appearance doing its snake-like dance via a team of street dancers -- who manipulate a long flexible dragon figure using poles positioned along its length. The longer the dragon, the more luck it will bring! Some dragons may stretch a 100 feet or more in length.

During the grand spectacle, firecrackers usually go off with a loud bang in order to ward off any chance of evil spirits getting in the way of all the fun!


Chinese New Year fun facts


Traditional dumplings for the New Year.

• While days leading up to the holiday are spent in a mad dash to clean every part of the house, it's considered bad luck on New Year's Day to touch a broom, take out the garbage, or take a shower for fear of washing away good fortune for the New Year.

• Dumplings were once considered a mainstay of every meal during the New Year celebration. Today, most Chinese households uphold the old tradition by making sure that dumplings are served on New Year's Day.

• Chinese New Year is by far the busiest season of the entire year for public transport, That's when family members travel long distances to be together for their most important holiday. Travelers must book airline and train tickets months in advance to ensure a seat. And, while everyone is welcome to join in, it is the very intrepid foreigner who will dare visit Chinese friends during the New Year!

• As luck would have it, you don't actually have to be in China to participate in a Chinese New Year celebration. The holiday is colorfully observed in cities with large Chinatown communities around the world each year -- including San Francisco, New York, London and Sydney -- each of them boasting the biggest and best!


More about Chinese New Year around the Web:

Around the Web, learn more about Chinese New Year celebrations in the U.S. and worldwide, browse festive clip art and e-mail greetings, or read up on holiday customs and folklore.

Chinese New Year - Wikipedia - Check out a wonderful overview of the history, symbols, customs & foods surrounding the 15-day festivities including information on traditional gifts, flowers, fireworks, good luck / bad luck superstitions, how Chinese New Year is celebrated around the world, plus lots of related links and resources.

Teacher Planet - Chinese New Year - This is a great collection of fun activities and instructional how to's including dragon crafts, paper lanterns & garlands, scavenger hunt sheets, related lesson plans, plus links to clip art & history resources.

Chinese New Year Greetings, E-Cards - A collection of animated and Flash greetings, Spring Festival, and Happy New Year cards.

Chinese New Year Clip Art - Check out kid-friendly images of zodiac signs, dragon parades and more.

Chinese New Year Recipes

The traditional New Year dinner for the imperial house was composed of 99 dishes since the number 9 is an auspicious number! Fish are a good luck food, but take care to serve the fish whole to preserve the good fortune.


Watch the video: St Lukes Service 12th September. 16th Sunday after Pentecost


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